The woods are wilting. I’m not exactly sure when it last rained in my area, but I know it’s been over three weeks. That was when I planted my food plot. I also know it had been several days before that since we had any significant rainfall. It’s not only dry, but the leaves are falling from the trees. All of this equals a fire concern. I hadn’t realized how bad the situation was until the other day when I took a quick trip into the woods to look for ginseng. I cannot remember seeing so many wilted weeds and plants – everything begging for a few drops of water.

The Weather Channel has been a constant tease. One look and there’s a 45% chance of rain. A few hours later, there is none. I can remember one day rushing to buy some more seed to add to my patchy plot before it rained. I never bought the seed. I’m glad, because it never rained. I’m praying Jesus turns the wine back into water. It is surely more valuable right now.

Is it global warming, climate change, or just something that is cyclical? I’m not sure. All I know is there’s no water on my food plot. I can blame God or General Motors, but ultimately, I make the difference by doing two things – by making sure I am not doing something wrong, and by adapting to the new conditions I am now in. For instance, if I’m planting a seed that is not conducive for growth in my area of the country, I’m doing it wrong. If I’m planting a seed that is meant for full sun in a mostly shaded area, I’m doing it wrong. If I am adding too much fertilizer or lime, I’m doing it wrong. If the landscape has changed over the years because of animal or vegetation changes, I have to adapt to the new environment when planting my field.

I am reminded of the African American scientist George Washington Carver who died in 1943. When the soil was being depleted by poor farmers who were continually growing cotton, he led them to sow alternative crops like peanuts, and then gave them over a hundred food recipes using peanuts! Now that’s doing it right and adapting! It is told that Carver once prayed, “Mr. Creator, show me the secrets of your universe.” And God replied to him, “Little man, you’re not big enough to know the secrets of my universe, but I’ll show you the secret of the peanut.” Today, farmers and deer hunters all over America are thankful for God’s response and Carver’s obedience.

We are stewards of creation. God appointed humans for that important work. To be ignorant or insensitive to her conditions is to be negligent in our duty. As we continue to grow and build, let us always ask God for the secrets of keeping his little planet in a way he will be pleased.

Gary Miller

Outdoor Truths Ministries

www.outdoortruths.org