On October 11, 1890, 18 ladies and four gentlemen met in Washington, D.C. at the Strathmore Hotel to formally organize a National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Each of the ladies present was a direct descendant of a Revolutionary War Patriot.  The four gentlemen were members of the first Advisory Board of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. The date of organization was selected because it was the anniversary of Columbus’ discovery of America. The Sons of the American Revolution had previously organized in 1889. At a general meeting in April, 1890, the Sons of the American Revolution made the fateful decision to exclude women from their organization. When this news became public, it prompted a scorching editorial to the Washington Post by Mary Smith Lockwood, who asked, “Were there no mothers of the Revolution?”  Her question attracted the attention of William O. McDowell of New Jersey, Vice President General at Large of the Sons of the American Revolution and a great-grandson of Patriot heroine, Hannah Arnett. In his own letter to the editor, Mr. McDowell suggested the formation of a National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution and invited women who were descended from a Revolutionary War Patriot to respond. Six women replied. Several meetings followed, with more women expressing interest. From this small beginning, a group of dedicated women formed the Daughters of the American Revolution to honor their Patriot ancestors and began a long history emphasizing service, historic preservation, patriotism and education.

From Jauflione Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution