Underground drainage pipes will be installed at the Scotland County Courthouse to remedy storm water issues that are threatening the building’s foundation.

Underground drainage pipes will be installed at the Scotland County Courthouse to remedy storm water issues that are threatening the building’s foundation.

In an effort to remedy drainage issues that are threatening the foundation of the courthouse, the Scotland County Commission recently gave final approval to a plan to install underground drainage tubes around the building.

PSBA Engineering submitted final plans for the project earlier this month and the commission voted to proceed with construction. Bids for the project will be opened at the December 22nd commission meeting.

The project calls for the installation of eight-inch trunk lines on the east and west side of the courthouse, with six inch inlets from the building’s six downspouts.

“The majority of the drainage issue is being caused by the roof water,” said Michael Purol of PSBA. “There is existing concrete around much of the courthouse that slopes away from the foundation, helping to remove the other storm water. This project will help remedy the drainage coming from the courthouse roof.”

Three new floor drains will also be connected to the two new trunk lines. The drains will be in the south courthouse entrance as well as the two restroom entrances, all of which are below ground level and collect storm water.

The north entrance was previously upgraded when the courthouse elevator was installed.

A third trunk line will be installed on the north side of the courthouse, connecting the lines from the east and west sides of the building, directing all of the drainage into the city’s storm sewer collection at the northwest corner of the courthouse lawn.

The project will also include construction of four manholes to allow for maintenance access.

“Our building is in pretty good shape,” said Presiding Commissioner Duane Ebeling. “We don’t want to let it get into the shape of some of the other courthouses around. This project allows us to start at the bottom and work up.”