October 27, 2011

Three Lady Tigers Earn All District Softball Honors

Three Scotland County softball players were selected to the Class 1 District 11 All District softball teams following the conclusion of the district tourney.

Megan Creek was named an all district pitcher, along with Cierra Hines of Brashear, Rachel Poston of Knox County and Ashton Reitz of North Shelby. Hines led her squad to the first district title in the programs history, with upset wins over SCR-I and Knox County.

Tri-Rivers Conference MVP Bailey Couch was named as all district catcher along with Meredith Thomas of Brashear.

Scotland County's Bethany Rader and Loren Smith were named as all district infielders. They were joined by Devin Gudehus of Knox County, Shelby Slater and Kristen Love of Brashear and Sierra Jacques of Novinger.

The all district outfield consisted of Olivia Nichols and Mackenzie Hustead of Knox County, Maria Gunnels of Novinger and Brittney Berhorst of Canton.

RV Reunion Held at Catfish Place

The annual reunion of residents of “Lake Josephine RV Resort” in Florida was held at the Catfish Place in Arbela, MO on July 11, 12 and 13.

Guests arrived from Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Florida and Missouri.

Everyone enjoyed dinner on Monday night at Keith’s Café.  The activities included golf, fishing, shopping, card games and a wiener roast.

The Catfish Place had a noon meal on Wednesday, the 13th, for the entire group.  Hosts were Steven and Gale Longworth, Patty Cripe and Melba “Babe” Mattingly.

Robbins, Sayre Announce Engagement

Sayre Wedding Announcement web

Carlon and Shirley Sayre of Memphis along with Kim Robbins and Rodney Robbins of Hull, IL are pleased to announce the engagement of their children, Tanya Sayre and Greg Robbins.  A September wedding is being planned.

Judy Boland Donates Elaborate Costumes to the Memphis Community Players

 

Judy Boland is pictured here with some of the elaborate costumes she recently donated to the Memphis Community Players to use in their theatre productions as well as the high school drama presentations.  The costumes were all hand-made by Judy and her late husband, John Boland, along with other members of the Krewe de la Boutte Dominique, and used in their annual Bal Masque held on the eve of Mardi Gras.

Judy Boland is pictured here with some of the elaborate costumes she recently donated to the Memphis Community Players to use in their theatre productions as well as the high school drama presentations. The costumes were all hand-made by Judy and her late husband, John Boland, along with other members of the Krewe de la Boutte Dominique, and used in their annual Bal Masque held on the eve of Mardi Gras.

by Andrea Brassfield

The Memphis Community Players recently received a generous donation of elaborate costumes from Judy Boland.  These costumes represent many years of hard work and tradition to Judy and her late husband, John Boland, who passed away suddenly December 26, 2015.

John and Judy relocated to Memphis following Hurricane Katrina, although Judy is actually a native Scotland Countian, graduating from Memphis High School in 1966, the daughter of the late Wayne Glasgow and Irene Dodge.  John served twenty years in the Army, retiring in 1992, and then worked for the Veterans Administration as a Federal Commissioned Police Officer in New Orleans, LA.

John and Judy were married in August, 1993 and spent the next twelve years with their families in Slidell, Louisiana.  While there, they enjoyed being involved with the rich Mardi Gras culture and became members of the Krewe de la Boutte Dominique, the first charted carnival organization in Slidell.

“Krewe de la Boutte Dominique” literally means “people from the Hill of Dominique.”  Historically, the Hill of Dominique is a place on Bayou Liberty close to St. Genevieve Church.  That church is significant in the history of the Krewe, since the original members were Ladies of the Alter Society at St. Genevieve.  Some Krewe members were descendants of the first families who settled the Slidell community.

This Krewe was established in 1970 and was a diverse group of hard working, fun loving people of all ages and all walks of life.  Together, its members provided the talent, creativity, energy, and camaraderie for which Dominique was well known for.  Unfortunately, following Hurricane Katrina, the Krewe became inactive, but is still remembered for their magnificent Bal Masque, which was held each year on the eve of Mardi Gras known as the Lundi Gras.

The late John Boland and his surviving wife Judy are pictured here in costumes worn during the 2000 Bal Masque of Krewe de la Boutte Dominique.  Judy was chosen Bal Captain for the 30th annual event themed “A Journey into the New Millennium”.

The late John Boland and his surviving wife Judy are pictured here in costumes worn during the 2000 Bal Masque of Krewe de la Boutte Dominique. Judy was chosen Bal Captain for the 30th annual event themed “A Journey into the New Millennium”.

The Bal Masque kept Krewe members busy all year.  Starting in April, the King and Queen, Maids and Dukes, and Captain were elected.  Once the Ball Captain was chosen and the announcement of King, Queen, Maids and Dukes was made, work began on designing and making the elaborate decorations and costumes for the Bal.  Additionally, Krewe members were responsible for their own costumes and paid for everything themselves.

Judy says while she sewed the costumes, John spent many tedious hours stoning them, placing the jewels and sequins meticulously where they belonged and gluing them to the fabric.  She also added, “I learned my sewing skills from 4-H and Mrs. Browning in high school.  In our class, we were well acquainted with the ‘seam ripper’.”

For Judy, the culmination of her hard work and dedication to the Krewe came in 2000 when she was selected to be that year’s Bal Captain.  The Captain was the person most responsible for the Masque Bal, leading the organization of decorations and costuming.  The theme for her Bal was “A Journey into the New Millennium”.  The working Krewe designed and created various depictions of the universe and space – some realistic and some the product of their imagination.

The Slidell Sentry-News reported on the Bal in their March 12, 2000 edition:

“The dramatic entrance of Captain Judy Boland through a time portal of smoke, personifying ‘Starship Commander’, signaled the beginning of the pageantry and pomp.  Her elaborate Medici collar was adorned with gold lame’ stars and the illusional cape accented her space suit.  She was attired in gold holograph spandex, accented by her headpiece of white ostrich plumes.  She carried a lighted laser saber and star-crested shield, completed by her golden laser gun, holstered in Old West tie-down tradition.”

John, voted a Duke for the New Millennium themed Bal Masque, also made a dramatic entrance “wearing black velvet, heavily embellished with appliqués representing the U.S. space missions, space shuttle, space stations, and an array of objects found in space, all hand-made of lame’ and glitter cloth, sequins, and crystals.”

The late John Boland is pictured here in his “One True King” costume which he wore in the 2004 30th annual Bal Masque of Krewe de la Boutte Dominique.  John was voted King of that year’s Bal.

The late John Boland is pictured here in his “One True King” costume which he wore in the 2004 30th annual Bal Masque of Krewe de la Boutte Dominique. John was voted King of that year’s Bal.

In 2004, it was John’s turn to enjoy the top honor of being crowned King of the 34th annual Bal Masque.  The theme that year was “Tunes of Animation”.  In addition to the Bal Masque, the de la Boutte Dominique float was seen in the Krewe of Slidellians and the Krewe of Pearls parades that year.

The Picayune newspaper in Slidell reported, “The audience rose in eager anticipation as “The Lion King”, or 2004 King John Boland, took the stage and descended for his first royal walk to the sounds of a lion roar and the tune “I Just Can’t Wait to be King.”  Applause and cheer greeted Boland as he displayed a lavish costume, crown and headpiece characteristic of his role as “Simba”.

To make this Bal Masque even more special, two of John and Judy’s grandchildren served as pages; Jesse Salisbury and Courtney Litzenberger, along with two other pages, followed the “Lion King” behind his train as a group of lion cubs.

Throughout their years of involvement with the Krewe of Dominique, John and Judy participated in costume designing and sewing for numerous themes including ‘Venetian Carnivale’, ‘Tunes of Animation’ and a military salute with ‘Stars and Stripes Forever’. One thing is for certain, whether he was filling his role as Santa Claus or “The One True King”, John Boland along with Judy, his life co-captain, graciously and whole-heartedly embraced their work with enthusiasm and dedication.

Though difficult to part with these amazing costumes, Judy is excited to see them put to use and hopes to return to future theatre presentations where she can watch them come to life again by our own community players and high school performances.

Hyde Reunion

The annual Hyde Reunion was held at the Grand Hall in Memphis on Sunday, July 17, 2016.  Those in attendance believe this to have been the 41st reunion.    Over 70 descendants and friends of Hollis and Nellie Hyde, and Virgil and Helen Hyde gathered to enjoy a catered meal prepared by the Rutledge School Restoration Group.  The afternoon was spent visiting, taking and sharing pictures, and reminiscing.

Those in attendance were: Mr. and Mrs. Leland Hyde,   Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hyde, Mr. and Mrs. Richie Radar, Annette and Dustin Humphrey, Jerry Hyde, Mary Morgan and Karla Rainey, all of Memphis; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bertram of Gorin; Mr. and Mrs. Kirk Townsend, Joshua and Danielle of Wyaconda and Taylar Eggleston-Wood; Tim and Chloe Bertram and Richard Hyde, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Hunziker and Hunter, Connie Bross,  Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Hunziker,  Mr. and Mrs. Asie Boatman, and Lance Boatman of Kahoka;   Stacey Boatman of Wayland; Connie Hyde, Tobias and Oakley Hyde, and Michaela Newberry of Luray; Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Hyde of Eldora, IA;   Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Waterman, and Taylor and Cole Courtney  of Donnellson, IA; Mr. and Mrs. Bob Thompson, and Mr. and Mrs. Norman Hughes of Kirksville; Mr. and Mrs. Gary Winkler, Brittany and Allison of Macon; Mr. and Mrs. Mitch Ballhagen and Jason Sherrer of Lebanon; Jessica Thompson and Nick Smith of Green City; Mrs. Kathy Hyde of Conway; Mr. Bob Moore of Keokuk, IA; Mr. and Mrs. Don Bundy, and Mrs. Vanessa Bowlin, of Blue Springs; Mr. and Mrs. Mark Bundy, Sandra Bundy, Stephen Bundy and guest of Lee’s Summit; Mrs. Margaret Hyde, and  Katie and Michael VanMeter of Independence; John Gauld V and John Gauld IV, of Kansas City; and Mr. and Mrs Chad Ebeling, Zach and Lydia of Mt. Pleasant, IA.

Mr. Maurice Hyde offered the blessing on the meal.

The next Hyde family reunion will be held on July 16, 2017.

Redmon, House Appropriations Committee for Agriculture, Conservation, and Natural Resources Continues to Work through the Interim

Representative Craig Redmon (right) pictured at a public hearing earlier this year, is keeping busy during the legislative summer break working with his colleagues on the House Appropriations Committee for Agriculture, Conservation, and Natural Resources preparing for the next budget process.

Representative Craig Redmon (right) pictured at a public hearing earlier this year, is keeping busy during the legislative summer break working with his colleagues on the House Appropriations Committee for Agriculture, Conservation, and Natural Resources preparing for the next budget process.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – While the Missouri General Assembly concluded the 2016 legislative session in May, members of the Missouri House of Representatives have remained busy throughout the interim with committee work and research that will pave the way for the next budget process.

State Rep. Craig Redmon and the members of the House Appropriations Committee for Agriculture, Conservation, and Natural Resources have met during the months of June and July to discuss and investigate numerous issues ranging from water quality and wastewater treatment to the outstanding maintenance costs for the state’s park system to funding for the statewide beef initiative. In addition, members have heard from department and division directors on issues such as feral hog control, and efforts to control the spread of invasive species like Asian Carp.

Redmon said he is proud of the work his committee members have done as they have gained valuable information that will help them to more efficiently allocate funding to the departments they oversee. Redmon’s committee is responsible for more than $780 million in appropriations for the departments of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Conservation.

“I know most folks think the legislature only works from January to May, but the interim is a time for us to carefully sort through the facts and figures so that we can make informed decisions on the budget during the legislative session,” said Redmon, R-Canton, who chairs the committee. “I am proud of my committee members for travelling great distances and giving up their time back in their districts to participate in these hearings. The end result is that we will have the information we need to make the best possible use of taxpayer dollars with the spending plan we craft.”

Redmon said the committee plans to meet again in August. For any questions, please contact Rep. Redmon’s office at 573-751-3644.

BABY MOORE

baby moore web

Michael and Kristan Moore of Memphis are the parents of a daughter, Kenzleigh Jayde Moore, born July 19, 2016 at 1:46 a.m. at Scotland County Hospital in Memphis. Kenzleigh weighed 8 lbs 10 oz and was 22 inches long. She is welcomed home by a sister, Kierstyn. Grandparents are Tony and Karen Moore of Unionville; Roger and Sonia Kaldenberg of Memphis; and Beverly Moore of Clever, MO.

BABY KIGER

baby kiger web

Kolt and Victoria Kiger of Kahoka, MO are the parents of a son, Kylar Allen Kiger, born July 19, 2016 at 11:08 p.m. at Scotland County Hospital in Memphis. Kylar weighed 9 lbs 7 oz and was 23 inches long. Grandparents are Troy and Mitzi Kiger, Kahoka; Jeff and Kim Dyer Maynardville, TN; and Wayne and Kim Barkman of Maynardville, TN.

Dauma to Celebrate 95th Birthday

verlee bday web

Dorothy Verlee Chambers Dauma will be celebrating her 95th birthday on July 31st. She was born in 1921 in Scotland County. Verlee was married to Harley Wayne Dauma for over 70 years prior to his death in 2012. The couple has three sons, Kenneth A. Dauma, Stephen S. Dauma, and Jon A.C. Dauma; six grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Verlee is an avid family researcher. She has been Registrar for the Jaiflione Chapter for many years and has proved and completed over 50 applications.  She is a member of the Scotland County Genealogy Society and volunteers at the Scotland County Senior Center weekly.  She belongs to the 1st Baptist Church of Memphis and is active in the Joy Group.  Verlee co-authors a guest column, American History Moment, for the Memphis Democrat.  She enjoys sitting on her deck surrounded by her flower garden and watching the wrens and their hatchlings leave the nest.

Scotland County Hospital Admissions & Dismissals

Scotland County Hospital recorded 46 admissions and 42 dismissals from July 2 – July 21, 2016.

ADMISSIONS: 7/2/16 – Frances Oliver, Arbela; Joann Ferguson, Memphis 7/6/16 – Nicole Cowell, Memphis; Emersyn Cowell, Memphis 7/7/16 – Opal Emel, Memphis 7/11/16 – Baillie Ledford, Queen City; Lora Buckallew, Greentop; Kyson J. Buckallew, Greentop 7/12/16 – Chandler Cole Harris, Memphis; Raillie Ledford, Queen City; Baillie Ledford, Queen City; Holly Miller, Warsaw, IL 7/14/16 – Amber Kaldenberg, Memphis 7/15/16 – Delia Priebe, Memphis 7/19/19 – Kenzleigh Jayde Moore, Memphis; Kristan Moore, Memphis; Kylar Kiger, Kahoka 7/21/16 – Christine Marlow, Memphis; Julietta Marlow, Memphis

DISMISSALS: 7/8/2016 – Nicole Cowell, Memphis; Emersyn Cowell, Memphis 7/9/16 – Opal Emel, Memphis 7/13/16 – Lora Buckallew, Greentop; Kyson J. Buckallew, Greentop; Helen Hammack, Memphis 7/14/16 – Chandler C. Harris, Memphis; Baillie Ledford, Queen City; Raillie Ledford, Queen City; Frances Oliver, Arbela 7/15/16 – Amber Kaldenberg, Memphis 7/17/16 – Delia Priebe, Memphis 7/21/16 – Kylar Kiger, Kahoka; Kristan Moore, Memphis; Kenzleigh Jayde Moore, Memphis.

White Friend, Where to Begin…

White Friend, Where to Begin…

Taken from the Blog Run the Race, published by former SCR-I graduate Nicki (Webber) Moore who currently serves as the Athletic Director for the University of North Carolina.

 “Black people don’t need to be convinced that anti-black racism, structural inequity and skin privilege are facts; white people do… White people have to do the hard work of figuring out the best ways to educate themselves and each other about racism. And I don’t know what that looks like, because that is not my work, or the work of other black people, to figure out. In fact, the demand placed on black people to essentially teach white folk how not to be racist or complicit in structural racism is itself an exercise of willful ignorance and laziness.”Darnell L. Moore, senior editor at Mic and co-managing editor of The Feminist Wire.

In the wake of yet another two police shootings of young black men, I am moved even further this time toward, and perhaps finally beyond the edge of my comfort zone. Sitting in the St. Louis airport returning home from a vacation, during which per usual I did not have to think about my race, I watched the Diamond Reynolds’ live stream unfold followed by President Obama pleading with us to be better than this, I realized I can not remain on the sidelines.

I don’t know where to start, but neither do most of my white friends and family. And, if it is up to us to fix ourselves, and I allow myself to be paralyzed by my fear, my busy-ness and my not-knowing, how can I sincerely hope that we will ever get better? When you consider that I have even been trained in these matters, have spent hours soul-searching, reading and conversing, and have a sincere desire to help, an even gloomier picture is painted when I am not actively, consistently involved in doing something – anything.

I am ashamed to admit that I’ve tried to shake it…that sneaking feeling I have had when hearing the Edmund Burke quote, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” It’s been there – in the back of my head, or a corner of my heart – a sense of some kind that I am part of the race problem in our country if I’m not actively working to be part of the solution. I tell myself I’m busy. I tell myself I AM actively working – internally. I quiet that feeling by reminding myself that I have a demanding career, a family to support guide and enjoy, extended family to encourage and a home to keep. I’m doing things that help people in other ways. I retweet articles that strike a chord with me and that feel like they are centrist enough that they won’t terribly offend, turn off or further alienate my largely-white network of friends, colleagues and acquaintances.

But, it’s not enough. It isn’t even CLOSE to enough. Just like I want more men to start doing the work with other men to sincerely understand that women are their EQUALS – not because they are someone whom they possess (their moms, their daughters, their sisters, their aunts) – but because we are fellow human beings. Period. Anyway – I know that women can’t solve the problem of male privilegemisogyny, and everyday sexism without men being 1) aware of it, 2) educated about it, 3) moved to a point of action about it, 4) taking consistent, constructive action to change themselves, 5) taking consistent, constructive action to advocate change among others, and 6) taking consistent, constructive action to change the plethora of systems that quietly perpetuate current norms.

By the same token, people of color (try as they may) can not do this work of fixing our society, our culture, our country alone. White people carry an enormous share of the power and privilege and leverage available in our country, even though most of us are unaware of this fact. My white friends, if we want a country that is stronger, healthier, smarter, more Godly, more wealthy, more fair and more free, WE MUST DO OUR PARTS TO ADDRESS THE RACE ISSUES IN OUR COUNTRY. These issues belong to all of us, even if you can’t see it just yet – please trust that each of us can do something to help.

Stumble as I may, screw up as I will, I am going to try to help. Please come along with me to daily think about and generate action. Let’s start today.

Suggested action: Grab a journal and respond to these 3 questions:

How might I possess privilege (defined as “when one group has something of value that is denied to others simply because of the groups they belong to, rather than because of anything they’ve done or failed to do.” ~Peggy McIntosh)? Some categories to consider:

Race

Gender

Citizenship

Class

Sexual orientation

Ability

Religion

Physical stature

Health

How might my privilege in any of these categories affect how I perceive someone or act toward someone who has less privilege in the same category?

What is one thing I can do today to use my privilege to enhance the life of someone else who lacks that same privilege?

I’ll do the same, and I’ll share the results with you in the next couple of days. Maybe some good ideas for actions will result. Maybe we can begin to peer outside of our comfortable positions of privilege to contribute in a more proactive, tangible, real way to making our small corners of this world a more equal, respected and loving space.

I expect it will be painful, I expect it’ll take some of my all-too-scarce time, and I expect it to be an inconvenience. I also know with certainty that if I get to the end of my life not having tried a little harder because it hurt a little, took some time and was inconvenient, that I will have defaulted on the glorious loan of life my God has given me. Who knows – it might actually work, it might in fact add a little light to the darkness, and it might be a rich adventure.

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