September 9, 2010

Indians Air Attack Too Much for Scotland County in 34-12 Loss

32-12 is a loss no matter how one looks at it, but heading into Friday nights game versus perennial powerhouse Clark County, it was anyones guess what to expect from Scotland County, which was coming off a disappointing 31-0 defeat at Salisbury in the teams opener.

While the team dropped to 0-2 on the year, Fridays performance against the Indians definitely provided a needed ray of hope for the Tiger faithful.

SCR-I did not get off to a promising start. After taking the opening kickoff and securing the initial first down, the Tigers coughed the ball up near midfield.

Clark County wasted little time taking advantage of the turnover. Justin Alderton scored on a five-yard TD run with 7:57 left in the first quarter. The PAT kick made the score 7-0.

After Sabe Sears gave Scotland County good field position with an excellent kick return, SCR-I went three and out and was forced to punt.

The Tigers defense looked much better on its second trip. Laden Holt made a good tackle to pin Clark County with a third down and long. But the Indians were still able to move the chains.

Harley Stone backed up Clark County with a quarterback sack, but another third down and long was quickly erased when Seth Williams connected with Dalton McCarty on a 66 yard touchdown pass that quickly made the score 14-0 with 4:31 left in the first period.

Coach Brent Bondurant challenged his teams defense after the play.

Were playing great defense for two or three plays and then breaking down and giving up the big play, he told his squad. We cant keep shooting ourselves in the foot.. We cant let them off the hook like that.

The defense got the message, but it was the offense that brought the Tigers back to life after the slow start.

Scotland County dominated the line of scrimmage on the next possession as Sabe Sears, Rod Sears and Harley Stone all picked up first downs rushing up the middle. Scotland Countys motion offense seemed to keep the Indian defenders off balance most of the first half.

Brock Bondurant connected with Rod Sears on a key pass play to move the chains and get the Tigers into scoring position.

Rod Sears finally capped off the drive with a nine-yard touchdown run up the middle to make the score 14-6 with 5.4 seconds left in the first quarter. A two point conversion by the Tigers failed.

Clark County tried to steal the momentum back, marching the ball down the field in just under two minutes. Williams scored on a 17-yard scramble to push the Indians advantage to 21-6 with 10:05 left in the first half.

The Tigers answered the challenge with another scoring drive. Stone moved the chains with a good run and followed it up with a pass play from Bondurant to get the ball near midfield.

Rod Sears corralled a shovel pass from Bondurant and ran free up the gut all the way to the 35-yard line. Sabe Sears the broke a 24-yard run that had SCR-I knocking on the doorsteps of the end zone once again.

Stone nearly crossed the goal line on the next play, leaving the Tigers with a short one-yard span that Bondurant gobbled up on a quarterback sneak on the next play to cut the deficit to 21-12 with 6:55 left in the second period.

That remained the halftime score thanks to a key stop by the Tigers defense. Ben Shannan made a tackle in the backfield before Rod Sears broke up a pass play to put Clark County in that familiar third down and long scenario. There was no big play to be had for Clark County as Taylor Rader, Andy Garrett and Will See put on a solid pass rush that forced back-to-back incompletions resulting in the Indians turning the ball over on downs.

The third period was all Clark County. The Indians took the kickoff and marched down field with Alderton scoring on a five-yard run with 10:41 left in the third period to make the score 28-12.

The Indians made the necessary defensive adjustments at halftime, shoring up the interior of the defense and shutting down the Tigers rushing attack.

After an SCR-I punt, the Indians again mounted a scoring drive capped off by a seven-yard pass from Willaims to Ryan Whiston to make the score 34-12 with 4:39 left in the third quarter.

The contest turned into a defensive battle in the fourth period as the two teams traded punts as time ran out on the Indians victory, once again securing the Jason Rockhold Memorial Traveling Trophy for CCR-I for another season.

Scotland County racked up 14 first downs in the game, but just three after halftime. Rod Sears had 79 yards on 12 attempts while Sabe Sears had 63 yards on 12 carries. Stone picked up 21 yards rushing.

Bondurant completed six of 13 passes for 62 yards, with five of the six completions going to Rod Sears.

SCR-I was flagged eight times on the night for 50 yards in penalties.

Clark County picked up 23 first downs in the contest with a balanced attack. Williams completed 15 of 26 passes for 242 yards and two TDs. McCarty had 111 yards and a TD on three catches while Whiston added five grabs for 55 yards and a score.

Alderton ran the ball 15 times for 91 yards and two TDs. Williams added 71 yards and a TD on eight rushes.

Sabe Sears led the Tigers defense with 11 tackles on the night. Bondurant made nine stops while Garrett and Stone each were credited with seven tackles.

Recent Grad Killed in Head-on Crash Near Memphis

Chester Robinson (#22) passed away in a head-on collision Tuesday morning in Scotland County just days after graduating from Scotland County R-I High School.

Chester Robinson (#22) passed away in a head-on collision Tuesday morning in Scotland County just days after graduating from Scotland County R-I High School.

Less than two weeks after crossing the podium to accept his high school diploma, a Scotland County graduate was tragically taken from the community in a head-on collision north of Memphis on Tuesday morning.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Chester E. Robinson, 18, of Memphis was pronounced deceased at the scene of a two-vehicle crash on Highway 15, seven miles north of Memphis at 6:47 a.m.

Robinson was northbound in a 2002 Pontiac Grand Am when he failed to negotiate a curve. His vehicle crossed the center line and struck a southbound 2000 Dodge Dakota head on.

The driver of the second vehicle, Scott A. Tyler, 21, of Bloomfield, IA, was flown from the scene by Air Evac Helicopter and transported to Iowa City Hospital with serious injuries.

The Patrol was assisted at the scene by the Memphis Police Department, the Scotland County Sheriff’s Office, the Scotland County Fire and Rescue Squad, Scotland County First Responders and the Scotland County Ambulance Service.

Chester Robinson

Chester Robinson

Funeral services are pending for Robinson at Gerth Funeral Service in Memphis.

Both vehicles sustained total damage in the accident and were removed from the scene by Lakeside Towing of Memphis.

Local Grad Standing Guard at Arlington National Cemetery

Former SCR-I student Joshua Lee Tague is a member of the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard which performs services at Arlington National Cemetery.

Former SCR-I student Joshua Lee Tague is a member of the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard which performs services at Arlington National Cemetery.

Less than three years after completing high school, a local high school graduate has found his way to Washington D.C. and has been part of some of the nation’s biggest events.

Lee Tague, a 2013 graduate of Knox County High School, enlisted in the United States Navy shortly after high school. Just months later his service has transplanted the young man in our nation’s capital, with regular service at Arlington National Cemetery.

Lee is the son of Larry and Tamara Tague. He attended Scotland County schools before transferring in high school to Knox County.

The Gorin native never imagined his career choice would send him so far away from home, so quickly.

His journey started in Great Lakes, IL, for basic training. He spent the eight-week process at the center, some 30 minutes outside of Chicago.

It was during basic training that Tague took part in an interview process for the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard. As a Naval Religious Program Specialist, he was eligible for the program, and after being approved for consideration, then volunteered for the prestigious posting.

Following boot camp, Tague spent two months in additional training for the guard, with emphasis on the special uniform as well as the M1 Garand rifle, the weapon used by the U.S. armed forces dating back to World War II.

“We definitely spend a lot of time making sure our uniforms are presentable and that our appearance is the best it can be,” he said. “Our motto is perfection is expected, excellence is accepted, meaning that while we know no one is ever perfect, we will work to achieve perfection every day.”

The attention to detail begins with the white gloves.

“We always wear gloves when touching our rifles or when handling a flag, out of respect to those instruments, which may have seen battle.”

Respect is the basis for all of the guards’ actions.

“Most people do not understand why we take these ‘little things’ so seriously,” said Tague. “Like standing at attention, working to show no emotion, regardless of whether it is raining, snowing or frigid cold. It is out of respect. That is our mission.”

While the gloves are important, the brass belt of the uniform is the pride of the Navy.

“It is the center piece of the uniform,” said Tague. “Depending on what the weather was like when you wore it, you can spend anywhere from 30 minutes to three or four hours every day or every other day, polishing that brass. It is a point of proud among us when some of the belts details begin to fade because it has been polished so much.”

Established in 1931, the United States Navy Ceremonial Guard is the official ceremonial unit of the Navy. Located at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling, Washington, DC, the Navy Ceremonial Guard’s primary mission is to represent the service in Presidential, Joint Armed Forces, Navy, and public ceremonies in and around the nation’s capital.

“We’re the face of the Navy at such things as parades, arrivals of foreign dignitaries and even at major sporting events,” said Tague. “For instance, we were there for the arrival in America of the Japanese Foreign Minister.”

Tague said this service was very prestigious, as it marked a key meeting with one of our nation’s greatest naval allies and was held on the south lawn of the Whitehouse.

He also served at the retirement ceremony for former Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel.

Most recently, Tague served as an escort during the ceremony for Navy Seal Edward Byers, the latest recipient of the Medal of Honor, and receiving the honor to escort him to the Hall of Heroes where the names of the medal winners are enshrined.

“Two years ago I never would have imaged being in the presence of such great people,” said Tague.

During the week however, the primary duty of the guard is to serve as the funeral escort and to conduct services for Navy personnel buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Tasking for ceremonies comes from the President of the United States, the Secretaries of Defense and the Navy, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Chief of Naval Operations, and the Commandant, Naval District Washington.  Navy Ceremonial Guard Sailors participate in numerous other military ceremonies at local commands.  Some elements of the command, such as the Drill Team and Color Guard, have represented the Navy in public events across the nation and around the world.

Tague gives much of the credit for his choice to pursue a military career to a former coach at Knox County High School, Keith Gudehus.

“He was a big inspiration for me,” said Tague. “Obviously his level of success is motivating, but for me his attention to detail and how much he cared about other people are truly what inspired me.”

Gudehus returned to coach the Knox County girls basketball program after retiring from the U.S. Army after 21 years of service.

“He set an excellent example for me, his selflessness and his ability to motivate others are part of why I enlisted,” said Tague.

Tague recently returned home for the funeral of his grandfather, Rodney Day. Day served in the U.S. Army, so Tague got to witness his military rites at the funeral.

“It definitely created a new perspective for me about what we do in the Ceremonial Guard,” he said. “I really appreciated the respect that was offered to my grandfather and our family. I’m honored to be able to do that for other military families.”

While still attached to the ceremonial guard unit, Tague’s career has taken a new path in public relations. Now an E-4 status, Tague currently is working with visitors at the Pentagon.

“I’m a liaison for visitors to the Department of Defense headquarters,” he said. “It is a public affairs posting, where we provide outreach services and work with the public. It’s quite a transition from standing silently at attention for hours at a time. Now much of what I do is talking and communicating.”

He believes his next posting may take him to North Carolina or California to work with the U.S. Marines. Ultimately the Scotland County native hopes one day to return to the diplomacy arena, possibly working at the State Department.

GERTRUDE BERTRAM DEEGAN (5/21/1914 – 5/21/2016)

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Gertrude Bertram Deegan, 102, of Las Vegas, NV, returned to her father in heaven at the Summerlin Hospital in Las Vegas.

She was born May 21, 1914; the daughter of Ernest and Ruth (Short) Bertram at Rutledge, MO. Gertrude married Walter (Bud) Deegan in 1959. They enjoyed a wonderful married life until his passing in 2003.

She grew up in Rural Scotland County areas of Rutledge and Gorin. She graduated from Gorin High School in 1932. She attended Northeast Missouri Teachers College, now known as Truman State University in Kirksville, MO. Gertrude spent the next eight years teaching in several rural schools around the area.

In 1941, Gertrude traveled to Longbeach, CA where she worked for an optical company and later was one of the first women to own her own company, Powers Optical Co. which she operated for the next 25 years. Gertrude was recognized in 1958 as The Women of the Year for the West Coast Eye Foundation.

After retirement, she moved to El Toro, CA. They lived there until her husband retired from employment in Orange County. They settled in Las Vegas, NV in 1991 where she kept busy with numerous activities.

She worked for Avis, Neptune Society, and was active in many social events in Sin City.

Gertrude was a member of the Colony Baptist Church while growing up in rural MO. She is a charter member of the Presbyterian Church in Las Vegas. She joined DAR at a young age and a member of the Eastern Star for 50 plus years. She was very active in church activities, clubs, and community work. Gertrude loved cooking (especially pies), entertaining, traveling, and being around friends and family. She had many wonderful times during her life, but coming back on the Amtrak train and attending her 80th class Alumni at Gorin in 2012 stood out as one of her favorites. She never forgot her rural roots and family back in Missouri.

She is survived by one sister-in-law, Rosie Fishback of Kirksville, several nephews and nieces; Chad York and wife Randi of Rutledge, MO; Ellen Sue Morris and husband Bill, Fenton, MO; Connie Scotti and Jim of Kimberling, MO; Pam Schmutzler and Monty of Jefferson City, MO; Kenny Mayfield and wife Nancy of Woodland, TX; Charlie Mayfield and Katherine of Colony, MO; Jan Hide and Dick of Kirksville, MO; and Terry Lynn Winters and Tom of Gilbert, AZ; and a host of friends and family. She had a special place in her heart for her friend Maria and friends at Las Ventanas in Las Vegas.

She was preceded in death by her husband Bud Deegan, her parents Ernie and Ruth Bertram, three brothers, Richard, Garland, and Gilvie Bertram, two sisters, Ann Lee York, Irene Mayfield, and one nephew Ronnie Mayfield.

 A life celebration service will be held at a later date in Las Vegas

Scotland County Senior Nutrition Center

MENU

Thursday, May 26 – Lasagna/Meat Sauce, Lettuce Salad, Hominy, Garlic Bread, Peaches

Friday, May 27 – Catfish Nuggets, Sweet Potato, Broccoli Salad, Peas, Cornbread, Ice Cream, Cake

Monday, May 30 – Center Closed, No Meals

Tuesday, May 31 – Meatloaf, Scalloped Potatoes, Marinated Tomatoes, Lima Beans, Slice Bread, Pudding

Wednesday, June 1 – Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Buttered Carrots, Hot Roll, Mixed Fruit

Thursday, June 2 – Ham and Beans, Onions, Carrot-Pineapple Salad, Buttered Beets, Cornbread, Cake

ACTIVITIES

Thursday, May 26 –   Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Monday, May 30 – Memorial Day, Center Closed

Thursday, June 2 –   Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Judge Webber to Speak at 70th Annual Memorial Day Services

The 70th Annual Memorial Day Services will be held on the Scotland County Courthouse lawn on May 30th starting at 10 a.m.

The 70th Annual Memorial Day Services will be held on the Scotland County Courthouse lawn on May 30th starting at 10 a.m.

A familiar face will take the podium on Monday as the Wallace W. Gillespie Memorial Post #4958 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars hosts its 70th annual Memorial Day Services on the Scotland County Courthouse lawn.

Judge E. Richard Webber will be the featured speaker for the event. Webber, the Senior United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Missouri, traces his legal roots back to Scotland County. He served as the First Judicial Circuit Judge in Memphis from 1979 until 1995. On August 10, 1995 he was nominated by President Bill Clinton for the federal judge position. He assumed senior status with the district court in 2009.

Born in Kahoka, Webber, attended the University of Missouri and graduated from the Missouri School of Law in 1967, when he moved to Memphis and started work as the prosecuting attorney before ultimately becoming a judge.

VFW Post Commander Larry Curry and program chairman Donnie Middleton will open the 70th annual Memorial Day services at 10 a.m. Don Norton and Mike Stephenson will perform the placing of the wreath at the soldiers’ memorial. Bill Camp will lead the gathering in the pledge of allegiance and Les Richmond of Ignite Ministries will lead the invocation. The Scotland County school band will perform the National Anthem followed by a patriotic music selection by the Memphis Community Players.

Presiding First Circuit Judge Gary Dial will have the honor of introducing his friend and college, Dick Webber.

James Parker will perform Sleep Soldier Boy with the piano accompaniment of Connie Courtney prior to the benediction by Richmond.

The service will close with the traditional 21 gun salute by the VFW rifle squad with the playing of Taps by Melinda Briggs with echo provided by Chris Kempke.

In case of inclement weather, the services will be moved indoors

Chabert Returns Home to Open Electrical Evolution Contracting Service

chabert web

Customers of Scotland County’s newest electrical contractor may be shocked to learn they may have known the owner growing up. Electrical Evolution, LLC is open for business in Scotland County after owner Chris Chabert, returned home to northeast Missouri.

Chris and his wife Randi relocated to rural Memphis in April and the couple is excited about the opportunity to bring their electrical contracting services to the community.

Chris Chabert  grew up in Scotland County and attended SCR-I High School until his sophomore season when his family moved back to Louisiana.

After earning an electrical technician degree and spending the past 10 years working in the electrical field, Chabert decided it was time to return home to Scotland County and start his own business.

Electrical Evolution will offer residential, commercial and agricultural wiring services, electrical maintenance and troubleshooting. Chabert will provide installation and new construction for wiring systems in homes, businesses and on the farm.

“I have 10 years of experience, working on a variety of projects from malls and hospitals, to grain bins, boats and alarm systems,” he said. “Just about anything with wiring in it, I’ve worked on it.”

His work experience includes three phase, as well high and low voltage systems and even 12-volt operations.

The electrician said he is available to work on grain bins, rehabbing older homes’ electrical systems, upgrading lighting options, or designing and constructing power systems for new construction.

For more information on Electrical Evolution, contact the Chaberts at 660-945-3057 or 660-956-5863.

Toblers Receive Outstanding Advisors for 2016 at IHCC

Indian Hills Community College President Dr. Marlene Sprouse and Certified Executive Chef and IHCC Culinary Arts Program Director Gordon Rader present the award of 2016 IHCC Outstanding Adviisors to doctors Randy and Heliene Tobler.

Indian Hills Community College President Dr. Marlene Sprouse and Certified Executive Chef and IHCC Culinary Arts Program Director Gordon Rader present the award of 2016 IHCC Outstanding Adviisors to doctors Randy and Heliene Tobler.

Culinary arts will always have students as long as the Toblers are involved.”  Those were the words of Certified Executive Chef and Indian Hills Community College Culinary Arts Program Director, Gordon Rader, at the annual dinner honoring the College’s numerous Advisory Committees.  Indian Hills Community College in Ottumwa, IA, recently honored Drs. Randy and Heliene Tobler with the Outstanding Advisors for 2016.  During the presentation, IHCC President, Dr. Marlene Sprouse explained that professionals from the community serve on these advisory boards, which support Indian Hills Community College by helping to shape programs and ensure the relevance of course content and instruction.

In Chef Rader’s remarks, he mentioned the Toblers enthusiasm for his Culinary Arts program at Indian Hills and their financial contributions to the program and to individual students in the program needing help with tuition.  He announced the Toblers newly formed non-profit organization for culinary arts in Southeast Iowa and Northeast Missouri called The Midwest Ambassadors for the Culinary Arts, or MACA, which is composed of a group of very supportive health care professionals and educators who love to eat well and have a desire to support a very worthy profession.  The organization is geared to not only help the IHCC Culinary Arts Program grow but to recognize and support the growing interest in culinary arts in the region.

Chef Rader said, “Randy and Heliene have been instrumental in enriching my own life by sharing their deep regard for humanity with me through mirth and wisdom each time we connect.  They understand what we do here at Indian Hills and together with all of our advisors, faculty, staff and supporters, we CHANGE LIVES.”

Drs. Randy and Heliene Tobler live near Bible Grove, Missouri.  Dr. Randy Tobler is an OB/GYN and the CEO at Scotland County Hospital in Memphis.  Dr. Heliene Tobler is a Holistic Nutritionist.  They have three grown children.  Together, they host the Healthy U Radio Show every Tuesday morning at 10:05 a.m. on KMEM-FM, 100.5, and they author a blog at Dr.Tobler.com. Dr. Randy hosts a Saturday morning political radio talk show out of St. Louis on 97.1 FM.

106 People Donate Blood At Memorial Drive

A total of 96 units of blood were collected by the Red Cross during the May 10th blood drive in Memphis at the First Baptist Church.

A total of 96 units of blood were collected by the Red Cross during the May 10th blood drive in Memphis at the First Baptist Church.

The Spring Red Cross blood drive held in memory of Stryker Anderson, who was born with a rare genetic blood disorder, was met with the greatest turnout we have seen in recent years with one-hundred-six people coming out to give blood.

Ninety-six units were collected during the May 10th blood drive with six first-time donors leading the way: Bobby Anderson, Esther Mae Good, Karla Martin, Faith Miller, Shannon Niffen and Mary E. Olson. May this begin a lifelong habit of giving to this lifesaving cause.

The following donors are recognized for reaching their respective goals: a one-gallon pin was awarded to Keegan Beard, a two-gallon pin was awarded to Abraham M. Zimmerman, three-gallon pins were awarded to Mary W. Good and Glenn Zimmerman, a four-gallon pin was awarded to Daniel Hite, Debbie Woods earned her seven-gallon pin, eight-gallon pins were awarded to Brent Bonderant, Priscilla J. Martin and David Zeiset, Jr., Ronnie Boyer earned his nine-gallon pin, Benjie Briggs was awarded her eleven-gallon pin, Richard Middleton earned a twelve-gallon pin and Larry Riney topped the list by earning his nineteen-gallon pin, which is quite an accomplishment.

Congratulations to Larry and all the others who are recognized for reaching their respective milestones in giving.

The Red Cross and local volunteers would also like to thank the community for their patience. With such a large turnout, some were required to endure waiting times far longer than normal.

We will continue to do all we can to make the process more efficient and reduce waiting time. The following local businesses and churches are recognized for their generous donations to this event: The Daisy Patch for supplying long-stem roses to all the donors, J’s Foods for supplying orange juice, The First Presbyterian Church of Memphis for a generous supply of homemade cookies, The First Baptist Church for supplying sandwiches and Pizza Hut for supplying personal pan pizzas to student donors.

Thank, you and God bless all those who came out to donate and all those who gave of their time to make this event possible. May Stryker’ s family remain in our thoughts and prayers.

Ruby Red Hats Meet in Memphis

The Rutledge Ruby Red Hats met May 16th at Keith’s Café.

Joann Rood and Marilyn Dunn were hostesses. Joann read some interesting readings and then lunch was served. Door prizes were drawn and given. There were eleven members and two visitors. Attending were, Virginia Hustead, Joyce Bass, Celina Erickson, Marjorie Peterson, Reva Hustead, Jewel Brown, Neta Phillips, Marlene Henry, Ruth Ludwick, Marlyn Camery, Joann Rood, and Marilyn Dunn. Next month’s meeting will be decided later.

Scotland County Area Moving On Program Will Meet May 31st

The Scotland County Area Moving On Program will be held Tuesday, May 31, 2016 at the Methodist Church at 1:30 p.m.  Chris Tinkle will have a Special Program.  Everyone is asked to bring a photograph of yourself or family and refreshments will be served by Exchange Bank of Northeast Missouri.

If you have suffered a loss, this program helps provide support through caring confidential visiting and fellowship with others that have lost love ones.  The group shares support and friendship with each other.  This is a monthly meeting with the time and meeting place decided on by those attending.

For more information or to arrange for a ride, please call Nelda Billups (328-6367), Laura Schenk (465-7363) and Chris Tinkle, program coordinator (465-7322).  Local sponsors of the program include The Daisy Patch, US Bank, Rose Hardware, Payne Funeral Chapel, Memphis Funeral Home, Countryside Flowers, Community Bank of Memphis and Exchange Bank of Northeast Missouri.

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