December 2, 2010

Dial Honored as Finalist for AHA's Shirley Ann Munroe Leadership Award

Marcia Dial, CEO of Scotland County Hospital in Memphis was recently honored as a finalist for the American Hospital Association's (AHA) Shirley Ann Munroe Leadership Award.

Colleen 'Casey' Meza, CEO of Clearwater Valley and St. Mary's Hospital and Clinics (CVH/SMH) in Orofino, Idaho is the 2010 winner of the award. Dial and two other hospital CEO's were recognized as finalists in the national competition.

AHA's Shirley Ann Munroe Leadership Award recognizes the accomplishments of small or rural hospital leaders who have improved health care delivery in their communities through innovative and progressive efforts.

Dial was recognized for her leadership and vision. Scotland County Hospital is a 25-bed, critical access hospital in a remote part of Northeast Missouri and serves as a vital health link to those in the surrounding community.

She has been with the hospital for over 35 years and has served as CEO since 1988. During that time she has helped the hospital grow through improved cardiovascular offerings, the creation of a women's center and successful recruiting campaigns that address the hospital's unique workforce needs.

Meza was honored with the award for efforts dating back more than two decades. In February, 1998, CVH/SMH forged a partnership through the Benedictine Health System based in Duluth, Minn. to form a regional health care system. Under Meza's leadership, CVH/SMH share a joint management team, exchange staff, enter into joint service and purchasing contracts and support one another in carrying out the mission of the Essentia Community Hospital & Clinics (formerly Benedictine Health System).

As a part of its health care mission, both hospitals acquired or established satellite medical clinics in Kamiah, Kooskia, Nezperce, Grangeville, Craigmont, Pierce, Cottonwood and Orofino. They hosted close to 45,000 patient visits in 2009. CVH/SMH has rapidly advanced its use of telemedicine and local collaboration to expand the services and care offered to its patients and community.

CVH/SMH serves all county residents in its rural community regardless of their ability to pay and cares for a large percentage of patients who are poor, lack insurance and are elderly. Meza understood that this presented a unique challenge for her hospitals. One successful approach has been to greatly expand their use of information technology (IT). Today the vast majority of her employees have email and Internet access - in 2003 this figure was only about 23 out of the more than 350 plus employees. Each facility has advanced videoconferencing equipment (Remote Presence Robot) that allows two-way mobile conferencing between doctors, nurses and off-site specialists to improve patient care on-site and offer further training opportunities for caregivers and staff. Additionally, patients now have access to psychiatric care. Through these advancements and more, CVH/SMH can bridge the distance between their hospitals and provide more for their community and the patients they serve while being conscientious stewards of the hospitals' resources.

Meza was appointed CEO of St. Mary's Hospital in 1989 and assumed the directorship of Clearwater Valley Hospital in 1998. She was recently awarded the 2009 Excellence in Patient Care Award from the Idaho Hospital Association for her telehealth program and for her efforts to promote the use of IT to her fellow rural CEOs. Additionally, she was named Health Care Hero by the Idaho Business Review and Business Person of the Year by the Lewiston Morning Tribune.

The two other finalists along with Dial were Gary W. Mitchell and Jim Dickson.

Mitchell, CEO of Newman Memorial Hospital in Shattuck, OK, has successfully advanced his vision for the hospital by providing innovative programs to sustain and enhance the availability and delivery of service in an isolated, rural area. Mitchell, serving as CEO since 1990, reestablished surgery through recruitment of local surgeons and expanded his medical staff during his tenure, focused on preventative measures to improve the communities' health and improved quality reporting within his facility.

Dickson, CEO of Copper Queen Community Hospital (CQMA) in Bisbee, AR, has continually met the hospital's mission to maintain and support access to basic primary health care throughout their community by providing leadership and vision to address opportunities and challenges. Dickson has been with CQMA since 1999 and through collaboration and innovation has successfully met the needs of the community in a changing health care environment and bring access to higher levels of care. Dickson has also greatly expanded CQMA's use of IT to connect its resources to other providers in the community.

The award is named after Shirley Ann Munroe, who was an advocate for small and rural hospitals and was instrumental in the creation of the AHA's Section for Small or Rural Hospitals, a forum working to support small and rural hospitals as they improve their community's health.

The award is sponsored by the AHA's Section for Small or Rural Hospitals and the Health Research and Educational Trust (HRET). It is presented annually to a hospital administrator or chief executive officer who has displayed outstanding leadership in meeting the ongoing challenge of small or rural hospital management. Last year's award recipient was Scott M. Street, president and CEO of Duncan Regional Hospital in Duncan, OK.

The AHA is a not-for-profit association of health care provider organizations and individuals that are committed to the improvement of health in their communities. The AHA is the national advocate for its members, which includes more than 5,000 member hospitals, health systems and other health care organizations, and 38,000 individual members. Founded in 1898, the AHA provides education for health care leaders and is a source of information on health care issues and trends.

SCR-I School Menus

Breakfast

Thursday, August 24 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Friday, August 25 – Sausage/Gravy Biscuits, Choice of Cereal, Cinnamon Toast, Banana, Juice/Milk

Monday, August 28 – Pancakes, Choice of Cereal, Sausage Link, Toast/Jelly, Strawberries, Juice/Milk

Tuesday, August 29 – Cinnamon Rolls, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Slices, Juice/Milk

Wednesday, August 30 – Ham/Egg/Cheese Croissant, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Fruit Medley, Juice/Milk

Thursday, August 31 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Lunch

Thursday, August 24 – Spaghetti/Meat Sauce, Chicken Fajitas, Hamburger Bar, Green Beans, Garlic Bread, Sliced Peaches, Fresh Fruit

Friday, August 25 – Chicken Nuggets, Fish Sticks, Macaroni and Cheese, Cole Slaw, Chocolate Ice Cream, Mandarin Orange Slices, Fresh Fruit

Monday, August 28 – Crispy Chicken Strips, Grilled Cheese Sandwich, 5th/6th Grade Chef Salad, Tri Potato Patty, Buttered Corn, Mandarin Orange Slices, Fresh Fruit

Tuesday, August 29 – School Made Pizza, BBQ Meatballs/Roll, 5th/6th Grade Taco Bar, Vegetable Sticks/Dip, Applesauce, Fresh Fruit

Wednesday, August 30 – Country Fried Steak, Chicken and Noodles, 5th/6th Grade Potato Bar, Whipped Potatoes/Gravy, Carrot Coins, Dinner Roll, Sliced Pears, Fresh Fruit

Thursday, August 31– Goulash, Mini Corn Dogs, Hamburger Bar, Green Beans, Garlic Bread, Applesauce, Fresh Fruit

Local 4-H Youth Take Part In 2017 Missouri State Fair

Elsie Kigar gives a 4-H demonstration “How to Make Homemade Noodles” at the 2017 Missouri State Fair in Sedalia.

SEDALIA, MISSOURI —  On August 13, 2017, Elsie and Eli  Kigar from the Jolly Jacks & Jills 4-H club in Scotland County presented demonstrations at the Missouri State Fair in the 4-H Building on the fairgrounds in Sedalia.

Elsie’s demonstration was entitled  “How to Make Homemade Noodles” while Eli gave a presentation entitled “How to Make A Dirt Hole Set for Trapping”.

The siblings were among the 300 youth selected to give a demonstration in the 4-H Building at the Missouri State Fair.  Missouri 4-H members compete at the county events in order to qualify for the State Fair 4-H Building demonstrations.

Demonstrations are a great way of sharing what the youth has learned in 4-H projects.  Preparing for a demonstration helps 4-H youth develop research, organization and communication skills.  Presenting a demonstration in front of a group helps 4-H youth build poise, confidence and public speaking skills.

For more information about the University of Missouri Extension 4-H program, contact Kristy Eggleston-Wood at the Scotland County Extension Center at 660-465-7255.

Eli Kigar receives his ribbon for being a presenter at the 2017 Missouri State Fair.

Putnam County Stops SCR-I 3-2 in Softball Season Opener

Katie Feeney’s head-first slide into home just beats the tag as she scored on a wild pitch in the third inning to knot the score at 2-2.

Ashleigh Creek smashed the first strike she saw in her senior season for a solo home run on Monday night in Memphis, but it was not enough as Scotland County fell to Putnam County 3-2 in the 2017 season debut for the Lady Tigers.

The Lady Midgets jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the top of the first with a couple of base hits.

But Creek trimmed the deficit to 2-1 when she led off in the bottom of the second inning, crushing a line drive over the left field fence to make the score 2-1. Khloe Hamlin and Abby Blessing followed with base hits to give SCR-I a chance at a big inning, but both runners were stranded.

SCR-I erased a lead off error in the third when catcher Katie Feeney gunned down a would-be base stealer at second with a nice catch and tag by shortstop Khloe Hamlin.

The momentum carried over to the bottom of the third when Feeney led off with a base hit. She stole second base and moved into scoring position on a ground out by Kaitlyn McMinn. The sophomore then sprinted home and her head-first slide just avoided the tag on a wild pitch to knot the score at 2-2.

But Putnam County pulled ahead for good in the top of the fourth inning. A pair of singles and a hit by pitch loaded the bases with two outs when a blooper fell in behind the mound and everyone was safe to make the score 3-2.

Creek worked out of a jam in the seventh, stranding a pair of runners.

Unfortunately, SCR-I managed just one base runner over the final four innings, a two-out single by Creek in the sixth, as Putnam County held on for the 3-2 win.

Creek took the loss on the mound, allowing three runs, two earned, on six hits and a hit by pitch. She struck out eight in seven innings of work.

Sammi Bradshaw limited SCR-I to two runs on five hits while striking out five.

Creek went 2-3 with a home run, an RBI and a run scored. Feeney, Hamlin and Blessing recorded the other hits, all going 1-3.

MARY LOUISE BROWN (10/30/1918 – 8/17/2017)

Mary Louise Brown, 98, died Thursday, August 17, 2017, at her home in Carbondale, IL surrounded by loving family.

She was born October 30, 1918, in Kirksville, MO, to George E. and Nannie Moore Leslie. She grew up in Memphis, MO, where she attended public schools and was valedictorian of her high school class. Following graduation with a Bachelors Degree from Kirksville State College, she taught in high schools in Kirksville and Monticello, MO. She was married in 1940 to Clyde Moseley Brown. In 1951 they moved to Carbondale, IL where they raised their family. After his death in 1965, she worked in Academic Advisement at Southern Illinois University until her retirement in 1988.

Mary Lou was a devoted mother, survived by her children Nancy Cook (Greg) of Makanda, IL, Susie Ellison (Lee) of Portland, OR, Bill Brown of New Braunfels, TX, Rosemary Hopson (Jack) of St. Louis, MO, Laura Ventetuolo of Cranston, RI, and Charles Brown (Jeanne) of Beltsville, MD. She was grandmother of 11 and great-grandmother of 23 children. She is also survived by her sister Nancy Harris of Memphis, MO and many nieces and nephews. She will be missed by many longtime friends and neighbors and by her dedicated caregivers, Diana, Eva, Rachel and Pat.

Mary Lou was an active member of the First United Methodist Church of Carbondale for 66 years, and of Chapter GX, PEO Sisterhood. She volunteered in her children’s schools and scouts. Among her many interests were traveling with family, playing bridge, gardening and reading. She was an enthusiastic supporter of Saluki Basketball, attending all home games for many years.

Services for Mary Lou were held Wednesday, August 23, at First United Methodist Church, in Carbondale, IL with Rev. Alan Rhein officiating. Burial followed in Oakland Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory to First United Methodist Church, Hospice of Southern Illinois or a charity of the donor’s choice will be appreciated. Envelopes will be available at the church.

Meredith Funeral Home, Carbondale assisted the family with arrangements.

To share a story or memory of Mary Lou please visit, www.meredithfh.com.

Rutledge Ruby Red Hats Travel to Quincy

The Rutledge Rudy Red Hats carpooled to Quincy, IL on Monday August 14th. Some of the ladies met at the Zimmerman’s cafe to depart while others gathered in Colony for rides.

We had a great lunch at Kelly’s Tavern.

Those present were Julia Hunolt, Charlene Montgomery, Celina Erickson, Alice Ann Gipson, Jewel See, Marjorie Peterson, Virginia Hustead, Reva Hustead and Neta Phillips.

Everyone received a gift from their hostesses, Dorothy Hunolt and Naomi Kidd-Schwandt.

The next meeting will be at El Jays Restaurant (where the VFW used to be). Our hostesses next month will be Alice Ann Gibson and Marjorie Peterson.

Submitted by Naomi Kidd-Schwandt

Classified Ads

LICENSE PLATES WANTED – Collector paying $1000 or more for old license plate collections. 816-365-0447.

HELP WANTED – Personal care attendant in the Scotland County area to work for consumers with disabilities.  For more info contact the RAIL office in Kirksville at 1-888-295-6461.

FOR SALE – Purebred KuneKune pigs.  The perfect old-fashioned, lard pig.  Fattens on pasture alone, won’t root up your fields and is VERY friendly!  Two boars ($300 each) and one gilt ($500), born this spring. Each will be microchipped and registered with AKKPS.  Visit whisperinggrassesfarm.com for more information or call 660-945-3733.

Cedar Grove Club Meets in Greensburg

The Cedar Grove Club met on Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at the home of Betty Bissell.  We enjoyed an all salad meal of chicken salad, potato salad, macaroni salad, cucumber salad, sliced tomatoes, and a dessert salad.  Betty said the blessing.

Reta Stott was on vacation, so Vice-President Betty called the meeting to order.  Present were Betty Bissell, Peggy Cumby, Christine Musgrove, Virginia Woods, and Phyllis Heckethorn.  Christine brought special guest, Joy Musgrove.

Peggy is going to notify Betty and Christine of when she will next be in town.  They will meet at the Care Center to discuss the Community Project.

The September meeting will be on the 13th at the home of Reta Stott.

Submitted by Phyllis Heckethorn

Rutledge Renegades

Charlene Montgomery and Naomi Kidd-Schwandt went to Kirksville.

Katrina and Neta went to Kirksville.

Katrina and Neta went to LaBelle Harvest Festival on Saturday, August 19th.  Neta rode on the Eastern Star #316/Masonic Lodge #222 float in the parade.

There was an exercise class at the Memphis Pool on Tuesdays and Thursdays. We called ourselves the “Memphis Mermaids”.  Our lifeguard was Megan Kice and our instructors were Lorri Shirkey, Katie Kittle Tuck, Kendra Schlater, and Megan Weber.  Some of the “Mermaids” were Ethel Barrett, Benji Briggs, Kathe Droege and granddaughter, Kallee Kretzer, Karen Kelso, Julie Chamley, Marilyn Blessing, Dee Wiley, Terry Sommers, Nancy Jo Waack, and Neta Phillips.

Ruby Red Hats of Rutledge will be going to Ogo’s in Keokuk, IA on Monday, September 18, 2017 at 11:00 a.m.   We will be meeting at Zimmerman’s at 9:15 a.m.

Lena Mae Horning and Marion Huber had to get up very early to come to work at Zimmerman’s.  They made 25 dozen donuts!!

Some of those in this week were Tim Morris, Dale Tague, Don Tague, Neta Phillips, Bob and Dorothy Hunolt, Martin Guinn, Reva Hustead, Marjorie Peterson, Ronnie and Bonnie Young, Oren and Celina Erickson, Doris Day, Charlene Montgomery, Ruth Ludwick, Katrina Hustead, and Victor Childers.

Mark the Path

I’ve learned over the years, to keep a watchful eye when I travel to a tree stand in an unfamiliar place. I especially do this when I’m hunting in another state. I’ve been lost a few times. When I’m walking in, I always try to turn around and look back to see what the view looks like going in the opposite direction. I also mark certain topographical differences such as a fallen tree or one that has a certain shape or characteristic. I also take with me some marking ribbon just in case I have to wander through the woods in search for an animal I may have shot. I will mark my path back to my tree stand.

I’ve just hunted long enough to understand that no matter how experienced I may think I am, I can and will get turned around in a strange place. One of the simplest inventions that came along a few years ago was reflective tacks. They are pushed into a tree and when passed over with a flashlight will make a path look like an airport runway.  I’ve hunted in some places where these tacks were put on both sides of the path every few feet, all the way to the foot of the tree where I was to hunt. Because someone marked my path, there was no way I was getting lost.

When I think about the most important things in my life, I am equally thankful some folks marked a clear path to keep me from getting lost. And even though I chose to stray from that path many times, it was not because the path was not marked sufficiently.

Wisdom is knowing when to blaze your own trail and when to understand the trail that others have blazed is the only way to go. It is also making sure you have marked the correct trail for those who will come after you. There are some areas in life that those who follow us must find out for themselves; things like what their call is or what their passions are. There is no shortcut for these pursuits. In other areas we can save them a lot of heartaches if we will clearly mark the path and warn them concerning leaving its narrow way.

Even though I had some great guides in my life, I also know if others had also accepted their responsibility for pointing me the right way, I could have learned a lot of important lessons a lot earlier than I did. Don’t ever be afraid to mark the path when you are exactly sure where it leads.

Gary Miller

Outdoor Truths Ministries

www.outdoortruths.org

Battle of Brier Creek

The Battle of Brier Creek was an American Revolutionary War battle fought on March 3, 1779 near the confluence of Brier Creek with the Savannah River in eastern Georgia. A Patriot force consisting principally of militia from North Carolina and Georgia was surprised, suffering significant casualties. The battle occurred only a few weeks after a resounding American Patriot victory over the British at Kittle Creek, north of Augusta,  reversing its effect on morale. Following the entry of France into the Revolutionary War in 1778, the British focused their  attention on the American South, to which they had not paid great attention in the early years of  the war. The British Commander was Mark Prevost. The American Commander was  John Ashe. On the afternoon  of March 3, 1779 a rider galloped into the American camp warning of the British approach. While the exact time they had to deploy is uncertain, the relatively hurried nature of their deployment is clear. The number of troops that actually formed up was about  900, as a  number of troops had been dispatched to the south for scouting and  others were on duty elsewhere. Distribution of ammunition to the men  was complicated by  the shortage of cartouche boxes and varying musket  calibers, and most of the Patriot militia did not have bayonets. Seeing the British charging at them, many broke and ran without even firing a shot. The result was a British victory. The American Patriots had at least 150 men killed, unknown wounded and 227 captured.

From Jauflione Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution

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