October 21, 2010

First District Representative Candidates Face Off at Canton Forum

This ain't her first rodeo... and it showed as Democratic Candidate Keri Cottrell used the experience she gained in an unsuccessful run at the First District Representative seat back in 2008 as a springboard for a successful showing at Canton on Monday evening.

Cottrell squared off against newcomer Craig Redmon, the Republican candidate for the post being vacated by Brian Munzlinger, R-Lewistown. The two candidates were the guests of the Canton Chapter of American Association of University Women (AAUW), which sponsored the forum allowing them to answer questions submitted live by the audience and read by a moderator.

What Redmon lacked in facts and figures, he made up for with straight forward answers, avoiding the pitfalls of partisanship along the way.

The October 18th event was held at Meaders Lounge on the Culver-Stockton College campus in Canton.

The two Lewis County natives introduced themselves to the mostly student crowd giving brief personal histories before answering a series of questions posed by the audience through a moderator.

With the event being hosted by Culver Stockton College, it was only fitting the first question had to deal with education funding in the state.

Redmon noted that education funding was a hotbed of discussion, with both he and Cottrell in agreement that the state needs to come through with better funding for schools while also eliminating the dollar modifier that is added for urban schools under the guise of higher costs of living in those areas.

"Everybody in Missouri knows, there is a pot of money that all services must be funded from as we are constitutionally obligated to maintain a balanced budget," he said. "So to fully fund education we are going to have to take from some other areas."

Redmon declined to pinpoint what areas, noting it would be unfair to promise budget cuts before ever being involved in the budget process.

Cottrell's experience shined through in her discussion of education funding. She gave a concise explanation of the state's education funding formula and the $6,177 per pupil adequacy target for state aid per student.

She also pointed out the First District is shortchanged by the system's funding on a per pupil basis.

"Our school districts are small in northeast Missouri, they are not the size of the district in Kansas City and St. Louis," she said. So when your overall funding formula is on a per pupil basis that is drastically harmful to the districts in northeast Missouri."

But Cottrell turned the funding formula from an issue of rural versus urban into a question of politics.

She noted that the funding formula was created by Senate Bill287 sponsored by Charlie Shields during a period of Republican control of both the house and the senate.

"The vote was 96 Republicans to 64 Democrats. So many people say that it is a rural versus urban issue, unfortunately I am afraid it is a partisan issue because of the vote that it received."

Both candidates highlighted their opposition to Proposition A, which if passed would eliminate a 1% earnings tax in St. Louis and Kansas City.

Cottrell stated the earnings taxes fund approximately 33% of St. Louis's budget and 44% of Kansas City's budget.

"If this is something we in northeast Missouri choose to support, then we are going to be receiving even more leftovers, as state government is caused to fund more services in St. Louis and Kansas City," Cottrell stated.

Redmon drew a round of applause with a short and to the point response.

"No I'm not for it," he said. "Basically it will take the tax that Kansas City and St. Louis is paying for their goods and services and defer it to northeast Missouri and other areas."

When asked what programs and agencies they would cut to fund drooping health care programs Redmon again steered clear of pinpointing any specific targets.

"I'm afraid I can't tell you what department's need to be cut, because I haven't been down there yet," he said. "It wouldn't be fair."

Redmon did note that with a state in a budget crunch as Missouri is, legislators owe it to their constituents to look at making cuts wherever feasible, adding "there should be no sacred cows, everything needs to be looked at."

Cottrell responded that her first cuts would be made by scrutinizing tax credits.

"There's about $587 million in tax credits," she said. "Tax credits are good if they bare the fruits there were supposed to bare. We need to evaluate them and look and see if they are continuing to do what they were supposed to do, and if they're not they need to be stopped and we need to put that money back into general revenue."

Cottrell also highlighted the 2005 Medicaid cuts.

"1,317 people had their access to health care taken away," she said. "The state legislature took those people from Medicaid but at the same time they chose to insure their own families on state-sponsored health insurance."

Both candidates shared similar sentiments on a number of issues raised at the forum, such as favoring campaign contribution limits, promoting agriculture and investing in renewable energy.

Cottrell highlighted the importance of ethanol and bio diesel tax credits to continue the viability of the fuel source to help decrease dependency on foreign oil.

In addition to the local value-added crop products, Redmon also pointed to the hydro-electric possibilities offered to the First District by its bordering Mississippi River as well as other alternatives such as wind power.

"What we have to remember is this will take a long-term commitment to these alternative energy sources," Redmon said. "This isn't going to happen overnight."

When faced with questions regarding big government and a growing bureaucracy, Cottrell noted that it is a standard line found in one political party's advertising.

"Adding all kinds of programs and funding all different kinds of additional agencies, that is not what we need to do," she said. "What we need to do is look at streamlining that and not working harder, but let's work smarter."

Redmon responded that he does think state government is too big. Again he deferred to identify any areas to cut, noting it is premature to make specific budget choices before being involved in the process.

The forum closed with a question voicing fear the candidates will chose to reflect the interests of their chosen political party in lieu of the needs of the First District.

"My party will always be second," Cottrell said. "That is one reason why I'm kind of proud to be a Democrat. Because in Jefferson City if you're a Democrat, they let you vote on the basis of what is best for your constituents."

Redmon highlighted his nine years of service on the Canton school board to answer the question. He related making decisions not just for his two children, but for the greater good of the entire district.

"I have to look at that guy in the mirror when I get up in the morning and know that I'm making decisions based on you folks and not based on what the people in Jefferson City want me to do," Redmon said. "It'll be tough, I know that. I'll be a freshman lawmaker and they're going to want to twist my arm hard on certain things, but at the end of the day I have to be able to call home and say I made this decision because it was in your best interest."

Highway 15 Coalition Targeting MoDOT 50% Cost-Share Program to Improve Route

Faced with a gloomy financial outlook for the state transportation department that makes improvements to Highway 15 in Scotland County highly unlikely, local advocates for upgrading one of the main transportation routes in the county are considering taking the matter into their own hands.

The recently formed Highway 15 Coalition has already discussed forming a Transportation Development District (TDD) to allow a local sales tax to be proposed to fund local transportation projects.

On Thursday, the coalition members heard from representatives of the Missouri Department of Transportation about the possibility of leveraging such local tax dollars to receive state funding.

MoDOT representatives discussed the department’s cost share program, which annually funds approximately $25 million in projects, with a 50/50 cost share with the local communities.

The group discussed the possibility of raising half of the roughly $2 million estimated cost for constructing four-foot shoulders on Highway 15 through a local sales tax, with the other half of the costs being footed by MoDOT’s cost share program.

Officials explained that the program is highly competitive, with each of the state’s eight transportation districts limited to just two projects per funding cycle.

Coalition member Dr. Jeff Davis expressed some hope that the program might help generate support for the formation of a local TDD.

“I’m sure there are plenty of people out there, when they hear about a proposed local sales tax for transportation, they’re going to say no, it is MoDOT’s responsibility, let them pay for it,” Davis stated. “If that is the case, it is pretty clear nothing is going to get done.”

Representative Craig Redmon seemed to back up that belief when he was asked the likelihood of the legislature coming up with increased funding for MoDOT. Redmon stated he didn’t expect lawmakers to be able to come up with a solution, especially in an election year when many were battling for their jobs.

“That is why the idea of the TDD combined with the MoDOT cost share program has me so excited,” Redmon told the gathering. “Local folks provide half of the funds and leverage it to get the other half from the state. They can see their tax dollars at work. It is tangible results instead of the sense of paying into a black hole and feeling like they’re getting nothing in return.”

The MoDOT officials indicated that cost share funds were already allocated for 2018 and 2019, but funds were available in 2020.

Davis noted that with initial projections from the county that a county-wide 1/2 cent sales tax would generate approximately $200,000, the necessary $1 million to fund the county’s half of a MoDOT cost-share approved project, would take just five years to secure.

MoDOT’s financial representatives noted that the Missouri Transportation Finance Corporation offers loans that can be repaid in such instances, if the project was to move forward before that projected five-year timeframe to generate the revenues.

Currently Scotland County has a 1.25% sales tax rate on top of the state’s 4.225% sales tax, for a total of 5.475%. That compares favorably to surrounding counties where the sales tax rates are 6.225% in Schuyler and Putnam counties, 6.725% in Clark and Knox counties and 7.35% in Lewis County.

An additional 1% sales tax in the City of Memphis raises the total sales tax to 6.475%, which is below the 7.225% rate in Lancaster, 7.725% in Kahoka and Edina, 8.35% in Kirksville, 8.725% in Queen City or the 9.35% in Kirksville districts which includes special sales taxes for transportation.

Members of the coalition expressed interest in creating a TDD to pursue the possibility of a cost share project with MoDOT to upgrade Highway 15.

The earliest a sales tax proposal could be placed before the voters would be April, with a January deadline to get the issue on the ballot.

A December 14th meeting has been proposed at the Scotland County Courthouse to consider moving forward with the proposal. MoDOT officials have been asked to provide refined cost estimates for constructing the four-foot shoulders, as well as information on how similar TDDs formed for Highways 36 and 63 were funded initially during start up.

Initial funding would have to be raised to pay legal fees to form the TDD with the Secretary of State’s office and prepare the ballot language.

Jolly Jacks & Jills 4-H Club Hosts November Meeting

The November meeting of the Jolly Jacks and Jills 4-H Club was called to order by President Elsie Kigar. The pledges were led by Alyssa Kirchner and Mason Mallett. Song Leaders, Hannah Whitney and Laney Mallett led the group with the Turkey Hokey Pokey.  What is your favorite food at Thanksgiving was answered by 29 members for roll call.  There were also 25 parents and guests present.

Secretary Kilee Bradley-Robinson read the October 2017 minutes and they were approved as read along with the treasurer report given by Corbin Kirchner.

Mason Mallett reported on his beef project.

4-H Shooting Sports Fun Shoot was reported on by Eli Kigar, Wesley McSparren and Zayden Arey.  Elsie Kigar reported on attending the Azen Jolly Timers fall hay ride.  Eli Kigar reported on the Gorin Go-Getters Haunted Trail.

Sadie Jackson, Kenna Campbell, Morgan Jackson, Wesley McSparren, Corbin Kirchner, Hannah Whitney, Trent Mallett and Mason Mallett reported on their participation in 4-H week.  The activities included wearing 4-H shirts to school, dressing up as their favorite project, talking on the radio, delivering cookies, and carrying out groceries.

Eli Kigar, Wesley McSparren and Corbin Kirchner reported on attending the Bible Grove Pie Supper.  The club provided the grab bags for part of the game prizes.

4-H Recognition Event was held on Saturday November 4th. Sadie Jackson, Morgan Jackson, Eli Kigar and Wesley McSparren reported on the awards they received.  Awards were passed out to those who were unable to attend.

Assistant Leader Lanea Whitney reported on the November 4-H council meeting.  Highlights included sale & premium check pick up, $10 per member for salary account, nomination for 4-H Hall of fame and council officer installation.  Members and leaders are asked to register and update your profiles in 4honline.com.  Volunteer Applications and Orientation was discussed.

In old business:  Members were reminded to pay for your club t-shirts if you have not done so.  RaElla Wiggins reported on Cards for Troops drive.

The annual traveling bake sale will be on November 22 beginning at 9 am at Jackson Auction Building.  Each family is asked to bring baked goods for this fundraiser.

In new business:  The club agreed to continue Christmas caroling at the Care Center with the Greensburg Willing Workers this year.  A date will be announced at the December meeting.

Jenny Mallett asked the group about purchasing wreaths for Veteran’s Graves at the Memphis Cemetery.  The group agreed to purchase four wreathes.  Jenny will take care to the details.

Announcements:  December 5 will be the next meeting at the Hospital Conference room at 5:30.  January Council meeting is January 17th at 7 pm at the courthouse.  Achievement Event is tentatively set for March 5 and 2018 Fair dates are July 8-14.

Wesley McSparren was volunteered for a demonstration at the December meeting.

After adjournment, game leader Kenna Campbell set up hang men for the members to play while enjoying their snacks.

Submitted by Wesley McSparren, Reporter

Happy Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving to all of you from all of us here at Pine Ridge Bluebird Trails. We are enjoying this time of gathering together with family and friends. I have had a few birds at my front porch feeder. I do not have a lot of leaving shrubbery to protect my birds right around my house, so this makes for a problem.

With many farmers and landowners ridding their farms of hedgerows, and other thicket areas, the places for some birds to go in the winter time are getting fewer. We do have a few trees left on our east fence line here at the trails and some hedgerows on our other farms, but that is not here. I personally like to leave as many trees on the trails as I can.

This year I needed work done on a pond, and in order to do that work I was going to have to cut 16 trees.  I am still trying to figure out what I can do to fix the pond and leave the trees. I have also always liked pines to help with covers for the birds and brush piles also help. I know I have explained how you can make a man made brush pile designed for birds and rabbits during the winter.

I am in the process of building an area for the birds and feeders.  I have several shrubs set out and next spring plan to mulch and border it.  I want to eventually get enough growth to place a few feeders in the area and have some protection for the birds as well. I am also planning to plant some hummingbird-friendly flowering plants there as well.  I am excited as this should be a fun spot to watch.

Boy, haven’t the deer been taking a hit on the roads this last week. I have counted numerous deer. The Eagles have sure been busy around here. I love watching them. They move ahead of the combines in the fields and take care of most of the rabbits. Duane said he noticed several hovering over the fields near the combines flying away with rabbits. The food chain is at work.

If you are able, you will want to keep water out for the winter time birds.  I have two heated bird baths and they really enjoy them.  Now is the time to get ready for those colder days.  Have you been able to find any bird nests in your bare trees.  There are several around here, which I have noticed.  My time was limited this week, so I have not been able to look as much as I would like to.

Enjoy your family this thanksgiving season, and spend some quality time with them.  Until next, time good bird watching.

Scotland County Senior Nutrition Center

MENU

Thursday, Nov. 23 – Center Closed, No Meals, Happy Thanksgiving!

Friday, November 24 – Center Closed

Monday, November 27 – Juicy Burger/Bun, French Fries, Mixed Vegetables, Cottage Cheese, Peaches

Tuesday, November 28 – Roast Pork, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Sauerkraut, Green Beans, Bread, Cake

Wed., November 29 – Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Buttered Carrots, Hot Roll, Fruit Salad

Thursday, Nov. 30 – Swiss Steak, Scalloped Cabbage, Buttered Peas, Slice Bread, Pudding/Fruit

ACTIVITIES

Thursday, Nov. 23 – Center Closed Today, No meal or cards.

Friday, Nov. 24 – Center Closed.

Monday, Nov. 27 – AAA and Care Meeting in Shelbina at 10:00 p.m.

Thursday, Nov. 30 – Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

SCR-I School Menus

Breakfast

Thursday, November 23 – Happy Thanksgiving, No School.

Friday, November 24 – No School.

Monday, November 27 – Mini Breakfast Bites, Choice of Cereal, Cinnamon Toast, Orange Slices, Juice/Milk

Tuesday, November 28 – Oatmeal, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Peanut Butter, Apple Wedges, Juice/Milk

Wed., November 29 – Ham/Egg/Cheese/Biscuit, Choice of Cereal, Cinnamon Toast, Apple Wedges, Juice/Milk

Thursday, November 30 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Lunch

Thursday, November 23 – No School, Happy Thanksgiving!

Friday, November 24 – No School.

Monday, November 27 – Hot Dog/Bun, Bar BQ Ribb/Bun, 5th/6th Grade Chef Salad, Macaroni and Cheese, Mixed Vegetables, Mandarin Orange Slices, Fresh Fruit

Tuesday, November 28 – Chicken Patty/Bun, Juicy Burger/Bun, 5th/6th Grade Taco Bar, Curly Q Fries, Buttered Corn, Sliced Pears, Fresh Fruit

Wed., November 29 – Meatloaf, Sliced Ham, 5th/6th Grade Potato Bar, Scalloped Potatoes, Cauliflower/Cheese Sauce, Dinner Roll, Jell-O/Fruit

Thursday, November 23 – Chili Soup, Chicken Noodle Soup, Hamburger Bar, Turkey Salad Sandwich, Pickle Spear, Cheese Stick, Saltine Crackers

Ministerial Alliance Continuing Coat Drive, Food Collection Efforts

The Scotland County Ministerial Alliance met on November 8th at the St. Paul Church in Memphis. Those present were:  Mark Appold, Dan Hite, Diana Koontz, and Jack Sumption.

The coat drive is still ongoing.  So far there have been 10 children’s coats, and 20 adult coats donated.  The group indicated a continuing need for more children’s coats.

The food drive is ongoing with Counselor Dani Fromm collecting food for the drive at the elementary school and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes handling the duties at the high school. The collection will be presented at the Community Thanksgiving Service.  The FCCLA annual Halloween food drive brought in roughly four to six grocery carts of food for the Food Pantry. The local Boy Scouts will assist with the collection and delivery of the food items to the food pantry after the Community Thanksgiving Service.

The 2018 calendar was presented to the meeting for review. Copies of the calendar will be distributed at the December SCMA meeting.

The Thanksgiving Service is being organized by Dan Hite. Nathaniel Orr will be leading the music.  Amy Carleton will be singing also.

Public input is always welcome at the Ministerial Alliance meetings. The next meeting will. be December 13th at 1 p.m.

All You’re Meant to Hear

Most of us hunters like to consider ourselves of the diehard variety. We’re not afraid to get up early, stay out late, and do whatever it takes to get our deer; unless it’s walk more than about a quarter of a mile from our vehicle. It’s true. Most hunters don’t hunt too far off the beaten path. I’ve actually seen some folks ride their four-wheeler up to the very tree they are hunting in. They say the deer never notice. I say they do.

I do believe when deer are pressured they move to some strange places. Oftentimes it’s right next to a road or even a highway. I can remember one year while hunting in Alabama, my friend set up right next to a four lane highway. On the last day of the hunt he killed a nice eight-pointer. I’m sure that deer never imagined a hunter setting up in such an uncommon area.

For me, there’s something about being in a place where I can hear no road noise. I don’t like having to listen for the rustle of leaves through the sounds of rush hour. The purity of the hunt seems tainted when the sounds of the woods are competing with the sounds of a nearby highway. I like being able to hear every squirrel’s bark and every birds chirp.

I’ve noticed my time with the Lord is often characterized this way as well. I find at times I try to hear God without getting far enough away from the sounds of my daily grind. It may be a cell phone, a T.V., or even a time restraint that’s not allowing me to hear all that I’m meant to hear. As a result, the experience is not what I need or what God wants.

The problem is that I’m just hunting (praying) too close to my truck. I’m doing it because it’s the easiest thing to do. But again, the best ones are far off the beaten path.

Right now there’s something you need God to speak to you about. You have a need, or a problem, or a direction that you have questions about. And it’s a big one. For these-sized answers you’re going to have to get away from all the sounds of the world you’re in and remove yourself from anything that will keep your attention from Him. It may take a little longer and a little more effort to get there, but we know that both will have been worth it when you return with the God-sized answer you had hoped for.

Gary Miller

Outdoor Truths Ministries

www.outdoortruths.org

McKee, Hunt Accepted to Culver-Stockton’s Class for Fall 2018

Two local students are among the members of the prospective Culver-Stockton’s fall 2018 incoming class set to head to Canton next August.

Meghan McKee and Lydia Hunt of Memphis have been accepted by Culver-Stockton College, for entry into the four-year residential institution, which is affiliated with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). C-SC specializes in experiential education and is one of only two colleges in the nation to offer the 12/3 semester calendar, where the typical 15-week semester is divided into two terms, a 12-week term and a 3-week term.

The C-SC Wildcats are members of the Heart of America Athletic Conference (HAAC) and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA).

FREDERICK “WAYNE” MATHES (8/27/1933 – 11/16/2017)

Mr. Frederick “Wayne” Mathes, age 84 of Bolivar, MO passed away Thursday, November 16, 2017, at the Missouri Veterans Home at Mt. Vernon, MO. He was born August 27, 1933, in Scotland County, MO, to Fred M. and Anna Barbara (Gardine) Mathes. He was united in marriage to Anna Jean (Ketchum) Kutzner November 19, 1977.

He was preceded in death by his parents; one brother, Kenneth Mathes; sister-in-law Betty Mathes; a sister, Elizabeth McClamroch; and a brother-in-law, Hillis McClamroch.

Wayne is survived by his wife of 40 years, Anna Jean, of the home; two step-daughters, Sherri Kutzner, and Cindy (Kutzner) Rhoads and husband Joe all of Bolivar, MO; as well as other relatives and friends.

Graveside memorial services were held Sunday afternoon, November 19, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. at the Memphis Cemetery, Memphis, MO, with Brother Joe Rhoads officiating. Full military graveside rights were provided by the Wallace W. Gillespie V.F.W. Post #4958 of Memphis and two from his unit from the military honors program.

Online condolences may be sent to the Wayne Mathes family by logging onto Payne’s website at www.paynefuneralchapel.com.

Local arrangements were entrusted to the care of the Payne Funeral Chapel in Memphis assisted by the Pitts Funeral Home in Bolivar, Missouri.

Ely Samuel Parker

Ely Samuel Parker (Hasanoanda) was a Seneca Indian, born in 1828 on the Tonawanda Reservation in eastern New York.  As a young man he became Sachem of the Six Iroquois Nations, served as an intermediary for his people and was called Donehogawa.  In his youth, Ely S. Parker was educated at a missionary school and went on to college. He studied law, but the New York State law prohibited aliens from being admitted to the bar and Indians were not considered citizens. Parker then studied engineering, which he mastered with determination. In 1857 he was sent to Galena, Illinois as supervisor of government projects. In Galena he met Ulysses S. Grant, and the two formed an enduring friendship.  Parker’s engineering experience gained him a commission as a Captain in the Union Army during the Civil War, where he served as an engineer before becoming a member of General Grant’s personal staff.  In time he became Grant’s military secretary with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. It was Ely S. Parker’s excellent handwriting that copied the final draft of surrender terms accepted by Confederate General Robert E. Lee.  After the war, Parker received the rank of brevet brigadier general.  In 1869, after Grant was elected President, he appointed Parker as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the first Native American to hold the position. Parker resigned from government service after two years. After an unsuccessful business career, he spent his final years working for the New York City Police Department until his death in 1895.

From Jauflione Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution

« Older Entries