September 23, 2010

Downing Appreciation Days Winners Announced

Downing Appreciation Days Parade Results

The top three winners of the Adult Floats were: The Class of 65, Relay for Life, Happy Red Hatters.

The top two winners for the Youth Floats were: The Downing 4-H and the Girl Scouts.

The top two winners for the Church Floats were: The Downing Christian Church and the Downing Baptist Church.

The top winners for the Cars were: John and Shirley Hidy for the Oldest car, John and Shirley Hidy for the Best Restored car, Boyd and Jeannie Bissell for the Best Classic car, and John Cook for the Best Motorized car.

The top winners for the Horses were: Jonny Laws for the Best Hitch, and Carolyn and Sherey Stanley for the Best Showmanship, and the Coffey Ropers for the Largest Group.



Downing Appreciation Days Thursday Night Drawing

The winners of the drawing for the Thursday night festivities at Downing Appreciation Days were as follows: Rosalie Kinney won the $25 in cash donated by the Cheese Post, Don Scurlock won the greeting cards donated by the Scotland County Pharmacy, Barbara Farley won the Sierra Mist and Pepsi donated by Pepsi Cola, Bill Mobley won the pocket knife donated by Lancaster Lumber, Darron Mullinix won the $50 cash donated by Golden Furrow, the $25 gift certificate donated by Struble Antiques was won by Cindy Antal, Marilyn Blessing won the $10 cash donated by Beeler Motor Co., Curtis Schmitter won the Ovenware donated by Lancaster Body Works, Jenny Ruth won the Free Buffet to Shelly B's, Ellis Speer won the Chux Korn Hole donated by Bloomfield Pamida, Darlene Gunnell won the $25 gift certificate donated by J's Foods and the glass canister donated by Scotland County Hospital, Twila Anderson won the $10 cash donated by Don F. Harrison Insurance, Marilyn Blessing won the $20 cash donated by Steve Blessing Construction, Marshal Jackson won the Crescent Slip Pliers donated by Hamilton Produce, Margaret Mobley won three coupons for Wingstreet Wings and Cinnamon Sticks donated by Bloomfield Pizza Hut, David Lloyd won the $5 cash donated by Schuyler County Assessor Gary Stump, Phillis Whickler won the $25 cash donated by B&B Propane, Mark Antal won the $10 gift card to Keith's Foods, Alan Garrett won the box of shot gun shells donated by American Family Insurance, Jerry Scurlock won the $10 cash donated by Steve and Cindy Wilcox, Maudie Oliver won the Downing Christian Church Cookbook donated by Ruth Enterprises, Curtis Schmitter won the Cholesterol Screening coupon donated by the Schuyler County Health Department, Rose Baxter won the $25 cash donated by Jet Gas Corporation and the cap donated by Bloomfield Livestock, Leona Stice won the Wooden Mail Box donated by Clarence Kinney, Connie Ward won the $10 cash donated by Schuyler Recorder Judy Keim, Sue Jane Brewer won the Bar-B-Q Apron donated by MFA Oil, Rose Baxter and Tammy Ross won the 2 boot bags donated by Cook's Men's Store, Darron Mullinix won the John Deere Picture donated by Lancaster Flowers, Rose Baxter won the 4 free chicken meals donated by the Schuyler County Nutrition Site, John Cook won the T-shirt donated by KMEM and the cap donated by Kollision Korner, Jerry Scurlock won the $20 cash donated by the Scotland County Livestock Auction, Roberta Martin won the Surge Bar donated by Tri-County Electric, Twila Anderson won the $20 gift certificate donated by Tomboy Tools, Mark Antal won the $25 gift certificate donated by Nelson Electric, Don Scurlock won the $25 gift certificate donated by Feeds and Needs, Don Fincher won the bundle of work gloves donated by Farley's Trading Post, Doris Ketchum won the $30 cash donated by Off Road Tire and Service, and Chris Eastman won the $100 cash.



Downing Appreciation Days Friday Night Drawing

The winners of the Friday night drawing at Downing Appreciation Days were as follows: Don Fincher won the rug donated by Mobley Antiques, Louise Newland won the 24 pack of Mountain Dew donated by Pepsi-Cola, Charlotte Speer won the 30 piece set of Ovenware donated by Lancaster Custom Body Works, Ryan Orr won the $25 gift certificate donated by J's Foods, Alan Garrett and Sheri Laws won the 2 pocket knives donated by Lancaster Lumber, Ellis Speer won the $25 cash donated by the Cheese Post, Dorothy McElroy won the $10 gift certificate donate by "The Flower Garden" in Bloomfield, Glenice Roberts won the Bird Feeder donated by the Corner Grocery, Charles R. Cook won the Wooden Mail Box donated by Clarence Kinney, Rose Baxter won the Candle donated by the Daisy Patch, Faron Mullinix won the $15 cash donated by Steve and Penny Swindler, Bill Mobley won the $10 cash donated by Cornerstone Insurance, Vaughn Ruth and Phillis Whickler won the 2- 3 gift cards from Pizza Hut Bloomfield, Don Scurlock won the Surge Bar donated by Tri-County Electric, Dick Middleton won the Quilted Purse donated by Liz Reel, Gerold Lenki won the Cholesterol Screening Coupon donated by the Schuyler County Health Department, David Olson won the Cholesterol Screening Coupon donated by the Schuyler County Health Department, Randy Sayre won the $50 cash donated by Jet Gas Corporation, Ryan Orr won the $10 gift certificate donated by Keith's Foods, John Cook won the Vice Grips donated by Hamilton Produce and the Cap donated by Bloomfield Livestock Market, Rose Baxter won the Bird Feeder donated by Tom Reel, Barbara Ross won the $25 gift certificate donated by Feeds and Needs, Jonathan Holton won the Sweatshirt donated by Buddy's Place, Chris Eastman won the $10 gift certificate donated by Kourner Konnection, Clarence Kinney won the Corning Ware Dish donated by Pamida and Glass Canister donated by Scotland County Hospital, Lori Mullinix won the Purse Kit-Upholstery and Sew Forth Bloomfield, Ronald Shockley won a $25 gift certificate from Main Street Caf, Dianna Mullinix won $25 cash from the Community Bank of Memphis, Artis Comstock won at T-shirt from KMEM and a Cap from Kollision Korner, Carol Seamster won $20 cash from Scotland County Lanes, Jeff Bennett won a $25 gift certificate from Nelson Electric, Marshal Jackson won a $25 gift certificate from J's Foods, DeWayne Mullinix won a $20 gift certificate from Tomboy Tools, Glenice Roberts won the 36 piece Socket Set donated by Farley's Trading Post, Twila Anderson won a Book of Stamps donated the Darrell Harvey the Downing Postmaster, Marilyn Blessing won the $50 savings bond donated by Exchange Bank of Northeast Missouri in Lancaster, Darlene Gunnell won the Luggage donated by Cook's Men's Store, Liz Reel won the $200 cash.



Downing Appreciation Days Saturday Night Drawing

The winners for the Saturday night drawing at Downing Appreciation Days were as follows: Daron Mullinix won the $25 gift certificate donated by Feeds & Needs, Doran Herbert won the $25 cash donated by Bunder Hill Tommy Redding, Lester McElroy won the Wooden Mail Box donated by Clarence Kinney, Michelle Curry won the $10 worth of $2 bills donated by Carl Anderson, Lisa Wells won the 12 pack of Pepsi Products donated by Boondocks, Vanessa Whitacker won the Flower Arrangement donated by Countryside Flowers, Marilyn Blessing won the $25 cash donated by Poe Farms, Avis McBee won the Pocket Knife donated by Lancaster Flowers, Mrs. Ronald Shockley won the 6 months subscription donated by the Schuyler County Times, Cindy Antal won the Pocket Knife donated by Lancaster Lumber, Maudie Oliver won the Free Buffett to Shelly B's, Marilyn Blessing won the $25 cash donated by Curly Judd, Tammy Ross won the Indian Doll donated by Primrose Realty, Bill Mobley won the 6 months subscription donated by Schuyler County Times, Margaret Scurlock won the $20 gift certificate donated by Western's Meat Market, Amanda Stice won the $15 gift certificate donated by Dollar Wise Variety, Larry Ross won the Certificate for a Decorated Cake donated by Linda Blessing, Mark Antal won the Downing Christian Church Cookbook donated by Jim and Sue Jane Brewer, Larry Ross won the John Deere Tractor donated by Bloomfield/Centerville Equipment Inc., Phillis Whickler won the Carhartt Cooler donated by Cook's Men's Store, Margaret Mobley won the $10 gift certificate donated by "The Flower Shop" in Bloomfield, Jacob Olson won the Cholesterol Screening Coupon donated by the Schuyler County Health Department, Robert Gallagher won the 3 coupons donated by Bloomfield Pizza Hut, Barbara Ross won the Cholesterol Screening Coupon donated by the Schuyler County Health Department, Bill Mobley won the Box of Shotgun Shells donated by American Family Insurance, Marshal Jackson won the $10 cash donated by Linda Blessing, Ron Kirkpatrick won the $50 cash donated by B&B Propane, Carol Seamster won the 30 piece set of Ovenware donated by Lancaster Custom Body Works, Lester McElroy won the Dog Toy donated by Rose Hardware, DeWayne Mullinix won the Dog Toy donated by Rose Hardware, Jacob Olson won two 24 packs of Pepsi and Mountain Dew donated by Pepsi-Cola, Rose Baxter won the $25 gift certificate donated by J's Foods, Bill Mobley won the $25 gift certificate donated by J's Foods, Charlotte Speer won the $10 cash donated by US Cellular, Bea Fugate won the oil change donated by TND Automotive, Rose Baxter won the $50 cash donated by Fritz Gottman, Brian Whitworth won the Book of Stamps donated by Darrell Harvey the Downing Postmaster, Destery Spurgeon won the Crescent Rapid Slide Wrench donated by Hamilton Produce, Teresa Beeler won the $20 gift certificate donated by Tomboy Tools and Tammy Ross won the Canister donated by Scotland County Hospital, Carol Scurlock won the Fireworks donated by Fireworks Land, Larry Ross won the $20 cash donated by Schuyler County Collector Rothy Roberts, Chris Eastman won the $10 gift certificate donated by Keith's Foods and the cap donated by Kollision Korner, Romona Anders won the Windmill Picture donated by Toni Moore, Fred Havens won the Big Tool Set donated by Farley's Trading Post, James Farley won the $50 cash donated by the Cheese Post, Rosalie Kinney won the $50 savings bond donated by Exchange Bank of Northeast Missouri in Lancaster, Walter Burnett won the Picnic Table donated by Memphis Lumber, and Bobby Garrett won the $300 cash donated by Downing Appreciation Days.

Baby Delayna LouIda Schrock – A Heartwarming Miracle

Delayna LouIda Schrock of Memphis became one of the fewer than 200 infants nationwide each year to undergo a heart transplant. She is recovering well after her August 26th surgery in St. Louis.

Little Delayna LouIda Schrock has spent less than six hours of her young life in her hometown, but after a miraculous medical journey, her parents are hoping to be able to bring their daughter home for the first time next month.

Delayna was born at 10:51 a.m. on June 30th at Scotland County Hospital in Memphis. At 7 lbs and 2 ounces and 20 inches in length the newborn looked healthy, but right away there were issues with raising her body temperature, a problem that led to her transfer to the University of Missouri Women’s and Children’s Hospital in Columbia.

“Initially we thought it was a bacterial infection that was causing the issue, so it was treated with antibiotics,” said her father William Schrock.

The prognosis changed rather rapidly as doctors diagnosed heart abnormalities. Delayna suffered from a genetic disorder that had produced an abnormally large heart.

“The way it was explained to us, her heart was nearly twice as big as it should have been, and all of the extra muscle was acting like scar tissue, which was compressing her heart and keeping it from pumping properly,” explained William.

After less than a week in Columbia, Delayna was on a helicopter being transported to St. Louis Children’s Hospital in St. Louis, part of the Barnes-Jewish Hospital, BJC Healthcare group in St. Louis. Once there, she began a medication treatment in hopes of facilitating increased natural heart activity. But after two weeks the process was stopped, and her condition began to gradually deteriorate, and on July 25th she was placed on the heart transplant list, awaiting a possible donor.

A United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) report  stated that 33,610 organ transplants were performed in the US in 2016, and approximately 10% of those were heart transplants (3,191). A total of 292 organ transplants of any type were performed on children under the age of one, or less than 1% of all transplants.

“There were 130 heart transplants performed last year on patients under 1 year in age,” said Anne Paschke of UNOS. “On September 18th, there were 45 infants  waiting for a heart transplant.”

She indicated that St. Louis Children’s Hospital performed four of the state’s seven infant heart transplants in 2016

There is just one infant on Missouri’s heart transplant waiting list according to Paschke.

With the average wait time six months, the situation grew dire over the next several weeks as little Delayna’s health continued to worsen. Ultimately surgery was required to install a ECMO mechanical heart pump apparatus to manually pump blood through the six-week-old’s body.

Two additional surgeries were required to remove blood clots and less than two weeks into the pump process, further complications developed. The blood thinner required to allow the pumps to work was causing internal bleeding in little Delayna. She had nine blood transfusions in one day, but ultimately the pump had to be removed.

“At that point, basically everything medically that could be done for her, had been done,” said William. “It was up to her at that point whether she was going to make it or not.”

Based on her deteriorating condition, Delayna was removed from the transplant list.

Removed from her last medical lifeline, the little girl showed her own strength. Her chest remained opened from the previous surgeries, and this may have ultimately helped save the little one, as it likely helped relieve some of the pressure from the internal bleeding and fluid build ups that were compressing her heart and limiting its pumping ability.

A week after being taken off the transplant list, Delayna had grown strong enough for a second chance.

On her 7-week birthday, her parents William and Dianne announced the good news.

“There have been many ups and downs but she is strong and by the grace of God is doing well enough that we could relist her as a heart transplant recipient today after being off for a week,” they shared with friends on Facebook. “We would like to say thanks for the continued support and prayers we have received. This journey would be impossible without it.”

Then the difficult wait began.

According to the Pediatric Cardiology Journal, “Expressed as a rate, children awaiting heart transplantation experience the single highest waiting list mortality compared with all other age groups and all other solid organs in transplant medicine.”

Finally the phone rang around midnight on August 26th. A heart had become available.

“We don’t know where the heart came from,” said William. “It is all done anonymously through the transplant system. The only way to describe it is humbling.”

Delayna went into surgery prep at 8:45 a.m. Finally at approximately 7:30 p.m. she was out of surgery.

“It was around 11 p.m. that night when we finally got to see her for the first time,” said William.

The next family visit proved to be even more miraculous.

“It was simply amazing how fast she came back,” said William. “Less than 24 hours after surgery, she looked better than she ever had.”

Looks were not deceiving. Delayna was rapidly improving with the new heart. She remained in the ICU for just three weeks before being returned to regular floor status at the hospital.

“For the first time we can put clothes on her,” Dianne shared with her friends. “We have no idea when we’ll get to go home, but we are hoping to be out of the hospital by Thanksgiving.”

Apparently Delayna is in a bigger hurry to see home for the first time.

William said the family could possibly be leaving the hospital as soon as next week, albeit if only to stay together at the nearby Ronald McDonald House, which has been home to Diane and William since the first week of the ordeal.

“It will be the first step,” he said. “We’ll get to give Delayna her medicines and take care of her feeding tubes on our own.”

If all goes well there, it could mean the family could be back in Memphis as soon as the middle of October.

For the first three to six months, the Schrocks will have to keep their miracle baby fairly isolated from the public.

“We’ve been told to avoid large gatherings, even church, for several months because her immune system will not be capable of fighting off much of anything for a while,” said William.

But considering William and Diane have been home a grand total of four or five times since June 30th, and only for a few hours each trip, the family will gladly accept the restrictions.

“We have had tremendous support and I’m sure there will be plenty of people who will want to come and see her, so it will be hard at first to limit visitors,” said William.

William said the employees at his wholesale business in Memphis have been able to keep operations running in his stead.

Even with Medicaid picking up the majority of the anticipated millions of dollars in medical bills, the community has come together to help support the young couple and their two children. Donations are being accepted by the Potter’s House Mennonite Chapel of Downing. Contact Pastor Darrin Shank at 660-216-1870 if you would like to contribute. A GoFundMe account is being established for online contributions and the address will be announced when it becomes active.

Downing Board Working on Process to Remove Vacant Buildings

The Board of the City of Downing convened at 6 p.m. on September 11th with Mayor Alan Garrett presiding. Present were Aldermen Ray Bange, Gene Bruner, Bill Anderson, and Hannah Poe, City Clerk Carol Dryden, and Water/Waste Water Operator Larry Smith.

Copies of the agenda, minutes of the previous meeting, water/waste water report, deposits & disbursements and account balances were given to those present.

Mayor Alan Garrett called the meeting to order.

A motion to approve the agenda was made by Bill Anderson and seconded by Gene Bruner and carried unanimously.

A motion to approve the minutes from the previous meeting was made by Bill Anderson and seconded by Gene Bruner and carried unanimously.

A motion to approve the bills was made by Gene Bruner and seconded by Bill Anderson and carried unanimously.

Visitors: Tracey Gooden from Hawkins/Harrison Insurance came to talk about the city’s renewal policy. She brought two different quotes to see if the board wanted to keep the policy as is or raise the value. Bill Anderson made a motion to keep it the same as last year, and it was seconded by Gene Bruner and carried unanimously.

John Hills and Jim Lyon were present from Mark Twain to discuss putting new equipment on the water tower for better service to the people of and around Downing. They will be drawing up a new contract for the city. A motion to approve them putting up the new equipment was made by Gene Bruner and seconded by Ray Bange and carried unanimously.

Ben Gray, attorney came to discuss the process of getting people to let the city tear down the unlivable houses, He had a lot of good information and the city will move forward on the project.

Water/Waste Water Report: Discussed getting some new meters. Larry is looking into the prices of buying in different quantities.

Street Maintenance: Larry had been working on the roads and getting more rock. We should be about done with the rock for this year.

Old Business: Ameren can’t fix the light we asked about as there is no transformer for it.

New Business.: I wanted to buy some totes to put old files for storage and Bill Anderson will donate those to me. We had a call in regard to a sidewalk, they wanted to know if there was an ordinance which says they have to maintain the sidewalk or can they remove it. There is no ordinance stating they have to have a sidewalk so it can be removed.

Positive Thoughts: The Board feels they are making some headway to improving the town.

A motion to adjourn the meeting at 8:30 was made by Bill Anderson and seconded by Ray Bange and carried unanimously.

Submitted by Carol Dryden, City Clerk

Trash Truck Driver Hurt in Accident

A trash truck operator was injured in a one vehicle accident on private property in Scotland County at 2:20 p.m. on September 13th. The accident occurred off of Highway 15, four miles south of Memphis.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Robert L. Hall, 40, was hurt when the 2010 Mac Trash Truck he was driving struck a bump in the roadway, causing damage to the vehicle’s undercarriage and injuring the driver.

Hall suffered moderate injuries in the accident and was transported by Scotland County Ambulance to Scotland County Hospital.

The Patrol was assisted at the scene by the ambulance service and the Scotland County Sheriff’s office.

Red Cross to Host Two Local Blood Drives in October

Area residents will have a pair of opportunities in October to donate blood at American Red Cross blood drives.

Healthy individuals are needed every day to maintain an adequate blood supply for patients in need.

Make an appointment and encourage your family and friends to donate on Tuesday, October 3rd from 1:30-6:00 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Memphis.

If you can’t make that date, a second drive will be held October 6th from 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. at Scotland County Hospital.

Once a donor has made the commitment to give blood, it is important to take a few simple steps to prepare and help ensure a good donation experience.

The Red Cross recommends: getting a good night’s sleep; eating a good breakfast or lunch; drinking extra water and fluids to help replace the volume you will donate; avoiding caffeinated beverages; and eating iron-rich foods to boost your iron level.

Donating blood is an easy way to help others and only takes about an hour of your time. The Red Cross encourages donors to give blood every time they are eligible: every 56 days for whole blood donations and every 112 days for double red cell donations.

Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental permission in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet. certain height and weight requirements.

The American Red Cross provides shelter, food and clothing to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; ministers international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at blog.redcross.org.

The need is constant. The gratification is instant. Give blood.

Ministerial Alliance Planning Coat Drive in October

The Scotland County Ministerial Alliance (SCMA) met September 13 at the St. Paul Lutheran Church in Memphis. Those present were Mark Appold, Karen Biggs, Dan Hite, Diane Koontz and Jack Sumption.

It was announced that a coat drive will be coming in October. The Fall Coat drive will begin Monday, October 2nd continuing until Friday, October 20th. Drop-off locations will be the Nutrition Sire, SCR-I Elementary and the Clothes Closet.  Clean, usable coats for all ages are needed.

It is hoped that there can be more pastoral presence at the food distribution days.

Wednesday, September 27th is “See you at the Pole Day”. Anyone interested in participating the prayer time can  meet at the SCR-I High School flag pole at 8 a.m. The SCR-I Fellowship of Christian Athletes is hosting the event. The group’s sponsors are Nathaniel Orr and Laura Ewing, assisted by Troy Barrett and Josiah Holloway.

Upcoming SCMA events include the Tiger Trail Fun Run on September 23, starting at 8:00 a.m.  The SCMA Thanksgiving Service is scheduled for November 19 at 7 p.m. at the SCR-I Elementary School gym. The Thanksgiving event will be organized more completely at the November SCMA meeting. For more information on any of these upcoming events, please contact Dan Hite or Jack Sumption.

Squire Childers Legacy Lives on at Annual Grist Mill Grinding

The Childers family members and friends serving on the mill crew took time after working at the grist mill to pose for a photo.

As Hurricane Irma swept into Florida on September 9, 2017, 72 family members, friends and neighbors gathered at the Childers home in Sandhill to again revive the legacy of Squire Childers. The old grist mill ran again, grinding corn into corn meal and wheat into graham flour, as it has done for many years

A crew of dedicated workers transferred the grain into the hopper and did the bagging while many others enjoyed watching the process. When the grinding was completed, Victor Childers, grandson of Squire Childers, asked the blessing on the meal, which Elaine Forrester and the crew from the Rutledge School Restoration group, had provided. After the wonderful meal the afternoon was spent visiting, catching up on family news and making new friends

Those arriving from out of state were Victor Childers and daughter, Jean Childers-Arnold, husband Richard Arnold and children; Theo and Eva Childers-Arnold of Indianapolis, IN and daughter Kathaine Childers-Martin and husband, Larry Martin of Jacksonville, FL; Marjorie Delaney and Gregory Delaney, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL; John and Sue Guio, DeKaib, IL; Neil and Rhonda Hoover, Taylorville, IL; Ron and Rachel Hance, Auburn, WA;

Those from Missouri who were in attendence include Paul Slater, Bridgeton; Earl and Cindi Burgdorf, St Louis; Joe Matlick, O’Fallon; Johnny and Carol Matlick, Wentzville; Adam Childers-Arnold, Diane Johnson, Dennis Goodman, Kirksville; Jordan Pellerito, Joe Forrester, Al and Jeanne Diamond, Columbia; Mark Forrester, Scott and Beth Kasper, Kansas City; Pat Berthold, Cletus Berthotd, Wheatland, David Berthold, Camdenton; Jim Washeck, St Peters; Tanner Hawkins, T. Hawkins, Winfield; Steve McPherson, LaBelle; Gwen Laudwig, Greentop; Maurine Robinson, Arbela; Jim and Alisa Kigar, Eli and Elise, Bible Grove.

Those there from Memphis were Ruth Ann Carnes, Sterling and Elaine Forrester, Lucus Thompson, Scott and Angela Westhoff, Kim Nicoli, Marjorie Peterson, Betty Lodewegen, Leon and Marlena Trueblood, Mitch and Nancy McClamroch. Those from Rutledge were John and Beverly Cole, Leroy and Jane Huff, Bob Hunolt, Oren and Celina Erickson, Dale and Judy Good and Kristy, Martin Guinn, Reva Husted, Bob and Angela Neese and Opal Blaine.

Milton Creamery Continuing Tradition of Locally Made Award-Winning Cheeses

Milton Creamery’s Prairie Breeze cheese was an award winner at the 2017 American Cheese Society national competition in Denver, CO.

The Milton Creamery recently brought home two awards from the 2017 American Cheese Society Convention in Denver, CO where nearly 300 cheese producers from across the United States, Canada, Mexico and Columbia enter more than 2,000 cheeses for competition.

The company’s trademark Prairie Breeze added to its award pedigree, earning third place in the aged cheddar category at the ACS event. It had already brought home blue ribbons from the ACS in 2009 and 2011 and also was a top performer at the 2009 US Cheese Championship and the World Cheese Contest in 2010 in London.

Prairie Breeze is a well-aged white Cheddar style cheese, aged for a minimum of 9 months (the contest category called for cheeses aged 12-24 months). It is made with Vegetarian Rennet and no added color.

The local product is described as sweeter than the typical cheddar with lots of flavor, crumbly yet creamy with a little crunch from the Tyrosine crystals developed during the aging process.

But the Milton Creamery was not done there. The local producer also earned a third place award for its Quark entry.

Quark is a fresh, unripened cheese made with cow’s milk. It is described as having a smooth texture, making the mild and slightly tangy in flavor cheese a popular spread. It is often substituted for cottage cheese, or cream cheese or sour cream even.

The Milton Creamery was founded in 2006 by Rufus and Jane Musser. The family fostered a working arrangement with area Amish dairy farms, a partnership that has secured quality milk, the most important building block for fine cheeses.

Milton Creamery’s signature cheese was only in production for one year when it won the company’s first award, Prairie Breeze won a blue ribbon at the U.S. Cheese Championship, as the Best of Class in the open hard class.

The company’s popularity on the judge’s circuit has carried over to business, which is booming. The high demand has led to expansion at the Creamery, with the possibility of even more as space continues to be an issue as the Creamery considers expanding the award-winning Quark line along with the Old Style Cheddar and 4 Alarm Cheddar. With nearly 20 employees, the company continues to grow its workforce as well to meet the increased demands.

Milton Creamery also Ages and markets Flory’s Truckle, an award winning, aged clothbound cheddar cylinder, which was a 2016 first place finisher at the ACS.

The company also produces a number of special cheddar cheese varieties, including Garden Vegetable, Tomato Garlic, Chlli Pepper, 4 Alarm Cheddar and Black Pepper as well as a variety of colby cheeses, including smoked and old style. Another popular product produced by the Creamery are the cheese curds, which come in nine different varieties – curds with chives, smoked, cheddar, olive, dill, Cajun, onion and parsley, tomato garlic, chili pepper and pizza curds.

Customers can purchase cheese online at the Creamery’s website, miltoncreamery.com or can stop by the retail store at the facility, located just west of the Highway 15 and Highway 2 junction near Milton, IA.

Memphis High School Class of 1957 Holds 60-year Reunion 

The Class of 1957 of Memphis High School had their 60th class reunion luncheon at noon on September 16, 2017 at the Scotland County Fitness Center in Memphis, MO.

The delicious meal was catered by Elaine Forrester and served by Elaine and other members of the Rutledge School Restoration Committee.

Those attending to enjoy the food, fellowship and reminiscing were class members: L-R-1st Row: Nelda (Rudy) Billups, Mary Lou (McGee) Myers, Sharon (McPherson) Miller, Sterling Forrester, Stanley Myers, and Dale Ruth.

L-R-2nd Row: Golda (Woods) Seybold, Marilyn (Newland) Blessing, Kay (Daggs) Eggleston, Luzonne Darr, Lucille Campbell, Charlotte (Huston) Rylander, Darlene (Anderson) Woods, and Richard Roberts.

L-R-3rd Row: Verna (Alexander) Weilbrenner, Richard Adams, Don McVay, Elwayne Harris, Charlotte (Tague) Payne, Wayne Martin, and Minor Tuck.

Others attending were David Miller, Elaine Forrester, Beverly Myers, Barb Ruth, Junior Blessing, Lowell Woods, Kathy Roberts, LaVern Weilbrenner, Joanne Adams, and Shirley Harris.

Wires Crossed

Have you ever been kind of confused in life? Maybe your ‘ying’ doesn’t jive with your ‘yang’? Well… after you read my letter to Mr. Chris Feeney, The Editor of this publication, you’re really going to be confused! Your proverbial ‘wires’ may be crossed!

Now… you’ve got to let your mind kind of drift back in time, along with my mind, to see what I mean. Drifting… Drifting… Drifting back to that time I took my mean, wayward, black with a white blaze on his face, gelding to a horse trainer/whisperer.

About two weeks later, I stopped by to see how my ill-natured horse, Diablo, was coming along.

“Well, how is he doing” Makin’ any progress? Horse Whisperer; “Actually, I’m just in the ‘melding’ process right now,” he said.

“Oh”

“Yep”, Horse Whisperer.

“Well, I just wondered if you got him broke of some of his bad habits.” I said.

Horse Whisperer: “Mister, you’re just not spiritual enough to understand. Ya see, nothing that this equine friend does, is really his fault!”

“Is that right?” I mumbled.

Horse Whisperer: “That’s right. This here hoss is kind of confused, that’s all. It’s like he’s getting too many mixed signals. What exactly do you expect Diablo to do, anyway?”

“It’s what I want him to quit doin’!” I barked. “I just want ‘ole Diablo there, to quit biting, kicking, spooking and throwing me! I also would prefer it if he would get past that stiff legged trot of his when we leave the barn and then run like a ’Custer Cavalry Charge’ when we go home, dragging me beneath thorn branches! That’s all.”

Horse Whisperer: “Mister, this poor, innocent animal is just confused. Them laid back ears of his is a cry for understanding! Why, Diablo has his wires crossed!”

That is when I whispered in the Horse Whisperer’s rather large attentive left ear, “If Diablo doesn’t quit his damn ornery, obstinate, stubborn ways, you might see him described as an ingredient in a can of Alpo dog food some day!”

It didn’t do any good. I still have good ‘ole Diablo*, living sumptuously on my pastures. (*The name is changed to protect the guilty.)

So, years later, I got to thinkin’ (I’ve got to hold my tongue just right when I do), what does having your wires crossed mean anyway? So I asked my Aunt Margaret.

My Aunt Margarett was a telephone switch board operator for many years. ‘Back in the day’ when long distance phone calls were actually connected by plugging in one line into another line on a switchboard. Occasionally a mistake would be made when the operator hooked up the wrong lines! This sometimes resulted in some mixed up conversations! When one party thought they were speaking to Aunt Mabel in Denver, but actually had a connection with O’Malley’s Pub in Boston! Yeah, there were some confusing conversations, that often would bring out the ‘Baptist’ in Aunt Mabel, and the ‘Irish’ temper would flare at O’Malley’s!

This is where the phrase “getting your wires crossed” probably originated, according to Aunt Margaret anyway. And I think she is right about this. She usually is right about most things. It is a saying, that now applies to almost any situation, that is confounded by misunderstood meanings. Or, when one is bewildered, by observing that what a person or group says is contrary to their actions. Take for example, the blatant actions and behavior of Anarchists and radical Antifa rioters and looters at U.C. Berkeley, California. What happened to free speech? I mean, why do they have to maim people and destroy everything, just because ‘Milo’ somebody wants to give a speech on campus? They have their wires crossed!

Now, personally, I wouldn’t drive to Arbela to hear Milo, but I would support the right of the folks in Arbela, to have the right to hear what he has to say. And that goes for Maxine Waters, too. I mean, I personally would rather dig post holes in the hot, burning, blistering sun, than to listen to her hateful bellering drivel!

But, that’s just me. Now if you want to have Maxine come to speak to your quilting group… go for it! Or Jeremiah Wright for that matter.

The point is, how can the students of U.C. Berkeley (by the way, U.C. Berkeley is like the ”Mother Ship” to many in Scotland County) proclaim ‘love, not war’ while at the same time ‘screen’ the Antifa rioters?

I saw one video of a nice young lady, who had an opposing view, get sprayed in the face with pepper spray by a professor!

I get my own wires crossed (like when you get the jumper cables backward on the battery!) when I see innocent unborn babies being aborted and their body parts being sold by heartless Planned Parenthood shills!

I think both Hillary and Bernie really had their wires crossed, when they both gleefully explained, during debates, how in their confused view, it was great to abort late term babies because “they don’t have constitutional rights”! I think this tipped the scales against them.

And when protesters of a pipeline leave tons of filth and trash, while at the same time proclaiming “save the planet”! Bad connection.

I think politicians of every stripe have ‘crossed wires’ when they lie through their teeth about one thing, and then do another.

But that’s just my opinion. The thing about my crowd (which seems like 11 or 12 sometimes, but I know is much bigger) is, we may disagree with someone, but would “fight to the death” for their right to express their views.

And just one more, then I’ll quit. What the hell is the big deal, all of a sudden, about civil war statues and monuments, put up by Democrats for the most part? I mean, damn! We’ve achieved women’s suffrage, civil rights, work place standards, and much more while these statues have commemorated the most terrible conflict in our history! Why stir up the muck now? Their wires are crossed! That’s why!

I, for one, simply have to go back to a source that has stood the test of time, the Bible, to get my own connections straightened out.

Take for example Matthew 5:37: “But let your ‘yes’ be ‘yes’, and your ‘no’ be ‘no’. For whatever is more than these is from the evil one.”

Paraphrased: “Say what you mean, and mean what you say!”

Davis M. Burrus

Aldridge Represents SCR-I at American Legion Boys States

WARRENSBURG, MO – Kyle Austin Aldridge participated in The American Legion Boys State of Missouri June 17-24 on the campus of the University of Central Missouri in Warrensburg. Aldridge was selected based on his leadership, citizenship, academics, and character during his junior year at Scotland County R-I High School.

Boys State is a pure democracy in that all citizens may vote and are eligible to hold office. The program is designed to educate and train Missouri’s young leaders in functional citizenship, leadership and government. Nearly 1,000 student leaders build an entire state government in a single week.

Accomplishments, positions held, and awards earned by Aldridge at Missouri Boys State include: Citizen of Carver City;

Member of the Nationalist Party; Assistant City Clerk; City Clerk; Delegate to State Convention, Ward III and appeared on the ballot for House of Representatives. Aldridge attended Public Administration School while participating in Boys State.

Aldridge (son of Randall and Jenny Aldridge) was sponsored by American Legion Post 219 – Memphis. Sponsors afford the opportunity for students to participate in this nationally recognized program and are critical to its continued success. Organizations, businesses, and individuals interested in becoming a sponsor are encouraged to contact the Missouri Boys State Headquarters at 1-877-342-5627.

The Boys State staff is comprised of educational, legal, professional, and civic leaders who volunteer their time each year. Missouri Boys State is a 501(c)(3) organization and is a Missouri American Legion program.

Students who are juniors during the 2017-18 academic year and are interested in participating should contact their High School Counselor and visit the Missouri Boys State website at www.moboysstate.org. The 2018 session will be held June 16-23. Informational presentations by a Boys State staff member are available to schools and organizations by contacting Bettie Rusher at the Missouri Boys State Headquarters at 1-877-342-5627 or email bettie.rusher@moboysstate.org.

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