March 11, 2010

Council Approves Sale of Former City Hall Building

Patrons that have found it hard to break the habit of traveling to the southwest corner of the Memphis square to pay their utility bills, will soon be able to do so once again, well that is if they are U.S. Cellular customers.

Local agent Scott Wickert recently finalized an agreement with the City of Memphis to purchase the former city hall building, located on the south end of the west side of the city square.

The building had been vacant since July 2008 when the city officially moved into its new $365,000 facility donated to the City of Memphis by Bob and Renetta Rockhold.

Wickert will be relocating his business, Scotts Cellular to the former city hall building. He recently sold his appliance business to Jesse Ketchum of Ketchum Heating and Cooling, who will continue to operate at the former site of Scotts Home Center on the south side of the square.

The city had listed the building for sale for the past year. The site had been considered as a possible economic development asset in efforts to attract a manufacturer to the community, but those negotiations never fully materialized.

Wickert indicated he would like to have his move completed to the new storefront by May 1st.

BABY BOUDREAU

Abe and Jessica Boudreau of Kahoka are the parents of a son, Ervin Paul Joseph Boudreau, born June 11, 2018 at 4:16 p.m. at Scotland County Hospital in Memphis. Ervin weighed 7 lbs 12 oz and was 22.5 inches long. Grandparents are Chris and Paula Montgomery of Memphis; and David and Pam Boudreau of Kahoka.

BABY ALLEN

 

Shawna Allen of Kahoka is the mother of a daughter, Charlea Lane Allen, born June 8, 2018 at 7:30 a.m. at Scotland County Hospital in Memphis. Charlea weighed 9 lbs 3 oz and was 22 inches long. She is welcomed home by a sister, Adlea. Grandparents are Travis and Nichole Allen of Kahoka; Charley and Gloria Allen of Kahoka; Shelly Hempen of Hamilton, IL and Mike Hempen of Donnellson, IA.

Rutledge Renegades

John and Sue Guio and Joe Forrester came for Bernice Forrester’s funeral.

Martin Guinn and Reva Hustead went to LaGrange for Travis Wagy’s baseball game.

Jenny and Randy Walker and Penny Hustead and grandsons, Will and Waid, celebrated their mother’s, Reva Hustead, birthday (June 19), along with Martin Guinn, at a restaurant in Palmyra.

Neta Phillips went to Columbia.  Another day, she went to Kirksville.

Some of those in this week were Dale Tague, Don Tague, Larry Tague, Neta Phillips, Neal and Dawn Kirkpatrick, Ronnie and Bonnie Young, Martin Guinn, Reva Hustead, Oren and Celina Erickson, Bob and Dorothy Hunolt, Dixie and Waverly Bunting, Emmett and Maxine Phillips, Larry and Deanna Hubbard, Keith and Marilyn Dunn, and Milt Clary.

NANCY S. EAVES (9/15/1938 -6/14/2018)

Nancy S. Eaves, 79, passed away at her home in Memphis, MO at 11:10 p.m. Thursday, June 14, 2018.

She was born on September 15, 1938 in Macomb, IL, the daughter of Morris William “Bill” Hill and Jeannette Cobb Hill Bucher. She married Gerald Eaves. He survives.

Nancy earned her practical nursing degree and worked in that capacity for several years before serving as Hancock County Illinois Assessor. She also operated her own insurance and realty business for many years in Dallas City, Illinois. In 1979 Nancy was listed in “Who’s Who of American Women”. She was a member of the Memphis Red Hat Society. She was the first female president of the Dallas City Lions Club. She enjoyed writing, and had several of her stories published in Farm Wife News. Nancy liked fishing, sewing, painting, crocheting, playing the guitar and mandolin, and bluegrass music. She loved her family and many friends.

Nancy is survived by her husband, Gerald; one son, Kelly Eaves of Fort Madison, IA; three daughters, Dianna Marie Clark of Bettendorf, IA, Sheila Marie (Michael) Smith of Revere, MO, Sherry (Clyde) Martin of Montrose, IA; 13 grandchildren, Colton Eaves of Iowa City, IA, Kristyn Eaves of Fort Madison, Tom (Sabrina) Clark of Des Moines, IA, Bill Clark of Liberty, IL, Katie Clark of Ankeny, IA, Michael (Sara) Smith of Revere, MO, Athena (Brandon) Duncan of Kahoka, MO, Ben (Bambi) Smith of Farmington, IA, JR (Nora) Smith of Kahoka, MO, Jennifer (Travis) Knox of Decatur, IL, Laura (Ed) Conley of Keokuk, IA, Joe (Kristy) Martin of Keokuk, IA, Tyler (Michelle) Martin of Donnellson, IA; 11 great-grandchildren; one brother, Jerald (Judith) Hill of Savannah, MO; and several nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents; great-granddaughter, Lexie Christine Smith; and one brother, Thomas Hill.

A funeral service was held Tuesday, June 19, 2018 at Banks & Beals Funeral Home in Dallas City, IL with Dan Hite officiating. Burial followed in the Harris Cemetery near Dallas City.

A visitation was held prior to the service Tuesday.

A memorial fund has been established. Please visit banksandbeals.com to leave a condolence and sign the guest book.

Korean War

Korea, a former Japanese possession, was divided along the 38th parallel into zones of occupation after World War II. U.S. forces accepted the surrender of Japan in southern Korea, while the Soviet Union did the same in northern Korea.  A promise was made by U.S. and British leaders to restore Korea as an independent nation following the end of the war.  Although the U.S. and the Soviets had both pledged to help form a unified Korea, the tension between the two countries prevented the promise from being fulfilled.  The temporary division soon became permanent, with the United States becoming a main source of financial and military support for the democratic Republic of South Korea, which was recognized by the United Nations. The Soviet Union assisted North Korea in becoming a communist regime. On June 25, 1950, communist armed forces from North Korea invaded South Korea, setting off the Korean War.  United Nations members were called upon to come to the aid of South Korea. President Truman promptly ordered American air and ground forces into Korea.  After Communist China came to the aid of North Korea, the conflict had the potential to become another world war. Commanding Gen. Douglas McArthur favored expanding the war and was replaced.  The Korean War, known in the U.S. as a police action, continued for three years, ending with an armistice on July 27, 1953. No official peace treaty was ever signed. Almost 40,000 Americans died in action in Korea, and more than 100,000 were wounded.

From Jauflione Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution

Scotland County Commission Meeting Minutes

Thursday, May 31, 2018

PLACE OF MEETING: Scotland County Courthouse Commission Chambers

The meeting was called to order at 8:30 a.m.

PRESENT WERE:  Presiding Commissioner, Duane Ebeling; Eastern District Commissioner, Danette Clatt; Western District Commissioner, David Wiggins; and County Clerk, Batina Dodge.

Commissioner Wiggins moved to approve the consent agenda; seconded by Presiding Commissioner Ebeling. Motion carried 3-0.

The minutes from May 30, 2018 were presented. Commissioner Clatt moved to approve the regular session minutes; seconded by Presiding Commissioner Ebeling. Motion carried 3-0.

The Commission audited and signed checks.

Nevin Horning discussed Ordinance 09-01 with the Commission.

Richard Briggs discussed brush removal on County Road 512 with the Commission.

Kevin Trapp, engineer for the City of St. Louis, contacted the Commission to negotiate a trade of BRO and Soft-Match Funds.  An agreement was made that the City of St. Louis would give $400,000 BRO Funds to Scotland County in return for $400,000 of Scotland County’s Soft-Match Funds.

Seeing no further business, Presiding Commissioner Ebeling adjourned the meeting at 12:00 p.m.

The Scotland County Commission adjourned to meet in regular session on Wednesday, June 6, 2018.

 

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

PLACE OF MEETING: Scotland County Courthouse Commission Chambers

The meeting was called to order at 8:30 a.m.

PRESENT WERE:  Presiding Commissioner, Duane Ebeling; Eastern District Commissioner, Danette Clatt; Western District Commissioner, David Wiggins; and County Clerk, Batina Dodge.

Commissioner Wiggins moved to approve the consent agenda; seconded by Presiding Commissioner Ebeling. Motion carried 3-0.

The minutes from May 31, 2018 were presented. Commissioner Clatt moved to approve the regular session minutes; seconded by Commissioner Wiggins. Motion carried 3-0.

Kathy Kiddoo, Treasurer, presented a monthly settlement of funds.

Ryan Clark, Road and Bridge Supervisor, discussed current projects with the Commission.  The Commission also approved replacement of the radio antennae that was damaged by lightening.

The Commission approved a letter of intent to participate in the State’s FY2019 CART rock program.

The Commission reviewed overtime reports prepared by Nancy McClamroch, Deputy County Clerk.

The Commission signed court order 2-2018.

Commencement paperwork for a low water crossing replacement on County Road #405 was signed and returned to MoDOT for processing.

Seeing no further business, Presiding Commissioner Ebeling adjourned the meeting at 12:00 p.m.

The Scotland County Commission adjourned to meet in regular session on Thursday, June 7, 2018.

 

Thursday, June 7, 2018

PLACE OF MEETING: Scotland County Courthouse Commission Chambers

The meeting was called to order at 8:30 a.m.

PRESENT WERE:  Presiding Commissioner, Duane Ebeling; Eastern District Commissioner, Danette Clatt; Western District Commissioner, David Wiggins; and County Clerk, Batina Dodge.

Commissioner Clatt moved to approve the consent agenda; seconded by Commissioner Wiggins. Motion carried 3-0.

The minutes from June 6, 2018 were presented. Commissioner Wiggins moved to approve the regular session minutes; seconded by Presiding Commissioner Ebeling. Motion carried 3-0.

The Commission audited and signed checks.

Batina Dodge, County Clerk, presented budget reports.

Presiding Commissioner Ebeling left at 9:35 a.m. and returned at 11:15 a.m.

The Commission approved invoice #170195-010-11 to SKW for engineering services on Bridge #2170011.

The Commission approved the soft-match credit request to MoDOT for Bridge #2170011.

Ryan J. Phelps and Harry Bozoian of Klinger and Associates presented the firm’s qualifications to the Commission.

Seeing no further business, Presiding Commissioner Ebeling adjourned the meeting at 12:00 p.m.

The Scotland County Commission adjourned to meet in regular session on Wednesday, June 13, 2018.

 

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

PLACE OF MEETING: Scotland County Courthouse Commission Chambers

The meeting was called to order at 8:30 a.m.

PRESENT WERE:  Presiding Commissioner, Duane Ebeling; Eastern District Commissioner, Danette Clatt; Western District Commissioner, David Wiggins; and County Clerk, Batina Dodge.

Commissioner Clatt moved to approve the consent agenda; seconded by Presiding Commissioner Ebeling. Motion carried 3-0.

The minutes from June 6, 2018 were presented. Commissioner Wiggins moved to approve the regular session minutes; seconded by Presiding Commissioner Ebeling. Motion carried 3-0.

Ryan Clark, Road and Bridge Supervisor, discussed current projects with the Commission.

The Commission was notified by MoDOT that Bridge #120 located on County Road 961 was recommended for closure due to heavy section loss to end post and gusset plates on the northeast side of the bridge.  The Commission agreed that the bridge will be closed.

Seeing no further business, Presiding Commissioner Ebeling adjourned the meeting at 12:00 p.m.

The Scotland County Commission adjourned to meet in regular session on Thursday, June 14, 2018.

Hallowed Ground

It had been several weeks since I last visited a favorite hunting area. It was early spring, and the new growth had just started coming up. I tried to get an early start on upkeep by weed-eating around the barn and down a rarely used road that led up the hill. I was hoping to make some progress on the maintenance that would have to be done before the next season.  I usually wait until the last minute and only do what absolutely must be done in order to hunt. It seems every year I spend most of my time keeping the weeds and limbs from closing in a little more on my hunting area. And it seems I never fully accomplish that task. The paths are narrower, the site windows are smaller, and the trees keep encroaching on my once roomy spread. I wanted this year to be different, but since my last visit, I’ve already been taken over by vines, weeds, and limbs. It’s only been a few weeks, but this has been plenty of time for the weeds to begin to choke out one of my all-time favorite hunting areas. I’ll gather up my chainsaw and weed-eater and make the trip this week. The fight for property rights is on!

I know of no better picture of many lives today. Neglect has caused some of the most important things in life to be choked out. What was once maintained and protected, has now become swallowed up by so many things that have no value. What was once hallowed ground has now become only a memory of some previous activity. The weeds have become so numerous, we simply become weed farmers than take the effort to eradicate them and return to the worthwhile crop we once produced. Why do we give in? Because it takes time and effort to rid the worthless things from the worthwhile ones. But it must be done. Have you noticed a particular area in your life that is being swallowed up by worthless things? It will always be the area you have neglected. To neglect one worthless thing for another is of no consequence, but to neglect something of great value will not only cause it to be strangled by insignificant things, it will ultimately cause you to lose something you may never get back. Take the time to do maintenance on the most important things in your life and they will be there when you need them the most.

 

Gary Miller

Outdoor Truths Ministries

www.outdoortruths.org

Living Life Over

FIVE YEARS AGO

The 13th Annual Scotland County Relay for Life helped raise more than $15,000 for the American Cancer Society’s battle against cancer.

A total of 49 cancer survivors joined forces to make the first circuit around the square as the traditional Survivor’s Lap kicked off the night-long relay around the track.

More than 400 luminaries were lit in memory of cancer victims, providing a somber reflection on why the Relays are so important.

Spokesperson, Stephen E. Schroeder, praised the community support for the event and throughout the fundraising efforts of the teams to help make the 2013 Relay a success.

TEN YEARS AGO

Friday the 13th proved very unlucky for a Scotland County landmark.  According to the Gorin Fire Department, a lightning strike is believed to have sparked a blaze that destroyed the Harmony Grove Baptist Church in rural Scotland County.

The fire was reported at approximately 1:30 a.m. when a neighbor reported the blaze in its later stages.  The structure was totally consumed by flames when emergency responders arrived at the scene.

The church, constructed in 1837, was a total loss.  The facility was made famous as the home church of one of Scotland County’s most famous daughters, Ella Ewing.

Plans are already underway to rebuild the church, which serves the Gorin and Rutledge communities.

20 YEARS AGO

The following students were honored at the Sixth Grade Graduation services held May 21st at the Scotland County Elementary School:

Brandi Blakeburn, Max Briggs, Andrew Bulen, Gary Cochenour, Jessie Cotton, Clint Cottrell, Corvin Drummond, Sara Eggleston, Jason Findling, Holly Frederick, Keil Fogle, Jacqueline Fuller, Nathaniel Gerth, Matthew Glass, Tasha Glover, Andy Graham, Tina Graham, Jeff Harbourn, Chase Hines, Cody Holt, Jon Keller, Emily Kiddoo, Brandi Mallett, Rebecca Miller, Thomas Miller, Elizabeth Monroe, Cheryl Mosley, Joel Myers, Patrick O’Donnell, Nick Oldham, Travis Onken, Mandy Orton, Shana Reese, James Rhodes, Tim Robinson, Chris Rule, Katie Schneider, Jenna Shalley, Danielle Shelley, Torn Skinner, Andrew Tague, Greg Wiley, Nicholas Winn, Carl Wittstock, Bradley Wood, and Sean Woods.

30 YEARS AGO

Scotland County Historical Society is pleased to announce the depot is in place on the Downing House grounds, thanks to the efforts, hard work and financial support of many individuals, businesses, clubs, and local organizations.  A project of this sort can only succeed through the support and combined effort of everyone.

Work has begun on exterior restoration.  Anyone interested in contributing labor, materials, or financial support in this renovation is urged to visit the site or contact any Historical Society member.

40 YEARS AGO

Thieves took new baseballs valued at $60, miscellaneous candy bars and gum, and two cases of pop from the snack stand at the baseball field sometime Thursday, June 15.

Entry was apparently gained by using a steel fence post to pry open the door, breaking the lock.  The door was extensively damaged and will probably have to be replaced.

Funds for summer baseball are derived from fees paid by the players and the proceeds of the snack stand.  This loss will be extremely hard to make up during the summer program as profits from the snack stand are marginal.

50 YEARS AGO

Mark Drummond, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Drummond, while he and several children were playing at the Vinol Lawson home, fell from a horse striking his chin on an ax.  He was taken to the office of Dr. Brun where it required several stitches to close the wound.

At a recent meeting of the Memphis Business and Professional Association, it was voted to close businesses Thursday afternoon and Friday afternoon, July 25th and 26th.

The purpose of the closing is to help to promote the Scotland County Fair which will be in session at that time.

60 YEARS AGO

On next Thursday, Friday and Saturday, June 26, 27, and 28, the merchants of Memphis, under the auspices of the Memphis Retail Merchants’ Association, are holding City-Wide Dollar Days in Memphis.

Bargains galore, courteous service, and extensive stocks will be the order of the day for each and every day.

The Dollar Days promotion is one of several such promotions sponsored by the Memphis Retail Merchants’ Association.  Each promotion is under the chairmanship of different members of the organization.  The Dollar Day committee is composed of Stanley Frkovich, Linn Sinley, and Madelyn Simerl.

Closing hours of stores have been discussed at recent meetings and a poll of the group showed that many Memphis businesses close at 5 p.m. except groceries and the variety stores and a few others.  Beginning June 30 groceries and variety stores will close at 5:30, according to recent action taken by the group.

70 YEARS AGO

In a game between showers, Colony defeated Rutledge All-Stars, 8 to 7 on Sunday.

Bill See of Colony was the star of the ball game.  He got a single and double in four times at bat.  After catching a fine game for seven innings, he came in and pitched the last two innings, stopping a Rutledge rally in the ninth with the tying run on second.

McCabe was the standout ball player for Rutledge, getting five hits out of five times at bat.

Home runs hit by Purdy and Wilson were the big factors in the Rutledge defeat.

Next Sunday, Rutledge All-Stars play at Baring.

Hot, Dry Weather Spells Trouble For Soybean, Corn

Rootless corn syndrome is one of two unusual conditions Missouri farmers might see this growing season because of May’s hot, dry weather. Photo courtesy of Bill Wiebold.

by Linda Geist

Missouri’s record-breaking May heat and lack of precipitation set the stage for two unusual conditions in the state’s top cash crops—soybean and corn, says University of Missouri Extension agronomist Bill Wiebold.

He urges farmers to look for rootless corn syndrome and heat canker in soybean, conditions that result from drought and heat effects on seedlings and young plants.

Rootless corn syndrome

To understand this syndrome, Wiebold explains how corn root systems work:

Corn plants produce two root systems. The first system consists of roots that emerge from the seed and nourish the seedling. The second system contains adventitious (nodal) roots that form at stem nodes below and above the soil surface.

“This is the main root system of the corn plant,” Wiebold says.  “Plant health and yield is closely tied to the health and function of these roots.” Nodal roots are present as early as the 1-leaf stage and rapidly expand in number and length during vegetative growth. The earliest nodal roots form about 3/4 inch below the soil surface.

All roots require soil moisture to form and grow. Corn nodal roots form near the soil surface and depend highly on soil moisture there. In most years, spring precipitation keeps the soil wet enough for roots to grow, but early-season drought can dry soil to a point where roots cannot grow. This is compounded by high soil surface temperatures. Root growth is inhibited and even prevented by hot, dry soil.

A syndrome called rootless corn may occur. Affected seedlings grow normal primary roots—those roots that developed from the kernel—but they lack adventitious roots. “These plants may appear normal but begin to lodge when plants are about 15 inches tall because they are weakly anchored,” Wiebold says. Most Missouri corn is well past any concern. However, late-planted corn, including replanted fields, may be vulnerable to rootless corn syndrome if the soil surface is unusually dry.

Preventive actions are few. “If replanting corn, try not to till,” Wiebold says. “Tillage wastes precious water.” Previous crop residue that remains on the soil surface reduces water evaporation and slows the rise in soil temperature.

Soybean heat canker is one of two unusual conditions Missouri farmers might see this growing season because of May’s hot, dry weather. Photo courtesy of Bill Wiebold.

Heat canker in soybean

“Heat canker is an unusual occurrence in soybean related to soil surface temperature,” says Wiebold. Because evaporating water cools soil, the condition usually occurs when precipitation is sparse and the soil surface is extremely dry.

MU Extension’s network of weather stations recently reported soil temperatures above 95 degrees at the 2-inch level under bare soil. Soil surface temperatures are usually much higher than those at the 2-inch depth. Early in the growing season, plants are small and sunlight impinges on the soil surface. Soil absorbs the light and becomes hotter. With sparse leaf area, high air temperatures and bright sunshine, it is not uncommon for surface temperatures to exceed 120 degrees.

Emerging soybean seedlings up to V2 are vulnerable to heat canker. Young cells in the region where the hypocotyl touches the soil surface cannot tolerate high temperatures. The dead cells can occur as a ring around the stem or just on one side. The region appears “pinched” because water escaped and cells shrunk. The region will darken quickly. Affected plants often die. With heat canker, the root system remains white and looks normal. This can be used to distinguish heat canker from seedling diseases in which roots are discolored.

“This is a rare occurrence, but this is a year with rare combinations of sparse precipitation and hot temperatures,” says Wiebold. When heat canker is suspected, often only a few seedlings are affected. Very localized conditions can influence the severity.

“Hundreds of thousands of Missouri soybean acres have been planted during dry, hot weather,” says Wiebold. “Heat canker could be more widespread and affect a larger portion of seedlings than usual.”

There is little that can be done once heat canker is visible, says Wiebold. The damage has been done. No-till fields show an advantage, however. It is rare to see heat canker in no-till fields. Previous crop residue that remains on the soil surface reduces water evaporation and slows the rise in soil temperature.

Board of Aldermen Open Hiring Process for New City Manager Position

With retirement looming for several keys member of the municipal leadership team, the City of Memphis is preparing to embark on a new administrative course.

Applications are currently being accepted for a new city manager position to head the municipal team. The Memphis City Council unanimously approved the creation of the new team leader position last month and opened the application process last week.

Current City Superintendent Roy Monroe had announced initial plans to retire in July of 2019. The council indicated a desire to have the new city leader in place well before that point to have an opportunity to work with the current director to make the transition as smooth as possible.

The council’s goal is to transition the leadership position into more of a supervisory role, handling more of the administrative duties of running the roughly $5 million annual budget encompassing water, sewer and electrical utilities services not to mention an airport, park system, lake, and cemetery as well as police and fire protection.

Some of the duties the new city manager will be tasked with will include developing, recommending and implementing policies, program planning, fiscal management, administration and operations of all City functions and services for efficient and economic operation of the City.

The manager is responsible for accomplishing the City’s goals and objectives and for ensuring that the citizens are provided with desired and mandated services in an effective and cost efficient manner.

Key to those administrative goals will be the supervision of all departments and employees, including evaluations and training implementations.

The city manager will be responsible for creating an annual budget, salary plan and work blueprint that will result in weekly work schedules for all city departments targeting compliance and completion of existing goals.

In addition, the new administrative post will handle project planning, bids and contracts as well as serve in a public relations role.

The application process is open, and the council has not established any deadlines for making a hire.

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