April 23, 2009

Sparing Jakes Could Improve Turkey Hunting Now and Later

JEFFERSON CITYTurkey hunters in many parts of Missouri dont need an expert to tell them the states turkey population is down. However, they might be interested in suggestions that could improve their hunting experiences this year and in 2010.

Im hoping that hunters will adopt a two-year strategy, said Resource Scientist Tom Dailey. Focusing their energy on making quality hunts this year is the best thing they can do for themselves and for the states turkey flock.

Dailey, who oversees the Missouri Department of Conservations wild turkey management program, said he expects a significantly smaller turkey harvest this year than in 2008. Hunters checked 46,000 turkeys in last years spring turkey season. He expects the number to be closer to 40,000 this year.

The reasons are simple. First and foremost, Missouri has fewer gobblers this year than it has had in 20 years or so. Furthermore, the birds we do have are smarter. And, as is true of so many things related to turkey hunting, these differences are the result of weather.

Three of the last four years have seen below-average nesting success, said Dailey. In fact, the number of poults (recently hatched turkeys) seen in the 2008 survey was a modern record low. It wasnt much better in 2007 and only slightly better in 2005. 2006 is the only recent year when we had reasonably strong turkey reproduction.

Weather records explain turkey hens poor success in recent years. 2008 was the rainiest year on record. Persistent cold showers drowned nests and chilled poults before they could grow enough feathers to keep warm and dry. The results were disastrous, not only for turkeys but for quail and pheasants as well.

Late March and the first few days of April 2007 saw daytime highs in the 80s. Then, starting April 4 the peak of turkey egg-laying the mercury plunged into the teens and low 20s for six days running. Turkey eggs froze in nests. The weather was so extreme that turkey mating stopped entirely, with behavior reverting to late winter patterns.

Compared to those two years, 2005 was a great year for turkey reproduction, said Dailey, but in fact, it was a poor year, too. If it werent for 2006, we would really be looking at a dire situation.

Turkeys strong nesting performance three years ago set the stage for a paradoxical 2009 spring turkey season. A strong year-class of three-year-old turkeys means there will be a good supply of big gobblers for hunters to pursue. The bad news is that such gobblers are notoriously gun shy.

Three-year-olds are trophy birds, with big spurs and long beards, said Dailey, but its the two-year-old toms that gobble so lustily it makes hunters hair stand on end. A goofy 2-year-old will often run to a hunters call gobbling like crazy, but a 3-year-old is likely to sneak in silently, looking for the hen thats supposed to be making those seductive sounds. Or, he might just stand out in the middle of a field waiting for the hen to come to him. Theyre tough customers.

That, said Dailey, sets up a situation that could perpetuate diminished hunting opportunities.

I hope hunters dont hammer the jakes (1-year-old gobblers) on account of a lack of 2-year-olds. This years jake is next years two-year-old. Im hoping hunters will focus on quality hunts for older birds and less on just bagging a turkey. The number of jakes already is down in many areas.

Asked why the Conservation Commission didnt put jakes off-limits to hunters this year, Dailey notes that this would penalize hunters in areas where turkeys still are abundant. It also would put an unnecessary burden on hunters, who might have trouble distinguishing between mature and juvenile turkeys.

The recovery of our turkey flock will follow naturally when we get two or three years in a row of favorable nesting conditions, said Dailey. Hens are the key to rebuilding the population, so sparing a few jakes this year wont increase the number of birds we see in 2010. However, in areas where turkey numbers are down significantly, it could make for a better quality of hunt next year.

Northern Missouri has recorded the biggest decline in turkey numbers, but Dailey says that is relative. Northern counties went into the current slump with larger turkey populations than those south of the Missouri River. Consequently, many northern counties still will have good hunting.

That was really evident in the results of our gobbling study last year, says Dailey. Things were down quite a bit in the north, but there was still more gobbling in the north than in any other part of the state. While hunters in many areas are bracing for lower turkey numbers, many of the people I talk to see no problem whatsoever in their areas.

Dailey noted that Franklin County usually is in the top three turkey harvest counties statewide. He said this east-central Missouri continues to have very strong turkey numbers, and last years poult count was good, so he expects the area around Franklin County to have good hunting again this year.

With a good carry-over of three-year old birds and reduced numbers of 2-year-olds and jakes, Dailey recommends that hunters adjust their strategies. He said patience and restraint are this years watchwords patience for those who want to shoot mature gobblers, and restraint for those who want better hunting next year.

I think in general, people are going to have to move around more to find birds, said Dailey. Its a balancing act. You dont want to sit there all morning in a spot where there is no gobbling, but there might, indeed, be a bird there. Patience is important, but so is knowing when to move. If youre pretty sure there are turkeys in an area, stay put. Rely less on gobbling response and more on good calling.

He said pre-season scouting is the best way to solve this dilemma.

Because there is going to be less gobbling this year, it is going to be more difficult for someone to come into a new area and find birds. Hunters who put in the time to find those 3-year-old birds and learn their behavior patterns stand a much better chance of getting in a position where they get a shot.

This years spring turkey season opened April 20 and runs through May 10. Details of hunting regulations are available in the 2009 Spring Turkey Hunting Information booklet, which is available wherever hunting permits are sold, or at mdc.mo.gov/hunt/turkey/sprturk/.

SCR-I Dominates Newtown-Harris 77-4 in Tourney Opener

Ashleigh Creek scored 10 points in the win over Newtown-Harris.

Ashleigh Creek scored 10 points in the win over Newtown-Harris.

Scotland County went about its work on Monday night in the opener of the Novinger Tourney. The Lady Tigers who are looking for their ninth straight Novinger Tourney title, entered bracket play as the top seed, taking on #8 seed Newtown-Harris.

The Lady Tigers jumped out to a 33-0 lead in the first period and then spent much of the second half trying to avoid scoring too many points en route to a 77-4 victory.

Maddie Brassfield sank a three-pointer to open the contest for SCR-I. Despite never deploying its full-court press, SCR-I’s half court man-to-man defense still generated plenty of turnovers and the Lady Tigers poured in 10 straight points in transition capped by Chelsea Wood. The center picked off an errant pass and went coast-to-coast through traffic for the score.

Scotland County dominated the boards as well, cleaning up missed shots with offensive rebounds. Ashleigh Creek had six first quarter points coming from her work on the offensive glass.

With a home junior varsity game on Monday night as well, SCR-I dressed just seven players for the varsity tourney.  That still offered plenty of depth. Sadie Davis came off the bench to sink a pair of three-pointers in the second period.

SCR-I dialed back the fast break with the big lead. The half court offense proved plenty potent even without the transition game. Newtown-Harris had trouble defending the high-low pass in the post. Wood was the main benefactor, as she received several open looks on nice passes from fellow post player Creek, leading to some easy buckets.

Davis’s second three-pointer of the period just beat the buzzer and gave SCR-I a 53-2 lead at the half.

Scotland County further slowed down the offense in the third period, with Coach Cory Shultz demanding a minimum number of passes before SCR-I took a shot.

The results were much of the same. Bair drained a three pointer on the first possession. Creek and Wood continued their strong games in the paint, cleaning up missed shots with points on the offensive rebounds. But the third period was mostly about the Mad(d)ies. Maddie Brassfield scored in the paint on a nice pass from Bair before converting a three-point play on an offensive rebound. Madie Bondurant added a pair of field goals off the bench as SCR-I extended the lead to 70-2.

SCR-I went into a full-blown stall the final five minutes of the contest, refusing to take wide open shots while running through the offense as the clock ticked away on the 77-4 victory.

Wood finished with 20 points to lead Scotland County to the win. Bair had 19 points and Brassfield had 16 points while Creek finished with 10.

Chelsea Wood goes up for two of her game-high 20 points.

Chelsea Wood goes up for two of her game-high 20 points.

Keller, Coy Wedding

wedding-web

Matt and Lisa Coy of Kaysville, Utah and Dr. Ronald and Blanche Keller of Memphis, Missouri are pleased to announce the marriage of their children, Joshua McIntosh Keller and Kelsey Rae Coy. They were married September 3, 2016, at the Bountiful Utah Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. That evening they were honored at a reception at the Rock Chapel Courtyard in Kaysville, Utah. After graduating from Davis High School, the bride served 18 months on a Spanish speaking LDS mission in Mesa, Arizona. She is a senior at Brigham Young University where she is studying English and Business Management. Josh attended Scotland County High School before serving two years on an LDS mission in Villahermosa, Mexico. He is currently attending Brigham Young University, preparing for medical school. They reside in Provo, Utah.

2016 Omicron Theta Holiday Homes Tour Sunday

home-tours

The Boyer Retreat, owned by Shelly Boyer and Natalie Cook, located at 229 N. Clay in Memphis, will be one of the homes featured on the 2016 Omicron Theta Holiday Homes Tour.  This Victorian style home underwent restoration and beautiful changes by the previous owners, Keith and Michelle Klein.  The couple also remodeled the home’s kitchen.  With four bedrooms and two bathrooms, Shelly and Natalie are opening the house for lodging.  Their motto is “Let us be your home away from home.”  Home Tour guests are reminded that parking for the Boyer Retreat is limited.  The Omicron Theta Holiday Homes Tour will be held from 1:00-4:00 p.m. Sunday, December 4th.  Tickets will be available the day of the Tour only at Tumbleweeds on the square in Memphis starting at 12:45 p.m.  Ticket price is $10.00 and a portion of the proceeds will go to the Scotland County 4-H Extension Council.

Cooler Temperatures Expected This Winter: Expected Snowfall Between 15 and 20 Inches 

snowman-web

Temperatures have started to cool and coats and sweatshirts have been pulled out of the closets.

Tony Lupo, University of Missouri professor of atmospheric science, said those coats could get a lot of use this winter, as it could be a tad cooler than the average.

“I’m thinking it’s going to be a little colder than normal,” Lupo said. “This is due to the neutral-to-weak La Nina conditions that are in the Pacific. Generally, when that happens, we get that jet stream that is coming down from Alaska and cutting through the central United States then back up the east coast. It usually leads to cooler conditions in our part of the world.

“I look for that forecast to continue through the winter.”

The average winter temperature hovers around 32 degrees in Missouri. Lupo said that average temperatures should hang around 30 degrees this winter.

“Right now, we’re watching Alaska and Siberia,” Lupo said. “Siberia is pretty snow covered right now. We’re getting cold air masses built up there, which is very normal. There is a lot of cold air on the Russian side of the globe. We watch that to see if it has any tendency to nose into Alaska. When it does, and you get these La Nina situations, the jet stream can punch up into the northern regions and push that cold air into the United States.

“That’s what we’re watching right now. The Siberian cold seems to be deeper and larger than normal.”

Lupo added that precipitation should stay around normal, with 15 to 20 inches falling.

“Typically, in Missouri, you get four inches of snow and it goes away,” Lupo said. “Then you get two inches of snow and it goes away. This year, with cooler temperatures, that snow may stick around a little bit longer.”

If the winter temperatures do average 30 degrees, it will be very different than last year. Lupo said last year’s winter was one of the warmest in Missouri history. Average temperatures were 37 degrees, five degrees above normal.

“That’s a pretty healthy warm anomaly, to be that far above normal,” Lupo said.

Lupo said that Missouri has seen a variety of weather patterns this year. The spring was cooler than normal and the summer was warmer than normal. The summer is usually dry as well, but was wetter in 2016.

“The heat was just constant during the summer months,” Lupo said. “We didn’t get any cool spells and no 100-degree heat. It was very consistent.”

The warm weather continued into the fall.

“Right now, we’re on track to have the second warmest fall ever,” Lupo said. “It’s been unreal. After the warmest fall, in 1931, they had the warmest winter ever. I don’t think that’s going to happen in 2016, but there certainly is precedent for something like that to occur.

“If it doesn’t cool down and this warm fall continues, I’ll be eating crow and we’ll have a very warm winter.”

Regardless of where the temperatures end up, Lupo said it’s important to be prepared for whatever happens, especially if cold weather comes.

“You want to have some things on hand like candles and blankets, put some of that in your car just in case,” Lupo said. “Carry some kitty litter or sand in the back of your trunk. It helps with the weight and, if you are stuck, you can use some of it under your tires to give you traction.

“Just be prepared.”

Lady Tigers Ranked #7 in State to Start Season

The Scotland County Lady Tigers were ranked #7 in the 2016-17 Missouri Basketball Coaches Association preseason poll recently released.

Skyline, which returns the bulk of its lineup from last year’s third place team in state, earned the #1 ranking in girls Class 2.

Hartville slotted in at #2 followed by SCR-I’s new Class 2 District 6 foes, Clopton, ranked at #3.

Plato comes in at #4 with New Franklin, the team SCR-I lost to last season in the state quarterfinals, earning the #5 ranking.

Norwood is ranked just ahead of SCR-I at #6 with Van Buren, Purdy and Tipton rounding out the MBCA Class 2 Missouri Top 10.

Despite going 28-2 last year, Scotland County failed to earn a state ranking until the post season poll, that had the Lady Tigers ranked 9th.

District also features two top 10 teams on the boys side as well.

After knocking off SCR-I in the district championship and advancing to the Elite Eight a season ago, Knox County is ranked #7 in the boys pre-season poll. Clopton is ranked #9.

Hartville is the top ranked boys team in the state in Class 2, followed by Mansfield, Stanberry, Crane, Vienna and Thayer. Ellington is ranked #8 and Purdy comes in at #10.

SCR-I School Menus

Breakfast

Thursday, December 1 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Friday, December 2 – Sausage/Gravy Biscuits, Choice of Cereal, Apple Cinnamon Muffin, Banana, Juice/Milk

Monday, December 5 – Donuts, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Apple Wedges, Juice/Milk

Tuesday, December 6 –Pancakes, Choice of Cereal, Sausage Link, Toast/Jelly, Orange Slices, Juice/Milk

Wednesday, Dec. 7 – Bacon/Egg/Cheese Sandwich, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Half, Juice/Milk

Thursday, December 8 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Lunch

Thursday, December 1 – Chili Soup, Chicken Noodle Soup, Hamburger Bar, Turkey Salad Sandwich, Pickle Spear, Cheese Stick, Saltine Crackers, Cinnamon Apple Slices, Fresh Fruit

Friday, December 2 – Walking Taco, Fish Square/Bun, Diced Tomatoes, Cottage Cheese, Banana

Monday, December 5 – Chicken Nuggets, Fish Sticks, 5th/6th Grade Chef Salad, Macaroni and Cheese, Baked Beans, Chocolate Pudding, Sliced Pears, Fresh Fruit

Tuesday, December 6 – Bar BQ Hamburger, Bar BQ Hot Dogs, 5th/6th Grade Chef Salad, Tomato Slices and Pickles, Oven Ready Fries, Peas, Mandarin Orange Slices, Fresh Fruit

Wednesday, Dec. 7 –Salisbury Steak, Chicken Alfredo, 5th/6th Grade Potato Bar, Whipped Potatoes/Gravy, Broccoli/Cheese Sauce, Applesauce, Fresh Fruit

Thursday, December 8 – Spaghetti/Meat Sauce, Chicken Quesadillas, Hamburger Bar, Green Beans, Garlic Bread, Sliced Peaches, Fresh Fruit

Scotland County Senior Nutrition Center

MENU

Thursday, December 1 – Meatloaf, Scalloped Potatoes, Cauliflower Blend, Mandarin Oranges, Bread, Cake

Friday, December 2 – Catfish Nuggets, Macaroni and Cheese, 7 Layer Salad, Cornbread, Cherry Crisp

Monday, December 5 – Beef Stew, Lettuce Salad, Buttered Corn, Hot Roll, Baked Apples

Tuesday, December 6 – Country Fried Steak, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Coleslaw, Peas, Bread, Fruit Crisp

Wed., December 7 – Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Spinach, Hot Roll, Mixed Fruit

Thurs. December 8 – Creamed Chicken/Biscuit, Tomato and Zucchini Blend, Lettuce Salad, Bread, Fruit Salad

ACTIVITIES

Thursday, December 1 – Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Wednesday, Dec. 7 – Red Hats will join us for lunch today.

Thursday, Dec. 8 – Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

MDC Reports November Firearms Deer Harvest Tops 185,000

A fair share of the larger racks from the nearly 900 antlered bucks harvested in Scotland County rest beside the work desk of local taxidermist Scott Brassfield (pictured above), who said 2016’s firearms season produced an abundance of trophy deer for local hunters.

A fair share of the larger racks from the nearly 900 antlered bucks harvested in Scotland County rest beside the work desk of local taxidermist Scott Brassfield (pictured above), who said 2016’s firearms season produced an abundance of trophy deer for local hunters.

Preliminary data from the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) shows that deer hunters in Missouri harvested 185,066 deer during the November portion of fall firearms deer season, Nov. 12-22. Of the 185,066 deer harvested, 95,383 were antlered bucks, 18,889 were button bucks, and 70,794 were does. Top harvest counties were Howell with 3,910 deer checked, Franklin with 3,738, and Texas with 3,562.

Scotland County hunters checked in 897 antlered bucks, 173 button bucks and 632 does for a total of 1,702 deer. Schuyler County bagged 1,156 deer while Knox County topped out at 1,649 deer and Clark County checked in 1,539 deer.

Last year, Missouri hunters checked 186,542 deer during the 2015 November portion of firearms deer season with 90,094 being antlered bucks, 20,911 being button bucks, and 75,537 being does.

MDC reported three firearms-related hunting incidents during the fall firearms November portion. Two of the three incidents involved self-inflicted firearm wounds and occurred in Barry and Camden counties. The third involved one hunter in a party in Grundy County wounding another while shooting at a deer.

Deer hunting in Missouri continues with archery deer hunting from Nov. 23 through Jan. 15, firearms late youth portion Nov. 25-27, firearms antlerless portion Dec. 2-4, and firearms alternative methods portion Dec. 24 through Jan. 3.

2,944 Deer Checked in During Late Youth Season

The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) reported that young deer hunters ages 6 through 15 checked 2,944 deer during Missouri’s late youth portion of this year’s deer hunting season, Nov. 25-27. Of the 2,944 deer harvested, 1,149 were antlered bucks, 426 were button bucks, and 1,369 were does. Top harvest counties were Pike with 70 deer checked, Howell with 55, and Lincoln and Osage with 52 each.

Scotland County youth hunters checked in 26 deer, including 11 antlered bucks. The total was 16 deer in Schuyler County, with Knox County youth harvesting 28 deer and Clark County kids getting 23 deer.

Last year’s late youth portion harvest total was 2,353 with 664 being antlered bucks, 376 button bucks, and 1,313 does.

National Adoption Month Reminds Missourians That More Than 1,500 Children Are in Need of  Family

foster-adoption

November is National Adoption Month and approximately 1,500 children and youth in Missouri are waiting for a forever home with a loving family.  Every day, the Department of Social Services, Children’s Division and the Missouri Heart Gallery work to raise awareness of the youth and children in foster care who deserve a family they can call their own.

The wait for a forever family is especially hard for teens, approaching adulthood without a nurturing, loving and caring forever family by their side.   A forever family provides the encouragement, guidance, security, and reassurance they need at this crucial time in their life.  Older youth long to have a forever family they can make proud and share memories and celebrate joyful moments. They are anxious to begin their lives with a forever family exploring the world around them, pursuing their dreams, and building a brighter future with a loving family by their side.

Shelley Curry, First Circuit Manager for the Children’s Division reminded the public that anyone can apply to become an adoptive parent in Missouri, as long as they are 21 years old and willing to go through the training and assessment process. You can be with or without children; be single or married, own or rent a home, apartment, condo or other residence that meets licensing standards.

The adoption process includes background checks, health screenings, financial discussions and home assessments.

Basic requirements include:

At least 21 years of age

Complete a child abuse/neglect check and criminal record check (including fingerprints)

Be in good mental and physical health

Have a stable income

Be willing to participate in and complete a free training and assessment process

The Children’s Division is always looking for nurturing individuals who would be interested in becoming adoptive parents and opening their home to one of these incredible older youth or another child in need. If you would like to find out more about these wonderful youth or if adoption or foster parenting is right for you, please visit our Web site at http://www.MOHeartGallery.Org  or call 1-800-554-2222 for more information, or email us at MOheartgallery@adoptex.org.  You may also contact your local Children’s Division office at 660-465-8549 or 660-727-3393. You can make a difference in the life of a child through foster parenting and/or adoption.

On November 29th, U.S. Senators Roy Blunt (MO) and Amy Klobuchar (MN), co-chairs of the Congressional Coalition on Adoption, welcomed Senate passage of their resolution recognizing November as National Adoption Month and November 19th as National Adoption Day.

“Every child deserves a stable, loving home and the foundation for a successful future that it provides,” Blunt said. “As a proud adoptive parent myself, I hope more Americans will use this opportunity to consider expanding their families through the gift of adoption. It has been an honor to work with the adoption community to help connect children who need permanent homes with the devoted parents ready to welcome them into their lives, and I look forward to continuing that effort.”

As co-chairs of the bipartisan CCA, Blunt and Klobuchar work to engage Members of Congress on issues pertaining to children in need of permanent homes, children in the foster care system, and domestic and international child welfare.

Klobuchar added, “Over the years, some of my most memorable work as Senate co-chair of the Congressional Coalition on Adoption has been helping families navigate the often difficult and complicated adoption process. By recognizing November as National Adoption Month and November 19th as National Adoption Day, we help increase awareness about children in need of loving homes and honor the hard work of these nurturing adoptive families.”

Last week, Blunt and Klobuchar joined Representatives Trent Franks (Ariz.) and Brenda Lawrence (Mich.), House co-chairs of the CCA, in sending a letter to the U.S. Department of State expressing concern over new international adoption regulations and the negative impact some of the Department’s proposed changes could have on the adoption process. Blunt and Klobuchar have also worked to resolve pending adoption cases from several countries, including the Democratic Republic of Congo and Nepal.

In July, Blunt and Klobuchar introduced the Vulnerable Children and Families Act, which would help more children living without families or in institutional care find permanent homes by enhancing U.S. diplomatic efforts around international child welfare and ensuring that intercountry adoption to the United States becomes a more viable and fully-developed option.

Last year, Blunt and Klobuchar introduced the Supporting Adoptive Families Act to provide resources for pre- and post-adoption support services, including training, counseling, and mental health treatment.

Blunt and Klobuchar have also co-sponsored the Adoption Tax Credit Refundability Act and the Adoptive Family Relief Act, which was signed into law last year.

Memphis to Host 35th Annual Christmas Bazaar on December 3rd

bazaar-web

The 35th Annual Christmas Bazaar sponsored by Epsilon Iota Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi of Memphis, MO will be held Saturday, December 3rd, 2016, at the Scotland County High School from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.  There is no charge for admission.

A food stand will be open all day.  Doughnuts and coffee will be available in the morning.  Lunch will consist of hot dogs, chili dogs, ham sandwiches, chili, chips, pie, cake, tea, milk, coffee, soft drinks, hot chocolate and bottled water.

Santa pictures will be taken from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.  Child care will be provided again this year for bazaar shoppers.  There is a charge for these two services.

Vendors may set up Friday evening December 2nd between 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m.

Along with our faithful exhibitors over the past 34 bazaars, we have a lot of new crafters with different items to be sold this year.  Come out and do your Christmas shopping and enjoy a meal with family and friends.

Exhibitors will be coming from Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri.

Epsilon Iota Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi has given over $3,300.00 back to the Memphis Community including Scotland County Senior Scholarships for continuing education, donations to school organizations, FBLA, SCR-1 Band, SCAMP, Boys Senior Breakfast, Dictionaries to the Spelling Bee winners and Scotland County After Prom Parents as well as helping with community emergency need assistance, May Day flower delivery, SC Care Center, Methodist Church Christmas Wish program, Head Start Adopt a Child and St. John’s Church Thanksgiving Dinner, just to name a few.

Doors open at 6:30 a.m. on Saturday for additional vendors to set up.  Students will be available to help exhibitors load and unload.  Exhibitors are asked not to leave before 3:30 p.m.

Anyone interested in exhibiting at the Christmas Bazaar, please call: (660) 465-2496 or (660) 465-2668.

« Older Entries