April 9, 2009

Producers Meet With Commission to Discuss Animal Health Ordinance

Area livestock producers met with the Scotland County Commission at a special meeting held April 1st at Lakeview Community Center in Rutledge. Between 100 and 150 people were present for the gathering.

During the March 26th regular meeting of the commission, the county had indicated plans to hold a pair of public hearings regarding the a proposed animal health ordinance it had been working on with the Scotland County Concerned Citizens group.

During the session, a number of livestock producers spoke with the commissioners regarding questions about the health ordinance. It was announced that the producers would be holding a meeting April 1st, and the commission agreed to postpone the public hearing on the proposed ordinance until after meeting with the producers to discuss their concerns.

The following are the minutes of the meeting as presented by the Scotland County Clerks office.

Clyde Zimmerman opened the meeting by welcoming everyone and stating that this was an informational meeting to learn more about ordinances and how they work. Mr. Zimmerman introduced the Scotland County Commission and asked them to individually speak about some of the problems and concerns they have had to address concerning Scotland Countys health ordinance in particular.

Commissioner Paul Campbell addressed the audience. He stated that Scotland County did have an ordinance but because of enforcement issues the Commissioners scrapped it. Commissioner Campbell admitted that they have been working with a group of individuals to see if another ordinance could possibly be adopted; however, Commissioner Campbell reiterated that this was just talk. Nothing has formally been done. Commissioner Campbell stated that some points have come to the Commission that do not reflect well on the CAFOs in the County. Commissioner Campbell addressed the issue of applicators running up and down the road from the lagoon to the land where the manure is going to be applied. In this case manure is spilled on the roads and the neighbors do not like it. Additionally these full applicators are tearing up the county roads. Commissioner Campbell asked the producers to try to use good judgment when hauling and spreading manure. Be as clean as possible when hauling manure and, while the process is weather permitting, try to work the manure in as quickly as possible when spreading to help the smell and nutrient levels. Problems from dairies are getting blamed on CAFOs. Commissioner Campbell asked the producers to be aware of their neighbors. Please watch for drainage on your neighbors property if you cannot work the manure in quickly. He restated that these are merely points the Commission was asked to address. The Commission is not trying to govern the dairies. He then asked Presiding Commissioner Mike Stephenson and Commissioner Denis (Deny) Clatt if they had anything else to address.

Presiding Commissioner Stephenson and Commissioner Clatt replied that Commissioner Campbell had addressed all their concerns.

Mr. Edwin Brubaker addressed the audience about local dairy farms. He stated that there are currently 39 dairy farms in Scotland County, and those dairy farms employee approximately 50 families. He commented that these 39 dairies combined have around 3,000 cows, and last year those farms generated nearly $10 million in revenue. According to his statistics, each dollar generated by these dairies turns over seven times within the County equaling a $70 million impact on the County. The 39 local dairies paid approximately $100,000.00 in county taxes. Mr. Brubaker then spoke about some concerns he had with the proposed health ordinance. He stated that if a producer expands his business he will fall under the proposed ordinance because of the way it is written. He was also concerned about the citizens advisory board being composed of non-CAFO people. Mr. Brubaker felt that non-producers would not be qualified to be on the advisory board, and suggested that it would be difficult to determine who, besides employees of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR), would be qualified to be on that board. Mr. Brubaker said that all Grade A dairies must have an approved sewage system for their homes; whereas most country homes merely drain sewage into the grader ditch. He asked how water quality was affected differently between manure from a confinement and manure from a home. Mr. Brubaker addressed the problem of manure being spilled on the roads. He believes that all producers have the responsibility to be a good neighbor. While mistakes happen, there should be a plan of action in place to clean the spill. He suggested that the careless producers should have to clean the mess and fix the road. Mr. Brubaker also commented that grain trucks also tear up the rock roads, but they do not stink.

Dave Drenum with Missouri Dairy Association stated that there are only 18 counties in Missouri with a health ordinance. The Dairy Association is opposed to these ordinances because more restrictions results in increased costs to the producers. Missouri is a milk-deficit state (i.e. we haul more milk into Missouri than we produce), so he believes that the state needs more dairies. Increasing cost of production is not going to increase dairies. Mr. Drenum clarified that 210 cows equals 300 Animal Units (AU) (0.7 of a cow equals 1 AU). Producers must remember that all animals, hogs, dairy cows, dry cows, etc., are considered when figuring total AUs. The average dairy is 65 cows, however most dairies around here are smaller. Mr. Drenum believes that the proposed ordinance does not offer practical solutions for producers. The proposed ordinance mandates disposal of dead animals within 24 hours. This is not feasible because new laws require dead animals to have the brain and spinal cord removed. Not many rendering companies can do this without passing the cost on to the producer. Mr. Drenum also said that knifing in the manure would not be feasible. He expressed the need to adopt a Best Management Practices policy, not an ordinance. Dairies do not need an ordinance because they are highly inspected since they are dealing with a perishable product. Mr. Drenum introduced Kevin Frankenbock from Marion County, and stated that Barry Stevens at the University would be willing to help anyone with questions about this ordinance.

Jerry Foster, Cargill Environmental Manager (and past DNR employee) stated that 0.7 of a cow is 1 AU, and an animal counts once it is weaned. Mr. Foster informed the audience that DNR has composed an odor commission, but it only regulates Class IA Operations (Sharps is the only one in the state). This commission is backed by the Missouri Clean Air Commission. Mr. Foster said that DNR is also looking at new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) laws and what effect they would have on Missouri Law affecting CAFOs.

Gigi Wahba asked Mr. Brubaker if dairies would be affected by this ordinance because they did not confine their cows for a 45-day period. Mr. Brubaker said that they take their cows to the barns every day, and that counts as confinement, thus the ordinance affects the dairies.

Mr. Drenum recognized Larry Frederick from Baring, who is also with the Missouri Dairy Association. He then asked Mr. Foster to answer questions from the audience.

Mr. Foster began by clarifying that he is no longer a DNR employee; he is a Cargill employee. If anyone has any questions for DNR he advised them to contact Joe England at DNR in Jefferson City (800) 361-4827 or Joe Bowdish at the Macon office.

Presiding Commissioner Stephenson asked Mr. Foster if he felt that state regulations were coming closer to regulating these CAFOs.

Mr. Foster replied that he felt state regulations were becoming more strict because they are developing a new nutrient management technical standard.

Mr. Jay Sensenig asked Mr. Foster about the proposed ordinance requiring the producer to inject manure 8 inches deep.

Mr. Foster stated that injecting manure 8 inches is a pretty severe requirement. He also replied that injecting the manure too deep causes more problems. For example, manure injected past the level where breakdown occurs would cause the manure to stay in the ground. Mr. Foster referred the question to Bryan Ripland, agronomist with Pennacal.

Mr. Ripland replied that he would be worried about injecting manure 8 inches because the root systems cannot get down that far in a wet year. Mr. Ripland went on to say that this proposed ordinance has some scary things in it. He asked who would regulate the ordinance. Who would be conducting the soil testing, and paying for that testing with the price of things going up? He suggested spending that money on educating producers as to what the County expected of them. Perhaps, he suggested, the County would be better off being proactive than reactive.

Commissioner Clatt asked Mr. Ripland how deep he would knife in the manure. Mr. Ripland replied that he thought 6 inches was ideal that way the manure is just covered and gets to where the roots are located.

Mr. Foster asked if injecting was always appropriate as some land is not suitable for injecting.

Mr. Brubaker commented that it is nearly impossible to inject dairy manure.

Mr. Ripland agreed with Mr. Brubaker as diary manure has more solids than hog manure. A larger injector would be required and add cost to the producer.

Commissioner Clatt asked Mr. Brubaker if he could disc in the manure immediately after spreading. Brubaker replied that the manure had to have time to dry before discing it in or he would get stuck.

Mr. Ripland said it would take a lot of time and money to do the testing this proposed ordinance requires and it would be difficult to prove the testing was actually being done. He also said the producers would have to be educated on how to do the testing.

Ms. Wahba stated that she is part of the group advocating the ordinance. She said that hog manure is different from dairy manure because of the antibiotics and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) being fed to the hogs. She suggested that the dairymen were being told this ordinance would apply to them in the future and she does not think they should believe it.

Mr. Ripland asked Ms. Wahba to whom this ordinance would apply. Ms. Wahba replied that this ordinance would apply to animals that are indoors all the time. There are 8 to 10 facilities in the County now, but the factory system has problems.

Mr. Ripland asked Ms. Wahba if those animals in confinements are treated differently from animals on pasture.

Ms. Wahba responded that animals in confinements are treated differently because they are fed large amounts of antibiotics and GMOs.

A gentleman stated that he had sows outside for years and recently moved them inside. Now he has large amounts of manure to haul out of his pit. He would like to know where all that manure went when the sows were outside.

Mr. Foster addressed the Commission by asking them to consider three questions. First, where do regulations stop? He questioned if the Commission was going to stop farmers from planting round-up ready soybeans (also a GMO)? He asked the Commission to consider land values. In his experience, land values are lower where ordinances are in place. Last he asked the Commission to consider what was driving this ordinance-health, social, or economic concerns.

An individual asked how manure compared to anhydrous.

Mr. Foster replied that manure is more natural than anhydrous; however, all things should be used in moderation. Anhydrous has more phosphorus than manure, which burns up earthworms and other microbes. As long as manure is not injected too deep it works with microbes to add organic matter (which soil in this area is lacking) to the soil. Anhydrous breaks down organic matter.

Kevin Frankenbock from Marion County said that Marion County threw out their ordinance. The Commission had a group of people come to them requesting to reinstate the ordinance. The Commission said they had no intent to do so, so the group went to the County Health Board and got the ordinance reinstated. He said that anytime the county did a referendum the producers won hands down.

Presiding Commissioner Stephenson apologized to all the producers in attendance for ever supporting the ordinance, and stated that he would continue to oppose reinstating the ordinance. He was received with ovations from the crowd.

Tim Steinkamp with Cargill spoke about confining animals and feeding them GMOs. He stated that this ordinance is a vehicle to stop commercial livestock production in Scotland County.

Dee Ruth asked the Commission how they would handle this proposed ordinance as they did not enforce the previous ordinance. She feels that producers need only be regulated by DNR.

A gentleman asked how much revenue a CAFO generates.

Mr. Frakenbock estimated that a 5,000 head unit would generate approximately $7,000 in tax revenue.

The Commission asked if they had this ordinance and it drove the numbers down what would they do to make up the revenue for schools.

The Commission replied that they did not heavily rely on this income, but if they did the only option they would have would be to raise the tax levy for the school.

Garth Lloyd said that he detected fear in the room. He said that the last ordinance did not affect the dairies and this one would not either.

Many dairy producers stated that this ordinance would affect them.

Mr. Clyde Zimmerman closed the meeting.

Buford Shuts Down Knox County In Conference Tourney Semifinals

Knox County had the bases loaded with just one out in the top of the second inning Saturday afternoon in Moberly in a 0-0 game in the Lewis & Clark Conference Tournament semifinals. But starter Aaron Buford buckled down and struck out Logan Miller and Jacobi Miller to end the scoring threat, and basically end the Eagles chances.

Buford was perfect over the final five innings, retiring the final 17 batters in order.

The Tigers finally got their bats going in the third inning of Knox County starter Isaiah Prebe. Will Pickerell led off with a base hit. Buford walked. Pickerell was caught trying to steal third, but the Tigers kept the pressure on. Gage Dodge plated Buford with a base hit. Will Fromm added a hit before a Knox County error allowed two more runs to score to put SCR-I up 3-0.

Elijah Cooley started the fourth inning with a bunt single. After a hit by Aaron Blessing, Cooley scored on a fielder’s choice by Pickerell. Buford doubled in a run and Dodge added an RBI hit to push the lead to 6-0.

The Tigers tacked on two more tallies in the bottom of the sixth. Blessing tripled and scored on a hit by Buford. Pinch runner Parker Triplett came in to score on a sacrifice fly by Fromm to make the final score 8-0.

Buford notched the shutout, holding the Eagles to just two hits and one walk while striking out 11 over seven innings of work.

He also went 2-3 at the plate with two RBIs and a run scored. Dodge was 2-3 with two RBI and Blessing went 2-3 with a run scored while Lane Pence went 2-4 as the Tigers out hit Knox County 11-2 on the day.

Scotland County improved to 12-0 with the win.

USDA Officials Visit Memphis to Announce $4.6 Million Loan for Wastewater System Upgrades

City of Memphis officials were joined by representatives of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Rural Development Division, and representatives from the offices of Rep. Sam Graves and Sen. Claire McCaskill to announce funding for a municipal wastewater project.

USDA Rural Development Acting Area Director Leann Gleason today announced a Water & Waste Disposal Loan of $4,641,500 to the City of Memphis. The funds are being used to upgrade the existing wastewater treatment system from a discharge to a no-discharge, land application system in order to comply with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, along with collection system improvements.

“Having a sanitary and up-to-date sewer system is very important to the livelihood of any community. Without wastewater treatment facilities, residences and businesses would not exist,” said Gleason. “The City of Memphis is taking proactive steps to make improvements to their wastewater treatment system for long term use. We are proud to be in partnership with the city to assure they have a system in place to preserve and improve the quality of life for the community.”

Memphis has operated a centralized sewer system for several decades. The city currently owns and operates a sewer collection and treatment system consisting of one facultative lagoon system and a combination of gravity sewer, lines and collective force mains. After the upgrades, the City of Memphis’ wastewater treatment facility will comply with the current MO DNR requirements.

The Water & Waste Disposal Loan and Grant Program provides funding for clean and reliable drinking water systems, sanitary sewage, disposal, sanitary solid waste’ disposal, and storm water drainage to households and businesses in eligible rural areas. Further information on additional programs is available by visiting the USDA Missouri Rural Development website at http://www.rd.usda.gov/mo. Interested parties may also. contact the Kirksville Area Office at (660) 665-3274 Ext 4.

USDA, through its Rural Development mission’ area, has an active portfolio of more than $216 billion in loans and loan guarantees. These programs are designed to improve the economic stability of rural communities, businesses, residents, farmers and ranchers and improve the quality of life, in rural America.

NANCY JUNE BARNES (9/13/1942 – 4/24/2017)

Nancy June Barnes, age 74, of Edina, MO, passed away Monday, April 24, 2017, in Edina, MO.  She was born September 13, 1942 in Peoria, IL the daughter of Perry Riley and Zerita Faye Wright Meeks.

She was united in marriage to Gerald James Barnes on April 10, 1960, in Edina, MO, and he preceded her in death on September 3, 2011.  Nancy was also preceded in death by her parents, one brother Hollis Meeks, two sisters Jewel Skelton and Virginia Meeks.

Surviving are three children, Brenda Strange of Edina, MO, Jimmy (Sharon) Barnes of Novinger, MO, and Richard (Teresa) Barnes of LaPlata, MO, one brother Perry (Ruth) Meeks of Wheaton, IL, eight grandchildren, Juston and friend Mindy, John and wife Kim, Eric and friend Traci, Todd and friend Sabrina, Mark and friend Sara, Shyanne and husband Jerome, Kylea and husband Cody and Lexi, eight great grandchildren, Ava, Paisley, Addison, Brylee, Ariel, Eliza, Scotty and Krystina, several brothers and sisters-in-law, Darrell, Harold and Linda Barnes, Stanley Purdin, Donna Patterson, Sandra Hoskins, Kay Cassidy, Larry, Ronnie and Jana Barnes, Donna and Perry Meeks.  Several nieces, nephews and cousins.

Nancy received her education in Scotland County.  She was employed for 19 years with Edina Elementary and Knox County High School as a Cook.  She was also employed with Knox County Home Health, Midge’s Greenhouse and Knox County Nursing Home.  Nancy enjoyed being with her family and friends, gardening, quilting and reading books.  She was a past 50 year member of Colony Eastern Star, and an active member of the Edina First Christian Church.

Funeral services will be held 10 a.m. Saturday, April 29, 2017, in the Hudson-Rimer Funeral Home, in Edina, MO.  Reverend Dewayne Wellborn will officiate the services assisted by Steve Miller.  Burial will be in the Linville Cemetery.

Music will be Rita Worthington and Wynona Banks.  Selections will include In The Garden.

Casket bearers will be John Strange, Todd Strange, Mark Strange, Phillip Spory, Dave Fagan and Joe Campbell.

Honorary bearers will be brothers and sisters-in-law and Perry Meeks, Lexi Barnes, Eric Strange and Juston Barnes.

Visitation will be held Friday, April 28, 2017, after 4 p.m. with family receiving friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Hudson-Rimer funeral Home in Edina, MO.

Memorials may be made to Edina First Christian Church or Hospice Compasses.   Memorials may be left at or mailed to Hudson-Rimer Funeral Home, P.O. Box 1, Edina, MO 63537.

Classified Ads

GARDEN TILLERS FOR SALE – Rear and front tine tillers.  All makes and sizes.  Lots of Troy Bilts. Kahoka, MO 660-216-1809.

FARMER’S MARKET – Each Thursday starting May 4, 2017 at Memphis Medical Building (SC Hospital). 2:00-6:00 p.m.  Vendors welcome to join us.

JUST ARRIVED – Garden Seed, Seed Potatoes and Onion Sets are in at  Countryside Flowers. 465-8521.

HOUSE FOR RENT – Three bedroom house in Memphis.  No Smoking. Call 660-341-4819.

FOR SALE – Fresh homegrown asparagus.  Call 660- 945-3020.

FOR SALE – Green Mountain Pellet Grill, Daniel Boone Model.  Works perfect. Paid over $600, will take $500, OBO.  Still 1½ year guarantee remaining.  Includes grill cover and a bag of pellets.  Contact Richard Harper at 660-328-6216 or 660-341-4327.

FOR SALE – 4 plots in the New Catholic Cemetery, Edina, Section NE West half F11.  Good location in upright stone section. 660-627-1688.

MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE – Friday, April 28 (8-4) and Saturday, April 29 (8-12).  Tons of shirts and dresses, shoes and coats, boys’ and girls’ clothes up to 2T, new infant caps, changing table, high chair, car seats, sweeper, Cabella’s Camp Chairs, rocking chair/ottoman, grill (propane), meat grinder, baked goods and much more.  One mile west of Memphis, Good Residence.  Beside Ed’s Machinery.

SCR-I School Menus

Breakfast

Thursday, April 27 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Friday, April 28 – Sausage/Gravy, Biscuits, Choice of Cereal, Chocolate Chip Muffin, Banana, Juice/Milk

Monday, May 1 – Mini Breakfast Bites, Choice of Cereal, Cinnamon Biscuit, Orange Slices, Juice/Milk

Tuesday, May 2 – Cinnamon Rolls, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Rings, Juice/Milk

Wednesday, May 3 – Bacon/Egg/Cheese Sandwich, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Fruit Medley, Juice/Milk

Thursday, May 4 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Lunch

Thursday, April 27 – Goulash, Chicken Stir Fry, Hamburger Bar, Green Beans, Dinner Roll, Fruit Cocktail, Fresh Fruit

Friday, April 28 – Walking Taco, Fish Sticks, Diced Tomatoes, Cottage Cheese, Sliced Peaches, Fresh Fruit

Monday, May 1 – Mini Corn Dogs, Chicken Nuggets, 5th/6th Grade Chef Salad, Macaroni and Cheese, Mixed Vegetables, Chocolate Pudding, Mandarin Orange Slices, Fresh Fruit

Tuesday, May 2 – Cheeseburger/Bun, Chicken Patty/Bun, 5th/6th Grade Taco Bar, Oven Ready Fries, Tomato Slices and Pickles, Applesauce, Fresh Fruit

Wednesday, May 3 – Pork Choppette, Chicken and Noodles, 5th/6th Grade Potato Bar, Whipped Potatoes/Gravy, Buttered Corn, Dinner Roll, Sliced Pears, Fresh Fruit

Thursday, May 4 – Spaghetti/Meat Sauce, Chicken Wrap, Hamburger Bar, Green Beans, Garlic Bread, Applesauce, Fresh Fruit

Scotland County Senior Nutrition Center

MENU

Thursday, April 27 – Roast Pork, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Bread, Sauerkraut, Cranberry Sauce, Pudding

Friday, April 28 – Fish Fillets, Sweet Potatoes, Broccoli Salad, Peas, Cornbread, Cream Pie

Monday, May 1 – Juicy Burger/Bun, French Fries, Cauliflower Blend Veggies, Peaches, Cookie

Tuesday, May 2 – Meatloaf, Baked Potato, Marinated Tomatoes, Lima Beans, Slice Bread, Pudding

Wednesday, May 3 – Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Buttered Corn, Hot Roll, Fruit Salad

Thursday, May 4 – Ham and Beans, Carrot-Pineapple Salad, Buttered Beats, Cornbread, Cake

ACTIVITIES

Thursday, April 27 –Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Wednesday, May 3 – Red Hats will join us for lunch today.

Thursday, May 4 –Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

SC Ministerial Alliance Plans for National Day of Prayer Thursday, May 4

Dion Elmore, Chief Communications Officer of the National Day of Prayer Task Force, states, “The National Day of Prayer is not just a vital part of America’s heritage, but is as relevant and critical today as it was at the first call by our Continental Congress in 1775.”  Established in public law by a joint resolution of Congress signed by President Truman in 1952, then amended to designate the day under the 100th Congress and President Reagan in 1988, it states that “The President shall issue each year a proclamation designating the first Thursday in May as a National Day of Prayer on which the people of the United States may turn to God in prayer and meditation at churches, in groups and as individuals.”

Elmore goes on to say, “As our nation struggles with foreign and domestic threats, economic insecurity, cultural tensions, and continual challenges to basic constitutional rights, citizens of the United States are preparing to heed the call by our elected leaders to exercise one of their most precious freedoms – the right to gather, turn to God, and pray.  In response, millions will assemble at thousands of local events across the nation, where they will take time out of their daily schedules to intercede on behalf of their communities, their nation, and their leaders.”

The theme for the 2017 National Day of Prayer observation is For Your Great Name’s Sake! Hear Us…Forgive Us…Heal Us! Based upon Daniel 9:19, it emphasizes our need as a nation to cry out to God who is sovereign over all governments and authorities; “O Lord, Listen! O Lord, Forgive! O Lord, Hear and Act!”

The Scotland County Ministerial Alliance invites everyone to the First Christian Church in Memphis on Thursday, May 4th at noon to join them in praying for our nation.

Preparation is Key to Successful Blood Donation

Healthy individuals are needed every day to maintain an adequate blood supply for patients in need.  Once a donor has made the commitment to give blood, it is important to take a few simple steps to prepare and help ensure a good donation experience.

The Red Cross recommends getting a good night’s sleep, eating a good breakfast or lunch, and drinking water and fluids to help replace the volume you will donate.  Additionally, they suggest avoiding caffeinated beverages and eating iron-rich foods to boost your iron level.

Donating blood is an easy way to help others and only takes about an hour of your time.  The Red Cross encourages donors to give blood every time they are eligible: every 56 days for whole blood donations and every 112 days for double red cell donations.

Make an appointment and encourage your family and friends to donate on Tuesday, May 9, 2017 from 1:30-6:00 p.m. at the First Baptist Church, 910 N. Weaver in Memphis.

Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information.  All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients.  A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in.  Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental permission in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood.  High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

The American Red Cross provides shelter, food and clothing to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches lifesaving skills; ministers international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families.  The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission.  For more information, please visit redcross.org or join their blog at blog.redcross.org.

Sheriff’s Office to Offer Drug Take Back Day

The Scotland County Sheriff’s Office is participating in National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on April 29, 2017.

Expired or no longer needed prescription drugs can be dropped off at the Sheriff’s Office on the north end of the lower floor of the Courthouse in Memphis from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

While the Sheriff’s Office will take medications all year long, this day and time focuses awareness about disposing of medications in a environmentally safe way.

Having a dedicated disposal date also assists with eliminating the potential for abuse or accidental ingestion by an adult or child who has not been prescribed the medication.

All medications are eligible to be taken back with the exception of inhalers or aerosol-propelled medications, or any kinds of needles or “sharp?. api-pens (epinephrine injectors) can be accepted only if they are in a box.

Spring clean the medicine cabinet knowing you have place to go with what you no longer want or need!

Local Students Receive State FFA Degrees

SCR-I seniors Sadie Davis, Lane Mohr, Calesse Bair, and McKaela Bradley each received their State FFA Degree at the 89th Annual Missouri FFA Convention held in Columbia April 21-22, 2017.

Four members of the Memphis FFA Chapter, Calesse Bair, McKaela Bradley, Sadie Davis, and Lane Mohr, received their State FFA Degree, the highest degree members can receive at the state level.

The Memphis FFA members were 4 of 761 degree recipients who received the honor during the State FFA Degree Ceremony at the 89th Missouri FFA Convention. The annual convention was held April 20-21 at the Hearnes Center in Columbia, Missouri.

Awarding of the degree is based on a member’s supervised agricultural experience program in agribusiness or production agriculture and leadership ability as demonstrated through involvement in FFA, school, and community activities. The State FFA Degree award charms are sponsored by MFA Inc., Columbia.

“The State FFA Degree is the highest recognition a state can award, representing three percent of the total Missouri FFA membership per year,” said State FFA Advisor Leon Busdieker.

Embrace Change, Respect Tradition was the theme for this year’s Missouri FFA Convention More than 8,500 youth and guests were in attendance.

The Missouri FFA has 26,057 members representing 342 chapters. The national organization has more than 649,000 members representing 7,589 chapters in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The FFA makes a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education.

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