April 9, 2009

Producers Meet With Commission to Discuss Animal Health Ordinance

Area livestock producers met with the Scotland County Commission at a special meeting held April 1st at Lakeview Community Center in Rutledge. Between 100 and 150 people were present for the gathering.

During the March 26th regular meeting of the commission, the county had indicated plans to hold a pair of public hearings regarding the a proposed animal health ordinance it had been working on with the Scotland County Concerned Citizens group.

During the session, a number of livestock producers spoke with the commissioners regarding questions about the health ordinance. It was announced that the producers would be holding a meeting April 1st, and the commission agreed to postpone the public hearing on the proposed ordinance until after meeting with the producers to discuss their concerns.

The following are the minutes of the meeting as presented by the Scotland County Clerks office.

Clyde Zimmerman opened the meeting by welcoming everyone and stating that this was an informational meeting to learn more about ordinances and how they work. Mr. Zimmerman introduced the Scotland County Commission and asked them to individually speak about some of the problems and concerns they have had to address concerning Scotland Countys health ordinance in particular.

Commissioner Paul Campbell addressed the audience. He stated that Scotland County did have an ordinance but because of enforcement issues the Commissioners scrapped it. Commissioner Campbell admitted that they have been working with a group of individuals to see if another ordinance could possibly be adopted; however, Commissioner Campbell reiterated that this was just talk. Nothing has formally been done. Commissioner Campbell stated that some points have come to the Commission that do not reflect well on the CAFOs in the County. Commissioner Campbell addressed the issue of applicators running up and down the road from the lagoon to the land where the manure is going to be applied. In this case manure is spilled on the roads and the neighbors do not like it. Additionally these full applicators are tearing up the county roads. Commissioner Campbell asked the producers to try to use good judgment when hauling and spreading manure. Be as clean as possible when hauling manure and, while the process is weather permitting, try to work the manure in as quickly as possible when spreading to help the smell and nutrient levels. Problems from dairies are getting blamed on CAFOs. Commissioner Campbell asked the producers to be aware of their neighbors. Please watch for drainage on your neighbors property if you cannot work the manure in quickly. He restated that these are merely points the Commission was asked to address. The Commission is not trying to govern the dairies. He then asked Presiding Commissioner Mike Stephenson and Commissioner Denis (Deny) Clatt if they had anything else to address.

Presiding Commissioner Stephenson and Commissioner Clatt replied that Commissioner Campbell had addressed all their concerns.

Mr. Edwin Brubaker addressed the audience about local dairy farms. He stated that there are currently 39 dairy farms in Scotland County, and those dairy farms employee approximately 50 families. He commented that these 39 dairies combined have around 3,000 cows, and last year those farms generated nearly $10 million in revenue. According to his statistics, each dollar generated by these dairies turns over seven times within the County equaling a $70 million impact on the County. The 39 local dairies paid approximately $100,000.00 in county taxes. Mr. Brubaker then spoke about some concerns he had with the proposed health ordinance. He stated that if a producer expands his business he will fall under the proposed ordinance because of the way it is written. He was also concerned about the citizens advisory board being composed of non-CAFO people. Mr. Brubaker felt that non-producers would not be qualified to be on the advisory board, and suggested that it would be difficult to determine who, besides employees of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR), would be qualified to be on that board. Mr. Brubaker said that all Grade A dairies must have an approved sewage system for their homes; whereas most country homes merely drain sewage into the grader ditch. He asked how water quality was affected differently between manure from a confinement and manure from a home. Mr. Brubaker addressed the problem of manure being spilled on the roads. He believes that all producers have the responsibility to be a good neighbor. While mistakes happen, there should be a plan of action in place to clean the spill. He suggested that the careless producers should have to clean the mess and fix the road. Mr. Brubaker also commented that grain trucks also tear up the rock roads, but they do not stink.

Dave Drenum with Missouri Dairy Association stated that there are only 18 counties in Missouri with a health ordinance. The Dairy Association is opposed to these ordinances because more restrictions results in increased costs to the producers. Missouri is a milk-deficit state (i.e. we haul more milk into Missouri than we produce), so he believes that the state needs more dairies. Increasing cost of production is not going to increase dairies. Mr. Drenum clarified that 210 cows equals 300 Animal Units (AU) (0.7 of a cow equals 1 AU). Producers must remember that all animals, hogs, dairy cows, dry cows, etc., are considered when figuring total AUs. The average dairy is 65 cows, however most dairies around here are smaller. Mr. Drenum believes that the proposed ordinance does not offer practical solutions for producers. The proposed ordinance mandates disposal of dead animals within 24 hours. This is not feasible because new laws require dead animals to have the brain and spinal cord removed. Not many rendering companies can do this without passing the cost on to the producer. Mr. Drenum also said that knifing in the manure would not be feasible. He expressed the need to adopt a Best Management Practices policy, not an ordinance. Dairies do not need an ordinance because they are highly inspected since they are dealing with a perishable product. Mr. Drenum introduced Kevin Frankenbock from Marion County, and stated that Barry Stevens at the University would be willing to help anyone with questions about this ordinance.

Jerry Foster, Cargill Environmental Manager (and past DNR employee) stated that 0.7 of a cow is 1 AU, and an animal counts once it is weaned. Mr. Foster informed the audience that DNR has composed an odor commission, but it only regulates Class IA Operations (Sharps is the only one in the state). This commission is backed by the Missouri Clean Air Commission. Mr. Foster said that DNR is also looking at new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) laws and what effect they would have on Missouri Law affecting CAFOs.

Gigi Wahba asked Mr. Brubaker if dairies would be affected by this ordinance because they did not confine their cows for a 45-day period. Mr. Brubaker said that they take their cows to the barns every day, and that counts as confinement, thus the ordinance affects the dairies.

Mr. Drenum recognized Larry Frederick from Baring, who is also with the Missouri Dairy Association. He then asked Mr. Foster to answer questions from the audience.

Mr. Foster began by clarifying that he is no longer a DNR employee; he is a Cargill employee. If anyone has any questions for DNR he advised them to contact Joe England at DNR in Jefferson City (800) 361-4827 or Joe Bowdish at the Macon office.

Presiding Commissioner Stephenson asked Mr. Foster if he felt that state regulations were coming closer to regulating these CAFOs.

Mr. Foster replied that he felt state regulations were becoming more strict because they are developing a new nutrient management technical standard.

Mr. Jay Sensenig asked Mr. Foster about the proposed ordinance requiring the producer to inject manure 8 inches deep.

Mr. Foster stated that injecting manure 8 inches is a pretty severe requirement. He also replied that injecting the manure too deep causes more problems. For example, manure injected past the level where breakdown occurs would cause the manure to stay in the ground. Mr. Foster referred the question to Bryan Ripland, agronomist with Pennacal.

Mr. Ripland replied that he would be worried about injecting manure 8 inches because the root systems cannot get down that far in a wet year. Mr. Ripland went on to say that this proposed ordinance has some scary things in it. He asked who would regulate the ordinance. Who would be conducting the soil testing, and paying for that testing with the price of things going up? He suggested spending that money on educating producers as to what the County expected of them. Perhaps, he suggested, the County would be better off being proactive than reactive.

Commissioner Clatt asked Mr. Ripland how deep he would knife in the manure. Mr. Ripland replied that he thought 6 inches was ideal that way the manure is just covered and gets to where the roots are located.

Mr. Foster asked if injecting was always appropriate as some land is not suitable for injecting.

Mr. Brubaker commented that it is nearly impossible to inject dairy manure.

Mr. Ripland agreed with Mr. Brubaker as diary manure has more solids than hog manure. A larger injector would be required and add cost to the producer.

Commissioner Clatt asked Mr. Brubaker if he could disc in the manure immediately after spreading. Brubaker replied that the manure had to have time to dry before discing it in or he would get stuck.

Mr. Ripland said it would take a lot of time and money to do the testing this proposed ordinance requires and it would be difficult to prove the testing was actually being done. He also said the producers would have to be educated on how to do the testing.

Ms. Wahba stated that she is part of the group advocating the ordinance. She said that hog manure is different from dairy manure because of the antibiotics and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) being fed to the hogs. She suggested that the dairymen were being told this ordinance would apply to them in the future and she does not think they should believe it.

Mr. Ripland asked Ms. Wahba to whom this ordinance would apply. Ms. Wahba replied that this ordinance would apply to animals that are indoors all the time. There are 8 to 10 facilities in the County now, but the factory system has problems.

Mr. Ripland asked Ms. Wahba if those animals in confinements are treated differently from animals on pasture.

Ms. Wahba responded that animals in confinements are treated differently because they are fed large amounts of antibiotics and GMOs.

A gentleman stated that he had sows outside for years and recently moved them inside. Now he has large amounts of manure to haul out of his pit. He would like to know where all that manure went when the sows were outside.

Mr. Foster addressed the Commission by asking them to consider three questions. First, where do regulations stop? He questioned if the Commission was going to stop farmers from planting round-up ready soybeans (also a GMO)? He asked the Commission to consider land values. In his experience, land values are lower where ordinances are in place. Last he asked the Commission to consider what was driving this ordinance-health, social, or economic concerns.

An individual asked how manure compared to anhydrous.

Mr. Foster replied that manure is more natural than anhydrous; however, all things should be used in moderation. Anhydrous has more phosphorus than manure, which burns up earthworms and other microbes. As long as manure is not injected too deep it works with microbes to add organic matter (which soil in this area is lacking) to the soil. Anhydrous breaks down organic matter.

Kevin Frankenbock from Marion County said that Marion County threw out their ordinance. The Commission had a group of people come to them requesting to reinstate the ordinance. The Commission said they had no intent to do so, so the group went to the County Health Board and got the ordinance reinstated. He said that anytime the county did a referendum the producers won hands down.

Presiding Commissioner Stephenson apologized to all the producers in attendance for ever supporting the ordinance, and stated that he would continue to oppose reinstating the ordinance. He was received with ovations from the crowd.

Tim Steinkamp with Cargill spoke about confining animals and feeding them GMOs. He stated that this ordinance is a vehicle to stop commercial livestock production in Scotland County.

Dee Ruth asked the Commission how they would handle this proposed ordinance as they did not enforce the previous ordinance. She feels that producers need only be regulated by DNR.

A gentleman asked how much revenue a CAFO generates.

Mr. Frakenbock estimated that a 5,000 head unit would generate approximately $7,000 in tax revenue.

The Commission asked if they had this ordinance and it drove the numbers down what would they do to make up the revenue for schools.

The Commission replied that they did not heavily rely on this income, but if they did the only option they would have would be to raise the tax levy for the school.

Garth Lloyd said that he detected fear in the room. He said that the last ordinance did not affect the dairies and this one would not either.

Many dairy producers stated that this ordinance would affect them.

Mr. Clyde Zimmerman closed the meeting.

White Friend, Where to Begin…

White Friend, Where to Begin…

Taken from the Blog Run the Race, published by former SCR-I graduate Nicki (Webber) Moore who currently serves as the Athletic Director for the University of North Carolina.

 “Black people don’t need to be convinced that anti-black racism, structural inequity and skin privilege are facts; white people do… White people have to do the hard work of figuring out the best ways to educate themselves and each other about racism. And I don’t know what that looks like, because that is not my work, or the work of other black people, to figure out. In fact, the demand placed on black people to essentially teach white folk how not to be racist or complicit in structural racism is itself an exercise of willful ignorance and laziness.”Darnell L. Moore, senior editor at Mic and co-managing editor of The Feminist Wire.

In the wake of yet another two police shootings of young black men, I am moved even further this time toward, and perhaps finally beyond the edge of my comfort zone. Sitting in the St. Louis airport returning home from a vacation, during which per usual I did not have to think about my race, I watched the Diamond Reynolds’ live stream unfold followed by President Obama pleading with us to be better than this, I realized I can not remain on the sidelines.

I don’t know where to start, but neither do most of my white friends and family. And, if it is up to us to fix ourselves, and I allow myself to be paralyzed by my fear, my busy-ness and my not-knowing, how can I sincerely hope that we will ever get better? When you consider that I have even been trained in these matters, have spent hours soul-searching, reading and conversing, and have a sincere desire to help, an even gloomier picture is painted when I am not actively, consistently involved in doing something – anything.

I am ashamed to admit that I’ve tried to shake it…that sneaking feeling I have had when hearing the Edmund Burke quote, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” It’s been there – in the back of my head, or a corner of my heart – a sense of some kind that I am part of the race problem in our country if I’m not actively working to be part of the solution. I tell myself I’m busy. I tell myself I AM actively working – internally. I quiet that feeling by reminding myself that I have a demanding career, a family to support guide and enjoy, extended family to encourage and a home to keep. I’m doing things that help people in other ways. I retweet articles that strike a chord with me and that feel like they are centrist enough that they won’t terribly offend, turn off or further alienate my largely-white network of friends, colleagues and acquaintances.

But, it’s not enough. It isn’t even CLOSE to enough. Just like I want more men to start doing the work with other men to sincerely understand that women are their EQUALS – not because they are someone whom they possess (their moms, their daughters, their sisters, their aunts) – but because we are fellow human beings. Period. Anyway – I know that women can’t solve the problem of male privilegemisogyny, and everyday sexism without men being 1) aware of it, 2) educated about it, 3) moved to a point of action about it, 4) taking consistent, constructive action to change themselves, 5) taking consistent, constructive action to advocate change among others, and 6) taking consistent, constructive action to change the plethora of systems that quietly perpetuate current norms.

By the same token, people of color (try as they may) can not do this work of fixing our society, our culture, our country alone. White people carry an enormous share of the power and privilege and leverage available in our country, even though most of us are unaware of this fact. My white friends, if we want a country that is stronger, healthier, smarter, more Godly, more wealthy, more fair and more free, WE MUST DO OUR PARTS TO ADDRESS THE RACE ISSUES IN OUR COUNTRY. These issues belong to all of us, even if you can’t see it just yet – please trust that each of us can do something to help.

Stumble as I may, screw up as I will, I am going to try to help. Please come along with me to daily think about and generate action. Let’s start today.

Suggested action: Grab a journal and respond to these 3 questions:

How might I possess privilege (defined as “when one group has something of value that is denied to others simply because of the groups they belong to, rather than because of anything they’ve done or failed to do.” ~Peggy McIntosh)? Some categories to consider:

Race

Gender

Citizenship

Class

Sexual orientation

Ability

Religion

Physical stature

Health

How might my privilege in any of these categories affect how I perceive someone or act toward someone who has less privilege in the same category?

What is one thing I can do today to use my privilege to enhance the life of someone else who lacks that same privilege?

I’ll do the same, and I’ll share the results with you in the next couple of days. Maybe some good ideas for actions will result. Maybe we can begin to peer outside of our comfortable positions of privilege to contribute in a more proactive, tangible, real way to making our small corners of this world a more equal, respected and loving space.

I expect it will be painful, I expect it’ll take some of my all-too-scarce time, and I expect it to be an inconvenience. I also know with certainty that if I get to the end of my life not having tried a little harder because it hurt a little, took some time and was inconvenient, that I will have defaulted on the glorious loan of life my God has given me. Who knows – it might actually work, it might in fact add a little light to the darkness, and it might be a rich adventure.

Scotland County Health Department Schedule

Thursday, July 21 – Clinic hours from 8-10:00 a.m. for immunizations. Nurse available at the Scotland County Nutrition Site for blood pressure checks from 11:00 a.m. to Noon.

Friday, July 22 – Clinic hours from 8:00-3:30 for fasting blood sugars, cholesterols and blood draws, blood pressure checks, immunizations, nail care, etc.

Tuesday, July 26 – Clinic hours from 8-9:00 a.m. for fasting blood sugars and cholesterols and blood draws and from 12-2:30 p.m. for immunizations, blood pressure checks, nail care, etc.

Thursday, July 28 – Clinic hours from 8-10:00 a.m. for immunizations.

Greenley Research Center Field Day to Focus on Battling a Challenging Growing Season 

Kelly Nelson, research agronomist, will be one of several presenters during the 39th annual Greenley Research Center Field Day in Novelty, MO.  Photo by Logan Jackson, University of Missouri

Kelly Nelson, research agronomist, will be one of several presenters during the 39th annual Greenley Research Center Field Day in Novelty, MO. Photo by Logan Jackson, University of Missouri

This growing season has been a challenging one so far, with early dry conditions and escalating weed control problems.

The Greenley Research Center will cover both of these management issues during its 39th annual Field Day on Tuesday, August 9.

The agronomy tour will address innovative irrigation options in both corn and soybeans. There will be a follow-up presentation to the drip-tape irrigation system that was installed as part of Greenley’s Field Day in 2014. Results from its long-term drainage and subirrigation work focusing on yield variability will also be presented.

“We are currently utilizing both the drip-tape and subsurface irrigation systems this year,” said Dana Harder, Greenley superintendent. “Last year, it was so wet the systems were not used, so it will be good to see them in action.”

The pest management tour is back after a year hiatus to focus on cover crops in 2015.

“Weed control has been a big issue this growing season,” Harder added.

Weed science related presentations will be a focal point of the tour, which includes discussions on field pennycress and the importance of cleaning spray equipment. Field pennycress is traditionally a winter annual weed but is now being used as a biofuel and cover crop. Logan Bishop, a University of Missouri graduate student in plant, insect and microbial science, will showcase Greenley’s findings on the influence of field pennycress seeding dates into corn and how various corn herbicide programs affect field pennycress yield.

“Our work is focused on developing the agronomic management of field pennycress as a crop,” Harder said. “We have data-driven results to present from our initial trials.”

Along with the agronomy and pest management tour, there will be a beef tour. Topics include toxic plants and substances for beef cattle, pasture weed control management, and artificial insemination protocol evaluations for mature beef cattle.

Randy Miles, associate professor emeritus in soil science, will give soil health demonstrations throughout the Field Day. The University of Missouri-Kansas City AgrAbility Pharm to Farm Project will also conduct free personal health screenings for interested attendees.

The Field Day is free and open to the public. A free breakfast begins at 7 a.m., with tours beginning at 8 a.m. There will also be a program at noon that includes a free lunch. After the program, attendees can learn more about the MU Drainage and Subirrigation research conducted at Greenley.

The Greenley Research Center is located at 64399 Greenley Place in Novelty, Mo. For more information about the Field Day, call (660) 739-4410 or email Dana Harder at harderd@missouri.edu. For more information about the Greenley Research Center, visit greenley.cafnr.org

Clarity, Conviction and Integrity

Missouri desperately needs leaders of clarity, conviction and integrity. This year, we’re blessed to have an excellent slate of conservative candidates for statewide office. While any of them would be far more capable than their liberal counterparts, there are a few that stand out from the crowd.

For the past eight years, we’ve seen the damage that can be done by a liberal, career politician who has been more focused on the next office he can run for rather than focusing on the Missourians he was elected to represent. Jay Nixon has seemingly been absent from the office outside of making sure to veto as many bills as possible that were passed by our Republican legislature. It’s time to send a conservative outsider who won’t be afraid to roll up his sleeves and get Missouri moving again. Eric Greitens is the perfect fit for this need. Eric had the courage to fight for our freedoms in four deployments as a Navy Seal and we can count on him to fight for us as Missouri’s next Governor.

In the race to be Missouri’s next Lieutenant Governor, Bev Randles is the proven conservative we need. Though she is new to running for public office, Bev Randles is not new to the conservative fight. For over a decade, she has been involved in grassroots efforts to promote various issues, including standing up to the Nixon administration and securing the first income tax cut for hardworking Missourians in nearly 100 years. Bev knows that government doesn’t create jobs, our small business owners do As Missouri’s next Lieutenant Governor, we can count on her to continue to fight for limited government and stand up for the values we all hold dear.

When it comes to Missouri’s next Attorney General, we need an Attorney General who will fight for all Missourians and not cower to the liberal left. Kurt Schaefer is a proven prosecutor with a record of protecting our communities and standing up for what is right. As a prosecutor, Kurt Schaefer put away hundreds of dangerous criminals. In the Missouri Senate, Kurt has been a bulldog for our constitutional rights. In fact, Kurt fought against billionaire Michael Bloomberg’s anti-gun group and won. As the chairman of the Sanctity of Life Committee, he stood tall against attacks from the left and defunded Planned Parenthood in Missouri. He’s endorsed by the NRA, the Missouri State Troopers Association, Missouri Right to Life, and several of Missouri’s agriculture groups. With dangerous mandates coming down from Washington, D.C. that target our constitutional rights, we can count on Kurt Schaefer to fight back.

For too long, liberal Secretaries of State have used the office to advance their agenda. In fact, since 1945, Missouri has only had two Republican Secretaries of State. With Jay Ashcroft, we have the chance to send a principled, consistent conservative to Jefferson City to ensure our elections are fair and free from corruption. Jay has been a tireless proponent of photo voter ID in Missouri which will root out fraud and ensure that folks who vote are who they say they are, and ensure our elections are fair. Jay also knows that burdensome regulation stifle our economy. He will be an advocate for small businesses and farmers by streamlining the process for creating a business and stopping unconstitutional job-killing regulations.

I encourage you to get out and vote on August 2nd for these outstanding conservatives. Together, we can get Missouri back on track.

Ron Alexander

Memphis, MO

Scotland County Senior Nutrition Center

MENU

Thursday, July 21 – Salisbury Steak, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Veggie Jell-O Salad, Bread, Baked Apples

Friday, July 22 – BBQ Ribs, Parsley Potatoes, 3 Bean Salad, Wheat Roll, Blackberry Cobbler

Monday, July 25 – Liver and Onions or Chicken Patty, Scalloped Corn, Buttered Beats, Cottage Cheese, Bread, Pears

Tuesday, July 26 – Roast Pork, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Green Beans, Cranberry Sauce, Slice Bread, Ice Cream

Wednesday, July 27 – Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Marinated Carrots, Wheat Roll, Fruit

Thursday, July 28 – Meatloaf, Mixed Vegetables, Cauliflower/Cheese Sauce, Bread, Peach Crisp

ACTIVITIES

Thursday, July 21 – Scotland County Health Department blood pressure checks here from 11:00 a.m. to Noon, Card Party at 1:00 p.m.

Thursday, July 28 – Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Scotland County Genealogical Society Holds July Meeting

The Scotland County Genealogical Society held their monthly meeting on Monday, July 11th with ten members present.  In the absence of President Darlene Johnston, Vice President, Twila Stevenson, called the meeting to order.

First, the secretary’s report was given with one correction being made followed by the treasury report.  Both reports were approved.

Under old business, some help was given by Dana Glasscock in our search for the Ft. Donnellson cemetery including location of the cemetery and persons buried there.  There were also some phone calls by other people that were very helpful in collecting information about the cemetery.

Under new business, plans for Antique Days in August were made.  Future refreshments and programming was also discussed.

The meeting was then closed for the program.

Two members from the Scotland County Ambulance District brought the new, recently purchased ambulance to demonstrate and answer questions.  The group learned that the ambulance is manned with two persons at all time.  One person is a Paramedic and the other an EMT.   When called out to an emergency, they are qualified to begin life-saving treatment to the injured or to someone having a heart attack.

One question asked was about addresses and how to make it easier for emergency personnel to know where they need to go.  The presenters suggested that one way to help, if you live in town, is to have your house number visible from the street.  Scotland County still doesn’t have E911 which would tell the dispatcher the exact address of where the call was coming from.  We are one of three or four counties left in the state that doesn’t have the E911 in place yet.

The new ambulance is American made in Sumner, Iowa and the first four wheel drive ambulance in our county.  The ambulance is equipped with a “power load” which is a lift in the truck that takes the cot from the ground up into the truck.  This feature is safer for both the EMS staff and the patient.

The new ambulance has all current safety features meeting or exceeding state regulations.  Funding for the ambulance came through a portion of the tax revenue that is allocated yearly to provide for the purchase of equipment for the EMS Department along with funding from the Scotland County Hospital.

This program was very educational and interesting to listen to.  Thanks to those who gave the presentation and thank you to all the ambulance crew and to the hospital for offering this service to our community.  It is much appreciated by all.

Submitted by Terry Arnold

Scotland County Oats Bus Holds July Meeting

The Scotland County Oats Bus meeting was held July 11, 2016 at the Nutrition Site.  Those present were Patti Brookhart, Lavaughn Ketchum, Benji Briggs, Barbara Cantril, Janessa Mathena and daughter Mary, and Clifford Ketchum, bus driver.

The meeting was called to order by chairman, Patti Brookhart and she also gave the prayer.

Roll Call and minutes of the last meeting were taken by secretary, Lavaughn Ketchum.  Barbara Cantril made a motion they be approved as read and Benji Briggs seconded it.

Patti Brookhart, acting treasurer, gave the financial report.

Some of the future trips were discussed.  No business from the Macon office was received.

Patti made a motion we adjourn and Barbara Cantril seconded it.

Submitted by Lavaughn Ketchum, Secretary

Area Moving On Program to Meet July 26th

The Scotland County Area Moving On Program will hold their monthly meeting on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 at the Methodist Church starting at 1:30 p.m.  This month’s program will be Soap, Socks and Such by Leslie Eggers and refreshments will be provided by Memphis Funeral Chapel.

If you have suffered a loss, the Area Moving On group helps provide support through caring confidential visiting and fellowship with others than have lost love ones by sharing support and friendship with each other.  This is a monthly meeting with the time and meeting place decided on by those attending.

For more information or to arrange for a ride, please call Nelda Billups (660-328-6367), Laura Schenk (660-465-7363) or Chris Tinkle, Program Coordinator (660-465-7322.

Local sponsors of the program include The Daisy Patch, US Bank, Rose Hardware, Payne Funeral Chapel, Memphis Funeral Home, Countryside Flowers, Community Bank of Memphis, and Exchange Bank of Northeast Missouri.

Funeral Services For Pearl Grubb Set for Thursday

Funeral services for Pearl Grubb, 91 of rural Memphis will be at 1:30 P.M. Thursday, July 21, 2016, at the United Methodist Church in Memphis with Pastor Paul Smith officiating. Interment will follow in the Memphis Cemetery.

Visitation is scheduled for Wednesday, July 20, 2016, from 12 to 8 p.m. at Payne’s with the family present to greet friends from 6 to 8 that evening.

Pearl passed away Saturday night, July 16, 2016, at the Blessing Hospital in Quincy, IL.

She is survived by her children, Russell Grubb and his wife Karen of Hannibal, MO, Elaine Briggs and her husband Richard of Memphis, Diane Duley and her husband Phil of Memphis and Jerry Grubb and his wife Lisa of Memphis, twelve grandchildren, thirteen great-grandchildren, a sister: Winnie Fish of Hillsdale, MI, along with several nieces and nephews and many friends.

Memorials are suggested to the Scotland County Nutrition Site, the Scotland County Health Department or the Memphis United Methodist Church in care of the Payne Funeral Chapel, 202 E. Madison St., Memphis, Missouri 63555.

Online condolences may be sent to the family by logging on to Payne’s at www.paynefuneralchapel.com

Arrangements have been entrusted to the care of the Payne Funeral Chapel in Memphis.

Gorin Fire Department Receives Funds from VFA Fire Department Matching Grant Program

Chris Sevits with the Missouri Department of Conversation Forestry Division is pictured here presenting a grant award in the amount of $2,855.48 to Gorin Fire Department Chief, Mike Parrish.  The grant is part of the Volunteer Fire Assistance (VFA) Fire Department Matching Grant Program.

Chris Sevits with the Missouri Department of Conversation Forestry Division is pictured here presenting a grant award in the amount of $2,855.48 to Gorin Fire Department Chief, Mike Parrish. The grant is part of the Volunteer Fire Assistance (VFA) Fire Department Matching Grant Program.

Gorin Fire Department Chief, Mike Parrish, was recently presented a check in the amount of $2,855.48 from a state matching funds program.

During July and August, matching funds grant checks for rural fire departments are being distributed by the Missouri Department of Conservation, Forestry Division staff.

One hundred fifty-six fire departments are receiving checks for up to $4,000.00 to help with the purchase of personal protective gear and firefighting equipment, for wildfire as well as structure fire suppression efforts.  The total funding awarded to Missouri fire departments through the matching funds grant program this year is $338,490.28.

Fire departments are required to match 50% of the funds which are provided by the Missouri Department of Conservation and the US Forest Service, Volunteer Fire Assistance Program.  Throughout the last 30 years, over $7.5 million has been distributed to rural fire departments to help them increase the safety of their firefighters and provide them with better firefighting equipment.

The total amount expended by the Gorin Fire Department, including the grant, was $5,805.00.  With this money, the department purchased five 5 gallon poly backpack pumps, one 1” yellow hose (100’ roll), one 1” nozzle pistol grip, two rechargeable flash lights, seven 1.5” fire hoses, four 2.5” fire hoses, and three 4” supply hoses.

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