April 10, 2008

BETTY GRACE BOURGEOIS
(1/5/1933 4/9/2008)



Betty Bourgeois, 75, of Wyaconda, died Wednesday, April 9, 2008 at her home.

She was born the daughter of Elza and Gracie (Herberth) Speer on January 5, 1933 near Bear Creek in Clark County, MO.

Betty married Raymond Bourgeois on October 1, 1950 in Clark County.

She was a member of the Liberty Baptist Church. Betty loved her grandchildren and her pets. She supported many causes and charities that helped animals.

She was preceded in death by her husband, four sisters, five brothers, three sisters-in-law, and four brothers-in-law.

She is survived by her children, Barb and husband Brian Slocum of Mt. Sterling, Iowa, Allen, Ronnie, and Larry Bourgeois, all of Wyaconda, Karen and husband Dan Handyside of Keokuk, and Junior Bourgeois of Quincy; her sisters, Edna Speer of Moberly and Verna McCollum of Taylor; a brother-in-law, Richard Murphy of LaBelle; a sister-in-law, Betty Speer of Kahoka; grandchildren, Kim Hayden, Amber Campbell, Amy Lovell and Hayley Handyside all of Keokuk, Tyler Bourgeois of Wyaconda, Lydia Bourgeois of Hamilton, IL, and Gracie Bourgeois of Wyaconda, and eight great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held April 12, at the Gerth Funeral Chapel in Wyaconda, MO, with the Rev. Ernest Deatrick officiating. Corey Baker, Tyler Bourgeois, Gary Lovell, Todd Karn, Caleb Hayden, and David St. Clair served as pallbearers. Burial was in the Wyaconda Cemetery.

Memorials are suggested to the Humane Society of Missouri and can be left at or mailed to the Gerth Funeral Service, 115 N. Main, Wyaconda MO 63474.

Condolences may be sent to Mrs. Bourgeois family via email at gerths@gerths.com.

Arrangements were under the direction of the Gerth Funeral Service from their Wyaconda chapel.

SCR-I School Menus

Breakfast

Thursday, February 22 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Friday, February 23 – Sausage/Gravy, Biscuits, Choice of Cereal, Blueberry Muffin, Banana, Juice/Milk

Monday, February 26 – French Toast Sticks, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Fruit Medley, Juice/Milk

Tuesday, February 27 – Cinnamon Rolls, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Slices, Juice/Milk

Wednesday, Feb. 28 – Blueberry Bagel/Cream Cheese, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Apple Wedges, Juice/Milk

Thursday, March 1 –

Lunch

Thursday, February 22 – Chili Soup, Chicken and Noodles Soup, Hamburger Bar, Grilled Cheese Sandwich, Pickle Spear, Cheese Stick, Saltine Crackers

Friday, February 23 – Bar BQ Pork Sandwich, Tuna Noodle Casserole, Potato Rounds, Buttered Corn, Ice Cream, Strawberries, Fresh Fruit

Monday, February 26 – Ham and Beans/Cornbread, Chicken Patty/Bun, 5th/6th Grade Chef Salad, Candied Sweet Potatoes, Cole Slaw, Mandarin Orange Slices, Fresh Fruit

Tuesday, February 27 – School Made Pizza, Beef and Bean Burrito, 5th/6th Grade Taco Bar, Vegetable Sticks/Dip, Vanilla Pudding, Applesauce, Fresh Fruit

Wednesday, Feb. 28 – Meatloaf, Sliced Ham, 5th/6th Grade Potato Bar, Scalloped Potatoes, Mixed Vegetables, Dinner Roll, Jell-o/Fruit

Scotland County Senior Nutrition Center

MENU

Thursday, February 22 – Liver and Onions or Chicken Mattie, Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, Bread, Fruit

Friday, February 23 – Fish Filets, Macaroni and Cheese, Baked Beans, Pickled Beets, Fruit Juice, Cornbread, Peanut Butter Dessert

Sunday, February 25 – 11:30-1:00 p.m.; Fundraiser Soup Lunch, Carry-Outs Available, Free Will Donation; call 465-7011

Monday, February 26 –

Goulash, Italian Blend Vegetables, Lettuce Salad, Hot Roll, Peach Crisp

Tuesday, February 27 – Salisbury Steak, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Buttered Carrots, Bread, 5 Cup Salad

Wed., February 28 – Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Green Beans, Hot Roll, Fruit Salad

ACTIVITIES

Wednesday, Feb. 21 – Board and Business Meeting at 1:00 p.m.

Thursday, February 22 – Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Sunday, February 25 – Fundraiser Soup Lunch from 11:30-1:00 p.m.  Free Will Donation; Carry Outs Available; Call 465-7011.

Monday, February 26 – AAA and Care Board Meeting in Shelbina at 10:00 a.m.

Thursday, March 1 – Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Jauflione Chapter NSDAR Hosts February Meeting

The ladies of the Jauflione Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution met in regular session on Friday, February 2, 2018 at the Scotland County RCF Meeting Room.

Regent June Kice called the meeting to order in ritualistic form. The roll call, A Valentine Verse, was answered by 16 members and one CAR member. Those attending were: Pamela Blaine, Connie Bratton, Grace Brown, Oleva Chance, Marlene Cowell, Verlee Dauma, Rhonda Davis, Ann Jutte, Debra Kauk, June Kice, Joan Meyer-Kice, Patricia Miller, Maxine Phillips, Susan Poole, Joan Rood, Treva Wittstock, and CAR member Katie Miller.

Chaplain’s message and prayer was given by Regent Kice.

CAR member, Katie Miller led the singing of the Star-Spangled Banner. Katie also read the Indian Minute. She gave a very interesting report on Sitting Bull.

President General’s message was read by Joan Meyer-Kice.

National Defense was given by Patricia Miller.

Constitution Minute was given by Verlee Dauma.

Secretary Rhonda Davis read the minutes of the January meeting. There was one correction made and the minutes were then approved.

Regent Kice gave the Treasurer’s Report, prepared by Treasurer Kathy Kiddoo.

Report of Officers was given by Registrar Patricia Miller. Patricia was happy to report that after 36 hours of research time she finally found all documentation needed to have paperwork for a prospective member sent in for approval. Patricia is working on documentation for four other prospective members.

Old Business: There are two suggestions for the World War 1 project. The first suggestion is planting flowers around the Barnett Statue Box. The original flowers were dug up and kept from when the statue was moved to town. The second suggestion is cleaning the Veterans Memorial in the court house yard. There was discussion about both projects. During the March meeting we will decide which we want to do and make plans for moving forward with the project. Another project discussed is the Cook Book that the Chapter is putting together. Anyone wanting to submit recipes please send them to Reta Stott. It was mentioned that our new members may want to submit their favorite recipe to Reta.

New Business: There was a report from the nominating committee for election of new officers. There were no nominations from the floor. All current officers have agreed to keep their positions. This does not include the Regent as there is a term limit for this position. The nominee for the Regent position is Debra Kauk. Thru the voting process, Debra will be installed as the new Regent of the Jauflione Chapter NSDAR. The MSSDAR State Conference will be held April 19-22, 2018 at the Kansas City Airport Hotel. Anyone interested in attending should contact Regent Kice. The program for this month, Your Favorite Antique Item was enjoyed by all. The meeting was adjourned.

Hostesses, Joan Meyer-Kice and Treva Wittstock served delicious refreshments. Social hour was enjoyed by all.

Seeds, Spirits, and Open Space Technology: A Dancing Rabbit Update

A group photo from Retreat 2018. Photo by Apple

It is often said that the first step toward a solution or significant change is admitting that you have a problem. When hints of spring start interrupting February’s winter cold, I realize that I have a problem. A gardening problem. Collating the results of hours spent with seed catalogs, I realize there is absolutely no way to fit everything into my garden. Clearly this is a problem.

Cob here, setting aside my internal dilemma over which varieties of what delicious fresh fruit or vegetable to let go of, to instead bring you up to date on the happenings from this past week on our small patch of prairie.

From overheard conversations and increasing garden-related email discussions, I know that I’m not the only one who struggles with balancing seed orders with available space or who wishes they had more hours to dedicate to growing food. This subject even came up during the second portion of our annual retreat.

These last several days of meetings are created on-the-spot, following the methods outlined by Open Space Technology (if you’re interested, read the book of the same name by Owen Harrison for deeper details). Essentially we self-organize on the fly, holding multiple meetings concurrently in several locations around the village, then come back together as a group to report on what we learned. The idea is that each person is involved in the topic(s) they feel most passionate about, and are motivated to bring through to a decision.

Many of this week’s breakout sessions referenced back to last week’s mini-workshop on burnout: what it is, how to minimize it, and ways to replenish and restore our mental & emotional reserves. It is easy to be so caught up in personal habits of thought or action, because it’s familiar or routine. Sometimes the simplest and retrospectively obvious changes don’t get made because those habits are so deeply ingrained or we don’t have the energy to try something different (see burnout).

Collaboration with seed ordering, both for cost savings and for diversity of species grown, and working with each other either physically or to share our individual wisdom and lessons learned seems fairly obvious; yet my years of “this is how I’ve always done it” gets in the way. I didn’t attend the “What we Grow” session at retreat, but I appreciated hearing that some Rabbits are interested in re-launching a weekly Garden Club to discuss things regularly over lunch, and was reminded that Alyssa had created a shared Google spreadsheet for noting which varieties grow most easily (or need the most coddling) in our particular location.

We also held conversations on a wide range of other topics, including determining what research is needed as our fossil-fuels covenant (wherein we agree that we won’t use fossil fuel to power our vehicles) collides with the reality that 2006 is the last model year for vehicles which can reliably run on biodiesel. Those changes stem from increased fuel-efficiency, so it’s not all bad, but it does leave us with an interesting conundrum.

Equally interesting and challenging was our wide-ranging conversation on what it means to be a feminist ecovillage, the myriad ways we are not living up to our full potential, and how to support each other in making the necessary cultural shifts to reach that goal. It quickly became even clearer to me that (unsurprisingly) my own unexamined habits of thought or behavior (as modeled for me while growing up white and male in our culture) are my primary obstacle to realizing my personal goal of truly treating every person as fully human/fully equal.

Not that every breakout session was so heavy! I was able to convene a session outside the regular schedule, just prior to potluck dinner, specifically to share a bottle of whisky. I am no connoisseur, but the provenance of this particular bottle practically demanded that I share it with Rabbits who are far more familiar with such spirits. I had no idea if it would be really good or really, really bad (spoiler: it was fantastic) which added to the fun.

If you have no interest in “The Whisky Bottle Story” feel free to skip to the next paragraph! This particular bottle of Old JTS Brown Kentucky straight bourbon whisky (old style sour mash) was given as a gift from my great-grandfather to either my folks or my grandparents, while attending “the races in KY” in 1962. According to the US Gov’t seal, it was bottled in the spring of 1958, and remained unopened for 60 years. The molded glass of the bottle also warns that “Federal law forbids sale or reuse of this bottle.” Y’all good with me re-using it as a water bottle? That’s what I thought.

One significant change in this year’s retreat was the level of involvement and support from the younger crowd (teens and pre-teens), participating in some of the breakout sessions and helping out with the really young crowd so parents could participate more fully. I’m excited by their interest in self-agency and bringing their perspectives to the conversation.

One session has left a lasting glow of good humor and friendship, and no it wasn’t the whisky! A number of Rabbits discussed and decided to participate in a 21-day complaint-free challenge. Sounds easy? It’s NOT! The goal isn’t to get through the next three weeks without complaining; the goal is 21 consecutive days. According to the pastor in Kansas City who launched this particular challenge, it often takes as long as 8 months to reach that milestone. I encourage you to google this challenge and consider joining along with us. The science behind the 21 days is that it takes that level of consistency to form a new habit. I’ve been working on this for 6 days now, and I’m still on Day 1, woo hoo!

Life doesn’t stop for retreat, so folks have been busy gearing up for the first public workshop of the season at the Milkweed Mercantile focusing on fiber arts; several Rabbits lovingly crafted Validation Day cards for every member of the community (I’m sure you’ll hear more about that in a future column); cooks from Dancing Rabbit and Red Earth Farms have been bringing meals over to Sandhill for a family and their new baby; and Ted and I have even made it into Memphis for a couple men’s chorus rehearsals. The chorus is rehearsing for Saturday’s fundraising dinner at the VFW in support of the SCR-1 marching band trip to Washington DC this spring.

Speaking of spring, I have a problem. My problem is seeds. What am I planting? What am I growing?  What am I cultivating in my own garden? What resources am I failing to notice? Or perhaps most importantly, what unintentional harm or pain am I causing for the individuals around me, within my community, or in the world? I have been privileged all my life to pretty much do whatever I’ve wanted to do, in whatever manner I wished. There is a level of comfort and ease with that familiarity, but as I prayerfully consider these questions I am seeing more and more how I need to make deep and lasting changes in my choices, regardless of which environment I’m in.

I wish you joy in the planning of your own gardens, both physical and metaphorical. Now where did I put that catalog?

Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage is an intentional community and educational nonprofit outside Rutledge, focused on demonstrating sustainable living possibilities. Public tours are offered April – October on the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the month. In the meantime you can find out more about us by checking out our website, www.dancingrabbit.org, calling the office at (660) 883-5511, or emailing us at dancingrabbit@ic.org.

Living Life Over

FIVE YEARS AGO

Strong northwest winds gusting up to 40 mph on Tuesday kicked off a winter storm outlook posted by the National Weather Service’s Quad Cities office February 19th.

A hazardous weather outlook was issued for northeast Missouri, southeast and east central Iowa and most of Illinois.

The NWS is forecasting significant snow activity in conjunction with the storm front.  A strong storm system will bring snow to the outlook area Thursday, with several inches of snow accumulation possible by Thursday evening.

TEN YEARS AGO

The fight against hunger has a new ally.  Once a month local residents can receive donated food items from the Scotland County Food Pantry.  Now residents will have a new tool to help stretch their food buying dollars.

Angel Food Ministries is a nationwide ministry that offers quality, frozen meats and name-brand vegetables at a reduced cost.  Angel Food Ministries has recently become available in this region under the care of the First Baptist Church of Kirksville.

The food ministry itself is not affiliated with any one denomination, but the process of ordering, delivery and distribution is more easily managed by a group such as a local church.  The ministry is currently being offered here in Memphis.

Monthly menus may be viewed at the Angel Food Ministries website www.angelfoodministries.com.

20 YEARS AGO

Sandra Thomas of Memphis has been selected finalist for Missouri’s 18th annual Homecoming Queen Selection to be held March 21 and 22, at the Kansas City Airport Marriott.

Sandra is the 1997 Scotland County R-1 High School Homecoming Queen.

Missouri’s Homecoming Queen will receive a cash scholarship plus an expense paid trip to compete with queens from the other states for America’s Homecoming Queen in July in California.

Sandra is the daughter of Judy Thomas of Memphis, and Randy Thomas of Arbela.

30 YEARS AGO

The Memphis Fire Department was called to the residence of Larry and Sandra Remley, 232 North Market, during the mid-morning of February 15th.

Smoke had filled the Remley home, and fire fighters determined the cause coming from the down draft of the flue.  There was no fire damage, however the house and contents received considerable smoke damage.

40 YEARS AGO

The U.S. Air Force has promoted Forrest M. Decker, son of Mr. and Mrs. Forrest Decker of 1337 N. Third, Quincy, IL, to the rank of technical sergeant.

Sergeant Decker is serving at Vandenberg AFB, California, as a missile trainer technician.

The sergeant is a 1963 graduate of Quincy High School and attended Westminster College at Fulton, MO, and Gem City College at Quincy.  His wife Gail, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clare Brookhart of Arbela, MO.

50 YEARS AGO

Over 150 persons attended the Hair Style Show at DeRosear’s House of Beauty Sunday, and witnessed the new hair styles being done on live models.  The new look, called “The Ruffled Curl Look for Spring and Summer”, which was styled by Alice Ewalt and floral accessories by Leo Shaw.  Blonds, Frosted Hair, Wigs and Hair pieces were used in the styling.

Dean DeRosear, Vice President of the State Board of Cosmetology, was the narrator.

60 YEARS AGO

Friday evening a group of members of Oak Ridge Baptist church and friends enjoyed a carry-in supper at the Homer Martin home.  After the supper, the evening was spent visiting.

Those present were Rev. and Mrs. Gerald Harrison, David, Donna, Rebecca, and Thomas, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Snelling, Mr. and Mrs. George Davis, Mr. and Mrs. George Fordney, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Meline, Sheriff and Mrs. O. M. Orton, Johnny and Jimmy, Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Woods, Randy and Charles Woods, Mrs. Rosa Rockwell, Rev. Gordon Lamb of Bloomfield, IA, Miss Georgia Lee Fordney, Lola May, and Carolyn Gragg and Mr. and Mrs. Homer Martin and Dean.

The Martin family are moving this week to Grandview, AK, where he has been called to full-time services at the First Baptist church.

70 YEARS AGO

The Dina-Car restaurant, which has been located on the Mulch lots across the street from the Standard Oil Station several years, has been moved to North Main Street, south of the building owned by C. C. McQuoid, a half block north of the northwest corner of the square.

John Turner shipped seventeen head of good young mules to Newbern, TN yesterday by Paul Drummond’s truck which he will sell down there.  Farming operations are now beginning in the south and good mules are in demand.

SC Genealogy Society Hosts February Meeting

On February 12, 2018, the Scotland County Genealogy Society met. 12 members were present and officers were sworn in by Marlene Cowell, President Treva Whitstock, Treasurer June Kice, Trustee Linda Larson, and Director Darlene Johnston.  The secretary’s report was given by Connie Bratton and the treasurer’s report was given by Ronda Davis. New business was setting a work schedule for the bake sale and old business consisted of getting address changes to Bonnie Hayes. A program was given by Nancy Platz and was assisted by Larry on 2009 pennies featuring Abraham Lincoln. The 1st penny log cabin 1809-1816 birth to childhood, 2nd formative years 1816-1830 Indiana, 3rd professional life 1830-1861 Illinois, and 4th president 1861-1865.

June Kice talked about the first Valentine’s Day and how it originated, the meeting adjourned and refreshments were served by Ronda Davis.

Submitted by: Connie Braton, Secretary

Rutledge Renegades

Katrina and Neta went to Quincy.  Katrina, Will and Waid, and Neta went to Kirksville.

Larry Tague said he is taking his wife, Tamara, to Quincy for her birthday and is spending gobs of money on her.  Tamara replied, “LOL!”

Ruby Red Hats of Rutledge went to the Memphis Pizza Hut on February 12th.  The next meeting will be March 19th at Keith’s in Memphis at 11:00 a.m. Marlene will serve as hostess.

Tamara Tague celebrated her birthday February 17th at Zimmerman’s Food Court.  Those attending were Larry Tague, Dale Tague, Doris Day, Don Tague, Trey Tague, Trevor and Travis, Neta Phillips, Ronnie Boyer, Tim Morris, Bob and Dorothy Hunolt, Leon Shaw, Sally Ebling, Mark Glasscock, Finley Heine, and Brant Heine.

Charlene Montgomery fell Saturday, February 17th and was taken by ambulance to Memphis hospital.  She dislocated her knee.  She is now home.

Others in this week were John and Shirley Henderson, LeRoy Huff, Kevin Good, Steve Goblentz, Milt Clary, Thomas Kortkamp, and Katherine Danson.

Happy Red Hatters Meet at The Grind

The Happy Red Hatters of Downing met Thursday, February 8, 2018, for lunch at The Grind in Downing, MO.  Hostesses were Arlene Stice and Marilyn Blessing.

Those present were Betty Anderson, Lena Gallagher, Louise Newland, Rosalie Kinney, Barbara Blessing, Virginia Mullinix, Arlene Stice, Carol Scurlock, Maudie Oliver, Sheri Laws, and Marilyn Blessing.

Rosalie Kinney and Marilyn Blessing read some humorous stories for the enjoyment of all.

Louise Newland and Glennis Ward are hostess for the March 8, 2018 meeting. We will meet at The Red Shed west of Bloomfield, IA for lunch.

Highway 15 Coalition Hears From Successful Taxing Entities

The push continues to create some form of special funding body to raise $1 million locally to construct shoulders on Highway 15 in Scotland County.  

Interested parties seeking to improve Highway 15 in Scotland County gathered on February 15th at the board room at the Northeast Regional Planning Commission office to hear from a pair of entities that have successfully utilized state taxing measures to leverage local monies to receive matching funds from the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) to make local highway improvements.

County Commissioner Glenn Eagan from Shelby County and Kirksville City Manager Mari Macomber were present to discuss projects that helped make improvements to Highway 36 and Highway 63 in their regions.

Eagen discussed a successful Transportation Development District (TDD) effort that was approved by residents in Monroe, Shelby, Macon and Marion counties that implemented a local sales tax in those four counties, earmarked for improvements on Highway 36. The TDD was formed to levy a 1/2 cent sales tax for 15 years to help fund a proposed $86 million in improvements to the region’s main highway system.

“We actually completed the project two and a half years early and had an election to close the TDD and stop the sales tax before its target date,” Eagan told the meeting.

Macomber stated the Highway 63 projects involving Kirksville used a different program. Instead of forming a TDD, the City of Kirksville and various other interested parties formed a transportation corporation and voters in the city approved an economic development sales tax that was earmarked for the Highway 63 improvements and then again for the city’s bypass, and now is in its third term with the fund now earmarked for city street improvements.

MoDOT district engineer Paul Gough explained that Kirksville’s model is rather unique, with just a handful of transportation corporation’s in effect in Missouri. The TDD is much more popular. Gough said there are currently 230 active TDDs in the state.

With that number expected to continue to grow in light of the state’s dwindling transportation funding, the local parties interested in identifying ways to improve Highway 15, appeared ready to move forward with consideration to form a local TDD.

Dr. Jeff Davis, one of the founding members of the local coalition, indicated efforts will be made to secure cost estimates for legal work required to form a TDD, the initial step in what could be a ballot issue to ask local voters to approve a special sales tax for Highway 15 improvements.

Macomber noted that in Kirksville, the city advanced the money for the costs of the legal work and other initial expenditures, with those costs ultimately being reimbursed from the sales tax revenues.

Private contributions from businesses and residents who will see the benefits of the proposed addition of 6-foot shoulders on Highway 15 across Scotland County, ultimately may be asked to help financially support the creation of the TDD if alternate funding sources cannot be identified.

The coalition tentatively scheduled a follow up meeting for March 15th with hopes of having cost estimates for the creation of a TDD as well as legal options for funding sources.

The meetings are open to the public and all interested parties are encouraged to participate in the project. For more information contact Lucinda Chubb at NEMO RPC.

SCR-I to Host Preschool Screening March 10th

Developmental, vision, hearing and health screenings will be conducted on Saturday, March 10, 2018 for children age three to Kindergarten age.  The preschool and Kindergarten screenings will be held at the Scotland County R-I Elementary School and will begin at 8:30 a.m.

Children who are eligible for Pre-school and Kindergarten (three years and beyond) are screened in the areas of vision, hearing, health, motor, speech/language, and pre-academic skills. Results are shared with the parents at the conclusion of the appointments.

Screenings are free and are provided by Scotland County R-I School and are available to children in the Scotland County R-I school district.

The screening is designed to answer questions parents may have about their child’s development and to refer children as needed to available education services.

Please call Linda Hervey at the Elementary Office at (660) 465-8532 to schedule an appointment.

If you have a child age 4 months – three years old and you are interested in a developmental screening, please contact Stephanie Shalley or Amanda Long with Parents as Teachers at 660-465-8532.

« Older Entries