April 5, 2007

Senate Bill 364 Could Remove Local Control of CAFO Decisions

The debate over Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO) took center stage in Scotland County more than three years ago when the Scotland County Commission enacted a health ordinance to regulate the spread of such facilities in the community.

The bill was enacted on October 14, 2004 to further regulate large concentrated animal feeding operations beyond the regulations in place through the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Since that date the county has issued three permits for CAFO facilities in Scotland County. All three have been for hog operations.

The county was at the forefront of a movement across the state to create more local control of an issue that centers around economic growth versus health and odor concerns. The ordinance was modeled after a similar law in Shelby County, one of just 10 counties at the time to have such laws on the books.

Since that time, several other counties have passed similar ordinances. However, recently this movement has hit a snag as state lawmakers are considering enacting legislation that would prohibit counties from enacting such guidelines.

Senate Bill 364, which is currently on the Senates informal calendar, would prohibit any county public health order, ordinance, rule, or regulation from applying to agricultural operations.

The act protects farms and farming-related activities from suits of nuisance or trespass for any condition resulting from, but not limited to, the acts of planting, cultivating, harvesting, mowing, applying pesticides or herbicides, land clearing, livestock management, or construction of farm roads, lakes, and ponds.

Farms or farming-related activities are not protected from suits of nuisance or trespass resulting from negligent conduct.

The act removes a provision stating that state regulation of certain concentrated animal feeding operations shall not be construed as restricting local control over concentrated animal feeding operations.

The bill originally came under fire but recent concessions have brought some support for a compromise.

The coalition of agricultural organizations supporting Senate Bill 364, the Missouri Farm and Food Preservation Act, has reached a major compromise with the Missouri Association of Counties (MAC) on a substitute bill that both groups have shown support for.

As introduced SB 364, sponsored by Senator Chris Koster from Harrisonville, would protect farmers from unjustified lawsuits and limit the regulation of agriculture to the state and federal levels.

The substitute version of SB 364 still contains both provisions; however, added to the legislation are several other changes that would limit the states largest animal feeding operations, set up a process for county input, increase setbacks in certain cases, and create incentives for using best management practices and odor control techniques.

The coalition of 19 agriculture organizations supporting this bill appreciates the willingness and desire of MAC to work together to find common ground on this legislation so vitally important to the future of agriculture in Missouri, said Charles E. Kruse, president of Missouri Farm Bureau. We initiated discussions with MAC even before SB 364 was introduced, and Senator Koster should be commended for his leadership in bringing both sides together to work out our major differences.

In addition to protecting farmers from unjustified lawsuits and regulations, the following 10 new provisions were added with the substitute bill:

1) No new Class 1A (the states largest) concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) in any county unless approved by the county commission.

2) Increased setbacks for new CAFOs not designated as a Managed Environmental Livestock Operation (MELO).

3) New MELO best management standards to aid in the neighbor and community acceptance of CAFOs.

4) County health ordinances regulating CAFOs remain in effect until MELO standards are developed and then the county ordinances would expire.

5) Creation of a CAFO Review Board with authority to review and have input on the Department of Natural Resources livestock facility permits and develop the MELO standards.

6) Increased state regulations for new livestock facilities greater than 650 animal units.

7) Increased setbacks from specified lakes for new CAFOs of any size greater than 650 animal units.

8) Increased size and expanded use of the livestock lagoon indemnity fund.

9) Authorization of state tax credits to address issues such as odor control abatement and infrastructure improvements.

10) Grandfather in existing CAFOs, which would still be required to comply with state and federal regulations protecting public health and the environment.

Contrary to what some opponents have said concerning SB 364, nothing in this legislation, as introduced or amended, would allow farmers and ranchers to pollute the environment and ignore compliance with state and federal laws, said Don Nikodim, executive vice president of the Missouri Pork Association. Regrettably, those who claim SB 364 has a hidden agenda are only misleading the public!

According to the Missouri Corn Growers Association CEO Gary Marshall, Agriculture and county governments have worked together constructively and in good faith to find common ground. The compromises reached are reasonable and in the best interest of farmers, consumers and a continued safe and affordable domestic food supply. No American wants to depend upon foreign food like we depend upon foreign oil today.

But the compromise has not been met with similar warm sentiments from all involved parties.

On April 2nd the Linn County Commissioners sent a letter to the staff and leadership of the Missouri Association of Counties (MAC) and the County Commissioner Association of Missouri (CCAM) requesting that they rescind the Associations letter of support for a proposed compromise on Senate Bill 364.

According to the Linn County letter, the commissioners are prepared to file an injunction if MAC/CCAM has not abided by existing by-laws and does not withdraw support for the bill.

We voted on proposed CAFO standards at the MAC meeting in November, stated Linn County Commissioners, Jim Libby and Randy Wade. At that time we were assured there would be no deviation from those proposals. But this compromise contains new language that had not been voted on, or even seen, by the majority of MAC/CCAM membership.

The commissioners say that the Executive Director of MAC/CCAM, Dick Burke, did not have the authority to sign on to a letter in support of the compromise bill because MAC/CCAM membership did not have the opportunity to vote on it.

According to Linn County Commissioners, Jim Libby and Randy Wade, the MAC/CCAM process was not open or transparent.

At this point MAC/CCAM should oppose Senate Bill 364 and start over with a process for next year that ensures that MAC/CCAM will work with all interested parties to reach a position that everyone can live with, they stated.

On the other side of the fence the group Missourians for Local Control has voiced its opposition to the compromise.

The group calls the compromise a deal between industrial livestock supporters (i.e. the Missouri Farm Bureau) and a six-member CAFO task force of the Missouri Association of Counties, adding that it does nothing to address the concerns voiced by thousands of farmers and property owners in opposition to Senate Bill 364. This opposition to the bill was a result of its anti-local control and anti-property rights agenda, says the group.

These opponents of the bill state the compromise still takes away authority of local elected representatives to protect the health, welfare and property rights of the majority of family farmers, landowners and rural citizens. It also still abolishes constitutional rights of farmers and property owners to defend their property through legal challenges when the negative impacts of corporate livestock factories infringe upon their property rights.

We have been very clear that our opposition to Senate Bill 364 is based on its blatant attack on local control and property rights, said Rhonda Perry, livestock and grain farmer from Howard County and Program Director of the Missouri Rural Crisis Center. Simply adding fourteen pages of language about how the state is going to take care of the CAFO issue does not change the truththis bill is about protecting corporate agri-business at the expense of local control and the property rights of the majority of family farmers and rural landowners,

The group argues that if this bill passes, counties and their local elected representatives will lose the only mechanism they have for protecting citizens from the well-documented impacts associated with CAFOs.

Many county commissioners continue to oppose the bill.

Schuyler County Commissioner James Werner said as county commissioners, we oppose Senate Bill 364, or any bill, that takes local control away from the counties.

It appears that the goal of the Farm Bureau and Senate Bill 364 is to get local government, and therefore local people, out of the way, stated Terry Spence, livestock farmer from Putnum County. This is an attempt to take the livestock industry out of the hands of independent and entrepreneurial producers, but we, as Missouris independent family farmers, cannot and will not let that happen,

Might We Need To Change Our Inner Password?

I don’t know how to say what I’m about to say–what I want to say–to you at this very moment.  Believe me.  My (com)passion is charged and ready to express in deep meaning the value that I see in you and how much I believe that each is basically unaware of your own profound depth of wonder.

Mankind is stripped of its potential because Satan’s original work in the Garden divided us.  Oh, I don’t mean that such division is merely one against another.  No, I mean that we entered a zone where we are divided against ourselves.  We want to be effective; yet, find ourselves plagued with failing moments.  We desire to really be alive only to spend far too much time in dread of a day or an event or of a person.

This is why faith enters the picture.  It is a warrior against fear for fear still wants to be the Boss.  That’s what happened to Adam and Eve.  They simply became afraid….and many have never gotten over what we inherited from them.  Yet Jesus, at our rebirth, very much does reopen one’s potential and possibility in a whole new power display.

From Princess to Pauper, we are all the same; wanting to be more than we are and blinded to our own positive dynamic at any given moment.  Don’t misunderstand.  I’m not promoting rude self-centeredness.  But rather, I’m wishing to draw out an inner confidence embedded within us by the intentional design of the Holy Spirit of God.

Individuals do not grasp just how deeply wonderful they/you are.  Thus, we perpetually thirst for something more without realizing we are currently and valuably very much, very sharp, very effective, and very meaningful.  This is not to brush against one’s ego; but rather, to dip into His Supply.  So how do we reverse this mistaken daily tendency of missing His glory within our very own interior?

Realize that we are all the same.  When I was entering the sales world as a 20-something, before I seriously entered into ministry, I was highly intimidated by any of slightest power.  How many times I heard from my colleagues, Hey, they all put their pants on one leg at a time.  But this didn’t help… and I failed.

When I eventually entered into ministry, I was plagued by the very identical insecurity.  This is a part of the reason that it wasn’t until my senior segment of Preaching School that I was sent out into area churches to preach (while all other students began such an experience in their sophomore term).  I. Couldn’t.  Do.  It.

I was scared.  Fear drove my every day.  But little by little, I gained confidence in Him.  I never gained confidence in myself (to this day).  Yet, the key was increasing in assurance of His absolute presence and His productivity.  I actually began to believe; to trust God.  Count.  Me.  In.

My burden for you is that I believe that every person on earth battles insecurities galore.  This, then, carries an inner defense mechanism within our thinking that goes unchecked.  We refuse to learn new ways for we are protecting what little security we dare think we possess.  We take the talent He gives us and we hide it. We hoard it for fear that it, too, will diminish.

Often we balk at the very idea of just trying.  This very practice reduces blessings for those in your path as well as your own potential ones for you would rather play life safe.  There is nothing safe about this for it is robbing you of the real you.  This is your personal Thief.

Whether you are my friend or are my foe, I cheer you on.  Dare to open up your heart to your dreams and imaginations.  Quit playing it safe.  Refuse to hide within your manageable schedules and controlled talents.  Explore.  Dream. Imagine.

And then…. dare to step out of your comfort zone and into His.  Nothing in life has us trapped by enemy pursuants but what God cannot part your Red Sea and provide a way of escape into the unknown wonder of your very own Promised Land!

Change your inner password from I’MAFRAIDI’LLFAIL to GODLET’SGOFORTHEVICTORY.

SCAPP to Host Celebrity Showmanship Event at 2017 Fair

The Scotland County After-Prom Parents are teaming up with the 2017 Scotland County Fair to bring some new entertainment to the summer event while helping raise money for the 2018 SCR-I after-prom party.

The group will host the Celebrity Showmanship contest at the fair on Wednesday, July 12th at 6 p.m.

Nominations are being accepted for any “celebrity” to show in special swine, goat, sheep and chicken shows at the fair that evening.

Cost is $20 to nominate a celebrity, which can include students, athletes, business owners, community members, church family, or just about anyone the nominator would like to see participate in the show.

A winner will be chosen for each livestock category, earning a special prize as well as the right to advance to the round robin show, where the top four participants will compete against one another in showing all four types of livestock to produce a grand champion.

To nominate participants, contact Dawn Triplett (660-341-0233), Melissa Anders (660-341-8969, or Tonya Harrison (660-341-1322. Nominee forms will also  be available at the Memphis Democrat.

The event is being sponsored by the SCR-I class of 2019 Scotland County After-Prom Parents.

Gilliam Family Illusions, United FMX FreeStyle Stunt Team to Perform at 2017 SC Fair

Members of the Gilliam family are pictured here performing their acts of illusion. They will perform at this year’s Scotland County Fair on Tuesday evening, July 11th at 6:00 p.m.

Gilliam Family Illusions will open Tuesday evening’s grandstand entertainment at this year’s Scotland County Fair on July 11th starting at 6:00 p.m.

Gilliam Family Illusions is a show involving their entire family.  They offer a fast-paced, contemporary presentation for audiences of today.  Energy level is kept high with the use of a lot of music.  But the most important aspect of the show is they share the message of the Gospel in a way the audience will understand and remember!

The evening’s entertainment won’t stop there.  Terry Russell with United FMX FreeStyle Stunt Team will perform at 8:00 p.m.

Terry Russell with United FMX FreeStyle Stunt Team will the entertain grandstand crowd at this year’s Scotland County Fair. His show begins at 8:00 p.m. Tuesday, July 11th.

United FMX is a faith based freestyle motocross team that features experienced riders and a complete ramp-to-ramp setup.  They ensure a family-friendly, exciting, action sports exhibition.

Terry Russell, born in 1979, calls Jefferson City his hometown.  He started riding at the age of five.

Terry will host a meet and greet immediately following his show.

Missouri Street to be Resurfaced This Summer

Missouri Street in Memphis is set to get a nearly $85,000 facelift this summer after the Memphis City Council approved a bid from W. L. Miller Company of Hamilton, IL to resurface the city street.

The contract calls for roughly 58,000 square feet of asphalt to be installed by the contractor to create a new two-inch thick driving surface. W.L. Miller Company will also performing milling at all crossroads, along concrete curbing as well as driveways that will be impacted by the new road surface.

The work, which is scheduled to be done later this summer, will run from the Main Street intersection west to the end of the street, approximately eight city blocks. The project comes on the heels of last year’s municipal project installing new water lines along the same route. With the new lines in place, which should eliminate the need for disturbing the road for underground repairs, the city elected to pursue the better driving surface, a practice that has been followed on several other streets in the past decade.

City Superintendent Roy Monroe noted that the project will also including paving of the south parking lot at the Memphis Swimming Pool, which is located north off of Missouri Street. The paving was initially measured at 41×60 for the lot.

NEMO Open Livestock Show Schedule at 2017  Scotland County Fair

The Northeast MO Open Shows takes place Saturday, July 8, 2017 during the Scotland County Fair in Memphis, MO.

Following is the day’s agenda:

Pig Show: Check-in from 7:00-9:00 a.m.  Showtime is at 10:00 a.m.  The entry fee is $10.00 per head.  Purebred animals must show all breed characteristics.  The show includes Market and Breeding classes and is open to all ages.  Contact for the Pig Show is Chris Montgomery (660-342-7979).

Market Lambs and Breeding Goat Show:  Check-in from 10:00 a.m.-Noon.  Showtime is at 2:00 p.m.  The entry fee is $10.00 per head.  Market classes broke by weight and Breeding classes broke by age.  Health papers are required and the show is open to all ages.  Contact for the Market Lambs and Breeding Goat Show is Joanie Baker (660-216-4645).

Cattle Show: Check-in from 2:00-4:00 p.m.  Showtime is at 6:00 p.m.  The entry fee for an out of county exhibitor is $25 and for in county exhibitors the fee is $10 per head.  Heifers will be shown by breed and age.  Steers will be shown by weight.

Champion Steer – $350.00, Champion Heifer – $200.00, Reserve Champion Steer – $150.00, Reserve Champion Heifer – $100.00.  The Cattle Show is open to all ages and contact person is Curtis Mallett (660-341-6297).

Gorin Go-Getters 4-H Club Hosts June Meeting

by Sadie Davis

Vice President Morgan Blessing called the June meeting of the Gorin Go-Getters to order on June 11 at 2:00 p.m. at the Gorin Christian Church. Pledges were led by Dawson Crane & Tracy Huber. Secretary Lauren Triplett called roll by asking each member what their summer vacation plans were. Lauren also gave the minutes of the last meeting. Advisor Joanie Baker gave the Treasurer’s Report, announcing that the club had a current balance of $3,468.22. Council Representatives Kaitlyn Talbert and Shelby Troutman gave the Council Report.

The Financial Committee reported that working at the Boyer wedding resulted in donations from the Boyer family. Layla Baker reported that she had attended and enjoyed the Goat Camp.

Heidi Triplett announced that she had Club T-Shirts for members to buy. Joanie Baker asked that participants in the Super Farmer Contest tell her their t-shirt size. The club discussed the silent auction for the fair and Joanie informed the club that proceeds will go to the Salary account. Joanie passed around a sign-up sheet and asked members to sign up to work at the fair in either the Art Hall, Pepsi Wagon, or trash pick-up.

Joanie asked that members check their meeting attendance because they must have attended six meetings to show or sell at the fair. She also reminded members that SMQA requirements must be met to show or sell at the fair. Fair Clean-Up Day is June 24 and members must report by 10:00 a.m. to be counted for lunch. Wristbands for exhibitors are $15.00 at the Extension Office. NEMO Fair entries are due June 30 and you must have the leader’s signature. State Fair entries are due June 30 as well.

The next club meeting is July 3 at 5:30. Refreshments will be provided by the Jamie Triplett family and Jessica Huff will be giving a demonstration. The Azen Jolly Timers July meeting is on July 5 at 6:00 p.m. at the fairgrounds. July 8 are the Scotland County Open Livestock Shows. July 9-16 is the Scotland County Fair. The Gorin Go-Getters’ Art Hall slot is from 10:00-10:45 a.m.

After the meeting was adjourned, the club enjoyed popsicles provided by the Tara Huber family.

City Of Memphis Participates in Regional Cybersecurity Workshop

COLUMBIA, MO  –  The City of Memphis municipal utilities services participated in a regional Improving Cybersecurity Workshop and Cyber Mutual Assistance Orientation, held by the Missouri Public Utility Alliance (MPUA).

Memphis Utilities Superintendent Stacy Alexander attended the June 9 workshop in Columbia, among 42 representatives attending from 24 Alliance-member cities and utilities. The workshop was one of 14 regional cybersecurity workshops nationwide, sponsored by the American Public Power Association (APPA) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

“The workshop was filled with information about very real threats and concerns,” said Duncan Kincheloe, President and General Manager of the Missouri Public Utility Alliance. “Participants left with issues to consider for timely action in their local systems, or to discuss with other community leaders.”

Participants in the workshop joined in exercises and discussions to strengthen security of utility computer systems and critical infrastructure. Information was shared to help participants evaluate cyber threats and response measures, and discuss cyber resiliency and physical solutions, including advanced controls.

The second part of the workshop was an orientation to a Cyber Mutual Assistance program created by Homeland Security’s Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC). Mutual assistance, used by utilities to recover more quickly from natural disasters, can also be used to address cyber threats for utilities of all sizes.

The city is considering joining MPUA’s member municipal utilities participating in MPUA’s Cybersecurity Initiative. Overseen by N-Dimension Solutions, the service would provide continuous monitoring for intrusion detection and alerts, and security management to help identify areas of concern. The program also provides guidance to reduce vulnerabilities, and action steps to shut down threats and reduce damage in the event of a threat event.

The Missouri Public Utility Alliance is a multi-state association of more than 110 city-owned electric, water, gas, wastewater, and broadband utilities in Missouri, Illinois, Arkansas, and Kansas. MPUA provides support to its members in the areas of electric and natural gas supply, water and wastewater compliance, mutual aid disaster assistance, financing, safety training, and utility operations. MPUA also advocates on behalf of municipalities on utility issues at the national and state levels.

Grant Funding Helping to Enhance Memphis Recycling Program

Another round of grant funding from the Northeast Missouri Solid Waste Management District is helping enhance the City of Memphis’s recycling program. Earlier this month the city council approved a contract with Memphis Lumber for the construction of a new 20×28 post frame building and a 18×53 lean-to to be added to the existing recycling facility, located at the intersections of Hamilton, Monroe and Strong streets on the southwest edge of Memphis.

Once the new building is completed it will house the municipal recycling collection center, which has temporarily been located in the old state shed at the intersections of Highway 15 and 136.

The project cost is $12,790. The city will install cement flooring as part of the matching fund requirements of the grant.

The solid waste management district funding, which is made possible through landfill fees, also allowed the city to upgrade the systems baler, a a price tag of just shy of $25,000.

City Superintendent Roy Monroe said the improvements will help make the program much more efficient. The baler upgrade features a higher capacity hopper  which will make the process much less time consuming. The lean-to will add additional storage space for the recycled items, which offer a higher price when shipped in larger volume, while also helping lower transportation costs.

Monroe added that the new drop off point should be more user friendly as well while also being located at the recycling center, further reducing collection times for the city employees as well as transportation costs.

Work is expected to begin this week to install the floor at the lean-to that was constructed last week. The new collection building has not been completed yet. Monroe stated that once it is done, the floor is installed and the collection bins are installed, the city will close down the former collection site and notify the public of the changeover.

Annual Woods Reunion Held Sunday June 18th

With fifty-seven family members and friends gathered at the Grand Hall in Memphis, Sunday, June 18th for the Woods family reunion.  Fried chicken was furnished for all attending, as was a beautiful layered cake honoring all fathers there – it was also Father’s Day – and others brought salads, desserts, and veggies.  Lucille Woods Cossel asked the blessing prior to eating.

Randy and Charles Woods were in charge of reunion arrangements, with many pitching in to help.  Bonnie Woods Schultz gave a number of “mug rugs” to adults and to the children she had magnetic gifts.

An added area of interest was the display of family fact sheets and pictures display.  Randy and Bonnie were mostly responsible for these displays.  More pictures are desired for next year’s reunion.

Alison Woods Widmer from Aurora, CO, came farthest and Avery Rimer from Edina, MO was the youngest attending.  Ivan and Virginia Woods claim the honor of being the oldest!

Attendees were Alison Widmer Aurora, CO; Andrea Krog, Clarence; Johnny Morrison, Alexandria; Nancy and Joe Plowman, Cassie Plowman, Scott Shively, Bloomfield, IA; Darla and Leon Steenblock, and Darrel Cossel, Des Moines, IA; Dianna Rempp, Lucille Cossel, Tessa Islander, Ali Jo Islander, Reasnor, IA; Golda Seybold, Vicki Shear, Don McClean; Alicia, Will, and Adrian Gore, Quincy, IL; Hollis Woods, Keokuk, IA; Junior Woods, Ottumwa, IA; Sean and Clarinda Woods, Lone Jack, MS; Dale and Christine Heaton, Richard and Samantha Heaton, Unionville, MO; Bonnie Schultz, Kirksville; Lowell and Darlene Woods, Baring, MO; Dean Woods, Melvin Lee, Sarah, Jaxon, and Avery Rimer, Edina; Jennifer Woods, Downing; Jim and Kim Woods, Arbela; Jon, Sam, and Shannon Rader; P.T. and Diana Woods, Novinger; Chas. Woods, Jannet Graham, Ivan and Virginia Woods, Kevin, Debbie, Matthew Woods, Buzz, Faith Ann, Merit, and Halle Miller, Pam Mallett, Randy Woods, Karen Shippen, all from Memphis.

Submitted by Virginia Woods

Wright Graduates from MSU

SPRINGFIELD – Missouri State University conferred 2,651 degrees to students at its 2017 spring commencement May 19 at JQH Arena.

A total of 1,995 bachelor’s degrees, 554 master’s degrees, 93 doctorate degrees and nine specialist degrees were conferred.

Shaye Wright of Memphis, Missouri, graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology.

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