March 22, 2007

Local Health Care Providers Preparing for Possibility of Pandemic Influenza Outbreak

Every winter, area health care providers deal with flare ups of the flu and other sicknesses. But these annual battles pale in comparison to the possibility of a pandemic outbreak of influenza.

The possibility of such a disaster has led national and state officials to require the implementation of local plans for dealing with such an outbreak.

Scotland County health officials have taken the first steps in generating such a game plan.

Representatives from a variety of local health care providers met March 14th in Memphis to further address the project.

The meeting began when planner Ron Stewart introduced a Power Point presentation covering the four identified gaps contained within the Pandemic Influenza Plan for Scotland County.

Stewart outlined how critical preparedness for all hazards is an ongoing continuous process and requires the community to stand together to identify the key stakeholders, enable the community and the importance of coordinating local resources.

Stewart also provided an overview of Phase II requirements expected of the Scotland County Health Department and the importance of community support.

A general discussion of Community Critical Infrastructure (with handouts distributed), Non-Pharmacological measures, and Antiviral/Vaccine distribution to those identified community priority groups.

Following Stewarts presentation, a short overview of the Mass Care vision was presented by Gail McCurdy. This vision could vary in most communities but a combination of home care, clinic care, mass sick care, and sheltering was the concept that was most common.

The ensuing presentation detailed the points for potential methods to provide successful mass sick care. These keys included that the community stakeholders holding discussions on where services will be provided and how well in advance of an event the community can be prepared. Other keys were knowledge of the location of resources like manpower and equipment/supplies. The last key for success included the potential trigger mechanism(s) and who should be notified at the time of the trigger.

The discussion, facilitated by McCurdy, included naming possible mass sick care sites in the community. With the limitations and capabilities of each site reviewed, the list included the First Baptist Church, Rec-Plex, hotels and the nursing home. The school was discussed but was ruled out.

Scotland County Memorial Hospital (SCMH) CEO Marcia Dial explained that the hospitals surge capacity plan included movement of non-infectious patients from their care to the attached nursing home that could accommodate up to an additional 30 patients.

Dial approximated that the hospital could handle approximately 40 total patients including four with short-term ventilators at normal levels. The discussion revealed that mass sick care would not be the same level of care as expected or provided in an acute care hospital (the sites would only provide alternate home care).

Jose Padilla, SCMH EMS Supervisor, explained that the plan included sites for mass care for sick and sheltering. He expects to be meeting soon with local stakeholders to review the plan with these persons. Padilla also felt that manpower resources were defined in the plan.

Discussion then turned to persons currently with chronic health care needs that may not have anyone to provide care during such an emergency. A pandemic could divert current health care providers from these patients and might require these providers to stay at community shelter sites.

Margaret Curry, Administrator of Scotland County Health Department, felt that this area could be handled by her agency if necessary. Clients would still be encouraged to remain in their homes as long as they could be supported by the health department, but if it became unmanageable due to the nature of their care, the client would be triaged to a site outside of their home. These sites were not specifically named in this discussion.

Triggers for determining when a site for mass care of the ill should be opened was not discussed as a specific criteria.

Criteria could include:

* Regional and local medical care facilities were all unavailable for accepting sick patients and uncertain when they would become available.

* Escalation and anticipation in the next 12-24 hours of losing the above medical resources.

* Rapid escalation and increase in the volume of sick/medically needy occurs as to overwhelm the transfer/transport capabilities available either temporarily or for an uncertain length of time

Notification of persons for the decision-making and implementation of Mass Sick Care was discussed in general terms but specifics of notification were not elaborated.

Discussion also took place on the prioritization of vaccine and antivirals for the community. The current information from CIDRAP includes that the US Federal Pandemic Flu plan, HHS, hopes to have a large enough stockpile of antivirals to treat approximately 25% of the US population, the numbers for the locals was guided to be in this range. While a prioritization of persons who need to maintain critical infrastructure for health care and business should guide the decision of who those persons should be, it was suggested that the epidemiology of the disease at the time of its presentation should also be a factor. The prioritization table decided at this time will need to be revisited by the local authorities at the time of presentation of disease. Margaret Curry will pursue the prior information locally.

A question and answer period after the meeting allowed additional discussion revealing that concerns related to mass medical care, sheltering and other Gaps still needed clarification and dialogue.

These concerns included the issues of non-pharmacologic containment measures like special needs populations (Mennonites), school closings, child-care, quarantine and the authority for these actions with their impact and timing.

Since the community members felt they needed additional planning and discussion locally, it was decided that the group needed to become more familiar with the information from the hospital plan.

Padilla will facilitate this action to allow the local personnel to define which gaps still needed to be addressed. He suggested meeting with some of the stakeholders before another community meeting was held.

In the meantime, Curry will pursue acquiring information from local personnel the numbers and titles of those who would be prioritized for antivirals and vaccine.

Traffic Changes Implemented at Two Memphis Intersections

A new stop sign has been installed at the intersection of Market and North Streets in Memphis. the change was approved recently by the Memphis City Council to address visibility concerns at the intersection caused by parked vehicles.

The council approved installing a stop sign for traffic northbound on Market Street. Traffic at the intersection was already stopped by signs on North Street for both east- and westbound traffic.

The move turns the intersection into a three-way stop. Southbound traffic will not be required to stop. The council decided not to make it a four-way stop because of the steep incline heading into the southbound intersection on Market Street, which could be a factor in inclement weather.

The council also agreed to install a yield sign on County Road 555 at the northeast corner of Memphis where the gravel road comes onto Sigler Avenue near Scotland County Hospital. The intersection technically is county property, but the county does not install or maintain traffic signs.

The yield sign will impact southbound traffic on the gravel rood and will not impact traffic on Sigler Street.

Missouri DAR to Host Wheeling for Healing in September

Missouri DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) is sponsoring Wheeling for Healing, a fundraising bike ride across the historic Katy and Rock Island Trail, on Saturday, September 30, 2017 from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.  Proceeds from this ride will be divided between the Wounded Warrior Project and DAR’s Project Patriot.

The WWP mission is to honor and empower Wounded Warriors who incurred a physical or mental injury, illnesses, or wound, co-incident to their military service on or after September 11, 2001.  WWP also supports family members and caregivers of a Wounded Warrior.

DAR’s Project Patriot supports the Chaplain’s Closet at Landstuhl Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany; the Warrior Transition Brigade at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland and the Wounded Warrior and Family Support Center in San Antonio, Texas.  In addition, Project Patriot provides support to deploying and returning service members and their families.

The bike ride will take place across the historic Katy and Rock Island Trail. DAR chapters from all across the state are sponsoring SAG (Support And Gear) stations along the trail. Participants can enter and exit at any point along the Katy Trail and the Rock Island Spur.  The Jauflione Chapter of NSDAR, our local chapter, will be set up at the Hartsburg SAG. All registered riders will receive a T-shirt and swag bag.

Bicycling registration is due June 1st.  However, anyone is welcome to join riders along the trail, and any donation is greatly appreciated and can be dropped off at any SAG location.  For those wishing to register for the event, the Adult Rider fee is $30 and includes a t-shirt and SWAG bag.  The Child Rider (16 and under) fee is $15 and includes a t-shirt.  Jerseys can be purchased for $55 and additional t-shirts can also be purchased for $15.

Susan Miller is the coordinator for the Hartsburg SAG stop being sponsored by our local DAR chapter.  For more information about this event, whether to register as a rider, make a donation, or become a corporate sponsor, please contact Susan at: RR1 Box 130, Memphis, MO 63555 or call her at 660-945-3757.

Junior High Track Squads Close Out Season at Conference Meet

Teammates Kaden Anders and Alex Long battle it out down the stretch in the conference finals of the 200 meter dash. (Photo by Dr. Stephen Terrill)

The Scotland County junior high track teams closed out the 2017 season at the Lewis & Clark Conference on May 9th at Central Methodist University in Fayette.

The Tigers finished third in their inaugural season in the new league while the Lady Tigers were sixth out of nine schools.

Paris won the boys title with 124 points followed by Knox County with 94. SCR-I amassed 86 points to edge Clark County with 81.25 points. Westran was fifth followed by Harrisburg, Marceline, Schuyler County and Salisbury.

Marceline won the girls crown with 159 points. Salisbury (109) was second, followed by Paris (77.33), Harrisburg (75)  and Clark County (45). SCR-I earned 42.33 points to edge Schuyler County (41.33), Westran (15) and Knox County (12).

Kaden Anders led the Tigers with a first place finish in the long jump with a distance of 19′ 6.5″. Alex Long was third with a distance of 18′ 7″.

Anders also took top honors in the 400 meter dash and was third in the high jump and third in the 200 meter dash.

Alex Long finished fifth in the 200 meter dash. He took fourth in the 100 meter dash with brother Hayden Long in fifth. Alex was third in the 100 meter hurdles while Hayden took seventh.

Hayden Long earned third in the 1,600 meter run while Brady Curry was seventh.

Austin Holtke finished third in the shot put.

The 4×400 relay team of Kale Creek, Carson Harrison, Kade Richmond and Holtke finished fifth. They also teamed up for a seventh place finish in the 4×200 relay.

The 4×100 team of Jared Cerroni, Hunter Cook, Kabe Hamlin and Magnum Talbert finished eighth.

Hailey Kraus led the Lady Tigers with a third place finish in the high jump. She took seventh in the 400 meter dash.

Hannah Feeney finished third in the 800 meter run and was seventh in the triple jump.

Aayla Humphrey finished sixth in the 200 meter dash and was eighth in the 100 meter dash.

Shantel Small finished seventh in the 1,600 meter run and eighth in the 200 meter dash.

Haylee McMinn was sixth in the shot put and Emily Dial took eighth in the long jump.

The 4×400 relay team of Morgan Blessing, Jenna Blessing, Emily Terrill  and Kraus finished fourth.

The 4×100 relay team of Bobbi Darcy, Kiley Bradley-Robinson, Jenna Blessing and Morgan Blessing, also took fourth place. The same team took fifth in the 4×200 relay.

Spring Turkey Hunters Harvest 43,339 Birds

Preliminary data from the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) shows that turkey hunters checked 39,239 birds during Missouri’s 2017 regular spring turkey season April 17 through May 7. Top harvest counties were Franklin with 932 birds checked, Texas with 843, and Callaway with 697. Young turkey hunters harvested 4,100 birds during the 2017 spring youth season, April 8-9, bringing the overall 2017 spring turkey harvest to 43,339.

Scotland County hunters checked in 274 adult gobblers, 35 jakes and five bearded hens for a harvest total of 314. Schuyler County hunters bagged 215 birds while Knox County checked in 271 turkeys and Clark County hunters harvested 318 turkeys.

The 2016 overall spring turkey harvest was 48,374 birds with 4,167 harvested during the youth weekend and 44,207 during the regular spring season.

“Given that we haven’t had good hatches the past couple years, and the less-than-ideal weather during a considerable portion of this year’s season, the drop in harvest compared to last year was not unexpected,” MDC Turkey Biologist Jason Isabelle said.

He added that the number of birds harvested this spring wasn’t too far behind last year’s harvest total going into the second weekend of spring turkey season, but the heavy rains that blanketed much of the state shortly thereafter caused the harvest to drop rapidly.

Isabelle noted favorable weather over this past weekend helped harvest numbers bounce back a bit.

The 2017 spring turkey season included two non-fatal hunting incidents. One involved a shooter who mistook another hunter for a turkey and the other was a self-inflicted shooting injury.

Missouri offers some of the best turkey hunting in the nation. MDC restoration efforts in past decades have taken this popular game bird from almost being wiped out in the state by the 1950s to an estimated sustainable population of more than 300,000 birds today. Missouri turkey hunters spend more than $125 million each year on related travel, food, lodging, and hunting equipment, which helps local businesses and the economy.

Tigers Mash Milan 14-0 to Advance to District Championship Game

Aaron Buford tossed two shutout innings as the Tigers blanked Milan 14-0 in the Class District 5 semifinals on Monday in Memphis.

A pair of nice defensive plays early on by the Milan outfielders kept Scotland County off the scoreboard early in Monday’s Class 2 District 5 semifinals in Memphis. But the Tigers’ offense proved too potent to keep down for long, as SCR-I put up seven runs in back-to-back innings to defeat the Wildcats 14-0.

Aaron Buford got off to a rough start, walking the leadoff hitter before surrendering a single. He recovered nicely, striking out the next six batters he faced.

Milan got out of a bases loaded jam when Wyatt Boyle robbed Justin McKee of a hit with a diving catch in center field.

Jesus Gonzalez made a similar play in right field in the bottom of the second inning to steal a base hit from Will Pickerell after Elijah Cooley opened the frame with a bunt single. After Buford was hit by a pitch, Cooley advanced to third on a wild pitch and scored on a throwing error by the catcher. Gage Dodge singled home Buford to make the score 2-0. With two outs, Grant Campbell walked and Will Fromm plated both runs with a base hit. He scored on a double by Lane Pence. McKee followed with an RBI single. After a base hit by Cooley, Aaron Blessing walked to load the bases. A base on balls to Pickerell plated McKee to extend the lead to 7-0.

That was more than enough cushion to give Buford the hook after just 36 pitches, allowing him to be used in Wednesday night’s title game.

The Tigers limited the workload on the rest of the staff as well, adding another seven-spot in the bottom of the third to insure the game would end early by the 10-run rule.

McKee, Campbell and Blessing had RBI doubles in the frame.

Grant Campbell held Milan hitless over the next 2 2/3 innings in relief for SCR-I. Gage Dodge got the final out to nail down the 14-0 victory as SCR-I improved to 19-1 on the season.

Buford notched the win, allowing a hit and a walk in two innings of work while striking out six. Campbell fanned five batters and walked one.

Fromm went 3-4 with three RBIs. Cooley was 3-3 with two runs scored and McKee went 2-3 with two RBIs.

Dollar General Literacy Foundation Awards Nearly $170,000 to Missouri Schools, Nonprofits and Literacy Organizations

The Dollar General Literacy Foundation announced the award of more than $170,000 in literacy grants to Missouri nonprofit organizations, libraries and schools this morning. These funds are aimed at supporting adult, family and summer literacy programs within a 20-mile radius of a Dollar General store or distribution center across the 44 states Dollar General serves, and plan to positively impact the lives of nearly 15,000 Missourians.

“Dollar General is excited to provide these organizations with funding to support literacy and education throughout the 44 states we serve,” said Todd Vasos, Dollar General’s CEO.  “Providing these grants and supporting the communities we call home reflects our mission of Serving Others and it’s rewarding to see the impact these funds have.”

Northeast Missouri Caring Communities, Inc. of Edina received a $12,000 grant.

Statewide grants are part of more than $7.5 million that the Dollar General Literacy Foundation awarded this morning. Recipients of today’s grant announcements plan to use Dollar General Literacy Foundation funds to help adults learn to read, prepare for the high school equivalency exam, promote childhood summer reading or learn English. Missouri recipients are listed below and a comprehensive list of grant recipients may be found online at www.dgliteracy.org.

The Dollar General Literacy Foundation is also currently accepting applications for youth literacy grants through Thursday, May 18, 2017. Youth literacy grants support schools, public libraries and nonprofit organizations in implementing new or expanding existing literacy efforts. Funding can be used to purchase new technology, equipment, books, materials or software to enhance literacy programs. Applications are available online at www.dgliteracy.org.

For additional information, photographs or items to supplement a story, please visit the Dollar General Newsroom or contact the Media Relations Department at 1-877-944-DGPR (3477) or via email at dgpr@dg.com.

Anna Monroe Named to  Graceland University 2017 Honors List

LAMONI, IA (05/16/2017)– The honor roll lists for Graceland University’s 2017 spring term have been announced, and Anna Monroe of Memphis, MO, has been named to the Honors List.

Graceland University students with a GPA between 3.65 and 3.99 are named to the honors list. Congratulations, Anna! Graceland commends you on your academic success.

For more information visit www.graceland.edu and find Graceland University on Facebook and Twitter to follow additional student achievements.

Founded in 1895 and sponsored by Community of Christ, Graceland University in Lamoni, Iowa, is more than just a school. It is a community of passionate, caring and dedicated individuals who put their relationships with students first. Campuses are located in Lamoni, Iowa, and Independence, Missouri. For more information and to see additional student achievements, follow @gracelandu on Twitter and like Graceland University on Facebook, or visit www.graceland.edu.

Cemetery Revitalization

I want to publicly applaud the efforts of Elaine Smith, Ronnie Tinkle, Jeff Smith, and the generous donor(s) who made the revitalization of the Bethel Cemetery possible! On behalf of all the Rodgers, Barr and Overfield descendants, we are so grateful for your hard work!

Seeing Bethel the last time I was in Scotland County was heartbreaking and I wanted so badly to find a way to get it cleaned up. Elaine, Ronnie, Jeff, and the donor(s) were an answer to prayer. God Bless you!

Bruce Rodgers

Rochester, MN

SCR-I School Menus

Breakfast

Thursday, May 18 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Friday, May 19 – Last Day of School! Cook’s Surprise.

Lunch

Thursday, May 18 – Cook’s Surprise.

Friday, May 19 – Last Day of School! Sack Lunch.  Have a Great Summer!

SCR-I Summer School Menus

(Summer School runs from May 22-June 9.  All meals are free of charge to children 18 and under.  Children do not have to be enrolled to eat and walk-ins are welcome.)

Breakfast

Monday, May 22 – Pancakes, Sausage Link, Fresh Fruit, Juice/Milk

Tuesday, May 23 – Last Cinnamon Rolls, Fresh Fruit, Juice/Milk

Wednesday, May 24 – Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Fresh Fruit, Juice/Milk.

Thursday, May 25 – Breakfast Burrito, Fresh Fruit, Juice/Milk.

Lunch

Monday, May 22 – Hot Dog/Bun, Macaroni and Cheese, Peas, Chocolate Pudding, Mandarin Orange Slices

Tuesday, May 23 – Chicken Wrap, Potato Rounds, Buttered Corn, Sliced Pears

Wednesday, May 24 – Cheese Pizza, Green Beans, Applesauce

Thursday, May 25 – Hamburger/Bun, Oven Ready Fries, Tomato Slices and Pickles, Sliced Peaches

Scotland County Senior Nutrition Center

MENU

Thursday, May 18 – Tenderloin/Bun, Onions, French Fries, Pea Salad, Pineapple, Brownies

Friday, May 19 – Roast Beef, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Green Beans, Carrot-Pineapple Cake

Monday, May 22 – Sausage Biscuits/Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, Buttered Carrots, Applesauce, Cookie

Tuesday, May 23 – Lasagna/Meat Sauce, Lettuce Salad, Hominy, Garlic Bread, Peaches

Wednesday, May 24 – Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Green Beans, Hot Roll, Fruit Salad

Thursday, May 25 – Roast Pork, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Sauerkraut, Cranberry Sauce, Slice Bread, Pudding

ACTIVITIES

Thursday, May 11 – Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Wednesday, May 17 – Board and Business Meeting at 1:00 p.m.

Thursday, May 18 – Health Department here for blood pressure checks, Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Thursday, May 25 – Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

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