September 9, 2004

NEMO Boys Earn Bronze At Show-Me Games

The United States mens basketball took bronze in this summers Olympics and so to did the NEMO Boys basketball team at the states Olympics, the Show-Me State Games.

This eight-man team was assembled from six incoming freshmen and two incoming eighth graders to compete in the 2004 Missouri State Show-Me-Games 14-and-under age division.

With only five practices together before the games they played very well considering most teams, which they faced play together year round, said Coach Bob Courtright. The boys each received a Bronze Medal for their 3rd place finish out of a 14-team field, which tells me that there are some very talented young players to watch in the upcoming basketball seasons in the Tri-Rivers conference.

The local squad swept through the opening round of the tournament winning four straight games before falling to a team from St. Louis in the semi-finals.

The NEMO Boys opened the event against St. Charles Red Raiders on Friday, July 23rd. The team had a very balanced scoring attack, with all eight players getting in the scorebook.

NEMO led 14-6 after the first quarter and increased their lead to 31-14 by halftime. By the end of the 3rd quarter NEMO led 45-25 and cruised through the final period to pull away and win 59-30.

They were led in scoring by Scott McAfee with 12 points, followed closely by Jacob Winkler with 11 and Cody Musgrove with 10. Javis Vineyard added 8 points. Torey Weston put up 7 points, Colt Sommers added 6 points, Corey Shultz hit a 3-pointer and Brett Courtright added 2 points to round out the scoring.

The team took to the court on Saturday morning to do battle with Harrisonville

This is the game most of these boys will remember for a long time as this game was played on the main floor of the Hearnes Center where the Missouri Tigers played their home games, Courtright said. It was an experience that I dont think they will forget for a while.

The surroundings didnt seem to bother the boys much as they jumped out to a 17-5 lead at the end of the first quarter with six of the eight players scoring. They went on to win the game 55-19.

The NEMO Boys were led in scoring by Musgrove with 13 points and Winkler with 12 points.

Just four hours later the team was back at play taking on the Hollister Dawgs.

This was a very important game to win as both teams came into the game undefeated within the division and the winner would get a bye into the single elimination tournament and wouldnt have to play until Sunday morning, Courtright said.

The game started off back and forth as both teams shot the ball extremely well.

The second quarter saw the NEMO Boys take control of the boards and Musgrove scored 11 of his game-high 20 points in this quarter to lead the NEMO Boys to a 31-22 halftime lead. The NEMO Boys won the game 60-38 to advance to the first round of the single elimination tournament by winning their division. Musgrove led the team in scoring with 20 points, followed closely by Sommers with 18.

West Plains was the next victim of the NEMO squad as the local team dispatched the opposition early Sunday morning.

The quarter-final game didnt get off to a good start for the NEMO Boys as poor shooting hampered them throughout the game.

Sommers was the lone bright spot offensively early in the game as he scored 8 of his 20 points in the opening quarter to give the NEMO Boys a 13-12 lead.

The shooting woes continued in the 2nd quarter but they still managed to play good enough defense to take a slim 2-point advantage of 31-29 at halftime.

The NEMO Boys opened up the game in the 3rd quarter as their defense set the tone by forcing several West Plains turnovers, which in turn led to several fast break lay-ups. By the end of the 3rd quarter the NEMO Boys led 49-37 and never looked back the rest of the way outscoring West Plains 13-12 in the 4th quarter to take the win 62-49 and advance to the semi-final round later that day.

Sommers led the team in scoring with 20 points. McAfee added 10 points Winkler had 9 and Musgrove had 7.

The teams tournament run end Sunday afternoon against the St. Louis Ballers.

This game got off to a terrible start for the NEMO Boys as they committed four consecutive turnovers to start the game and this led to four fast break lay-ups for the Ballers and kind of set the tone for most of the first quarter, Coach Courtright said.

It was midway through the 1st quarter before the NEMO Boys finally got on the scoreboard with a jumper from Vineyard but trailed 16-2 at the time.

The NEMO Boys opened the 2nd quarter with Weston hitting a 3-pointer and came back out strong outscoring the Ballers 13-6 in the quarter to cut the lead to single digits at 21-30 by half time.

The 3rd quarter saw the Ballers extend their lead back up to 10 points by outscoring the NEMO Boys 14-13 and taking a 44-34 lead at the end of the quarter. The 4th quarter was much the same as the 3rd as the two teams traded baskets throughout the period and the NEMO Boys were outscored by 2 points this quarter and were eliminated from the tournament by a disappointing final score of 59-47.

Sommers finished the game with 13 points. Winkler had 10 points, and Musgrove added 9 points.

After we finally broke the ice and got on the board the boys settled down a bit and played pretty well, Courtright said. We started this game a bit intimidated I think, as the Ballers are a 4A school team from St. Louis which plays in a youth league year round and are extremely tall and quick, but once the boys calmed down and started to play with some confidence they did fine. We just dug ourselves into too big of a hole early and couldnt get back out. I was very proud of the fact that the boys didnt quit when we were down 16 to start the game and ended up only losing by 12, so we played this team better than even for 3 and quarters. It was just that first 5 minutes of the game that killed us.

Putnam County Stops SCR-I 3-2 in Softball Season Opener

Katie Feeney’s head-first slide into home just beats the tag as she scored on a wild pitch in the third inning to knot the score at 2-2.

Ashleigh Creek smashed the first strike she saw in her senior season for a solo home run on Monday night in Memphis, but it was not enough as Scotland County fell to Putnam County 3-2 in the 2017 season debut for the Lady Tigers.

The Lady Midgets jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the top of the first with a couple of base hits.

But Creek trimmed the deficit to 2-1 when she led off in the bottom of the second inning, crushing a line drive over the left field fence to make the score 2-1. Khloe Hamlin and Abby Blessing followed with base hits to give SCR-I a chance at a big inning, but both runners were stranded.

SCR-I erased a lead off error in the third when catcher Katie Feeney gunned down a would-be base stealer at second with a nice catch and tag by shortstop Khloe Hamlin.

The momentum carried over to the bottom of the third when Feeney led off with a base hit. She stole second base and moved into scoring position on a ground out by Kaitlyn McMinn. The sophomore then sprinted home and her head-first slide just avoided the tag on a wild pitch to knot the score at 2-2.

But Putnam County pulled ahead for good in the top of the fourth inning. A pair of singles and a hit by pitch loaded the bases with two outs when a blooper fell in behind the mound and everyone was safe to make the score 3-2.

Creek worked out of a jam in the seventh, stranding a pair of runners.

Unfortunately, SCR-I managed just one base runner over the final four innings, a two-out single by Creek in the sixth, as Putnam County held on for the 3-2 win.

Creek took the loss on the mound, allowing three runs, two earned, on six hits and a hit by pitch. She struck out eight in seven innings of work.

Sammi Bradshaw limited SCR-I to two runs on five hits while striking out five.

Creek went 2-3 with a home run, an RBI and a run scored. Feeney, Hamlin and Blessing recorded the other hits, all going 1-3.

MARY LOUISE BROWN (10/30/1918 – 8/17/2017)

Mary Louise Brown, 98, died Thursday, August 17, 2017, at her home in Carbondale, IL surrounded by loving family.

She was born October 30, 1918, in Kirksville, MO, to George E. and Nannie Moore Leslie. She grew up in Memphis, MO, where she attended public schools and was valedictorian of her high school class. Following graduation with a Bachelors Degree from Kirksville State College, she taught in high schools in Kirksville and Monticello, MO. She was married in 1940 to Clyde Moseley Brown. In 1951 they moved to Carbondale, IL where they raised their family. After his death in 1965, she worked in Academic Advisement at Southern Illinois University until her retirement in 1988.

Mary Lou was a devoted mother, survived by her children Nancy Cook (Greg) of Makanda, IL, Susie Ellison (Lee) of Portland, OR, Bill Brown of New Braunfels, TX, Rosemary Hopson (Jack) of St. Louis, MO, Laura Ventetuolo of Cranston, RI, and Charles Brown (Jeanne) of Beltsville, MD. She was grandmother of 11 and great-grandmother of 23 children. She is also survived by her sister Nancy Harris of Memphis, MO and many nieces and nephews. She will be missed by many longtime friends and neighbors and by her dedicated caregivers, Diana, Eva, Rachel and Pat.

Mary Lou was an active member of the First United Methodist Church of Carbondale for 66 years, and of Chapter GX, PEO Sisterhood. She volunteered in her children’s schools and scouts. Among her many interests were traveling with family, playing bridge, gardening and reading. She was an enthusiastic supporter of Saluki Basketball, attending all home games for many years.

Services for Mary Lou were held Wednesday, August 23, at First United Methodist Church, in Carbondale, IL with Rev. Alan Rhein officiating. Burial followed in Oakland Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory to First United Methodist Church, Hospice of Southern Illinois or a charity of the donor’s choice will be appreciated. Envelopes will be available at the church.

Meredith Funeral Home, Carbondale assisted the family with arrangements.

To share a story or memory of Mary Lou please visit, www.meredithfh.com.

Rutledge Ruby Red Hats Travel to Quincy

The Rutledge Rudy Red Hats carpooled to Quincy, IL on Monday August 14th. Some of the ladies met at the Zimmerman’s cafe to depart while others gathered in Colony for rides.

We had a great lunch at Kelly’s Tavern.

Those present were Julia Hunolt, Charlene Montgomery, Celina Erickson, Alice Ann Gipson, Jewel See, Marjorie Peterson, Virginia Hustead, Reva Hustead and Neta Phillips.

Everyone received a gift from their hostesses, Dorothy Hunolt and Naomi Kidd-Schwandt.

The next meeting will be at El Jays Restaurant (where the VFW used to be). Our hostesses next month will be Alice Ann Gibson and Marjorie Peterson.

Submitted by Naomi Kidd-Schwandt

Classified Ads

LICENSE PLATES WANTED – Collector paying $1000 or more for old license plate collections. 816-365-0447.

HELP WANTED – Personal care attendant in the Scotland County area to work for consumers with disabilities.  For more info contact the RAIL office in Kirksville at 1-888-295-6461.

FOR SALE – Purebred KuneKune pigs.  The perfect old-fashioned, lard pig.  Fattens on pasture alone, won’t root up your fields and is VERY friendly!  Two boars ($300 each) and one gilt ($500), born this spring. Each will be microchipped and registered with AKKPS.  Visit whisperinggrassesfarm.com for more information or call 660-945-3733.

Cedar Grove Club Meets in Greensburg

The Cedar Grove Club met on Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at the home of Betty Bissell.  We enjoyed an all salad meal of chicken salad, potato salad, macaroni salad, cucumber salad, sliced tomatoes, and a dessert salad.  Betty said the blessing.

Reta Stott was on vacation, so Vice-President Betty called the meeting to order.  Present were Betty Bissell, Peggy Cumby, Christine Musgrove, Virginia Woods, and Phyllis Heckethorn.  Christine brought special guest, Joy Musgrove.

Peggy is going to notify Betty and Christine of when she will next be in town.  They will meet at the Care Center to discuss the Community Project.

The September meeting will be on the 13th at the home of Reta Stott.

Submitted by Phyllis Heckethorn

Rutledge Renegades

Charlene Montgomery and Naomi Kidd-Schwandt went to Kirksville.

Katrina and Neta went to Kirksville.

Katrina and Neta went to LaBelle Harvest Festival on Saturday, August 19th.  Neta rode on the Eastern Star #316/Masonic Lodge #222 float in the parade.

There was an exercise class at the Memphis Pool on Tuesdays and Thursdays. We called ourselves the “Memphis Mermaids”.  Our lifeguard was Megan Kice and our instructors were Lorri Shirkey, Katie Kittle Tuck, Kendra Schlater, and Megan Weber.  Some of the “Mermaids” were Ethel Barrett, Benji Briggs, Kathe Droege and granddaughter, Kallee Kretzer, Karen Kelso, Julie Chamley, Marilyn Blessing, Dee Wiley, Terry Sommers, Nancy Jo Waack, and Neta Phillips.

Ruby Red Hats of Rutledge will be going to Ogo’s in Keokuk, IA on Monday, September 18, 2017 at 11:00 a.m.   We will be meeting at Zimmerman’s at 9:15 a.m.

Lena Mae Horning and Marion Huber had to get up very early to come to work at Zimmerman’s.  They made 25 dozen donuts!!

Some of those in this week were Tim Morris, Dale Tague, Don Tague, Neta Phillips, Bob and Dorothy Hunolt, Martin Guinn, Reva Hustead, Marjorie Peterson, Ronnie and Bonnie Young, Oren and Celina Erickson, Doris Day, Charlene Montgomery, Ruth Ludwick, Katrina Hustead, and Victor Childers.

Mark the Path

I’ve learned over the years, to keep a watchful eye when I travel to a tree stand in an unfamiliar place. I especially do this when I’m hunting in another state. I’ve been lost a few times. When I’m walking in, I always try to turn around and look back to see what the view looks like going in the opposite direction. I also mark certain topographical differences such as a fallen tree or one that has a certain shape or characteristic. I also take with me some marking ribbon just in case I have to wander through the woods in search for an animal I may have shot. I will mark my path back to my tree stand.

I’ve just hunted long enough to understand that no matter how experienced I may think I am, I can and will get turned around in a strange place. One of the simplest inventions that came along a few years ago was reflective tacks. They are pushed into a tree and when passed over with a flashlight will make a path look like an airport runway.  I’ve hunted in some places where these tacks were put on both sides of the path every few feet, all the way to the foot of the tree where I was to hunt. Because someone marked my path, there was no way I was getting lost.

When I think about the most important things in my life, I am equally thankful some folks marked a clear path to keep me from getting lost. And even though I chose to stray from that path many times, it was not because the path was not marked sufficiently.

Wisdom is knowing when to blaze your own trail and when to understand the trail that others have blazed is the only way to go. It is also making sure you have marked the correct trail for those who will come after you. There are some areas in life that those who follow us must find out for themselves; things like what their call is or what their passions are. There is no shortcut for these pursuits. In other areas we can save them a lot of heartaches if we will clearly mark the path and warn them concerning leaving its narrow way.

Even though I had some great guides in my life, I also know if others had also accepted their responsibility for pointing me the right way, I could have learned a lot of important lessons a lot earlier than I did. Don’t ever be afraid to mark the path when you are exactly sure where it leads.

Gary Miller

Outdoor Truths Ministries

www.outdoortruths.org

Battle of Brier Creek

The Battle of Brier Creek was an American Revolutionary War battle fought on March 3, 1779 near the confluence of Brier Creek with the Savannah River in eastern Georgia. A Patriot force consisting principally of militia from North Carolina and Georgia was surprised, suffering significant casualties. The battle occurred only a few weeks after a resounding American Patriot victory over the British at Kittle Creek, north of Augusta,  reversing its effect on morale. Following the entry of France into the Revolutionary War in 1778, the British focused their  attention on the American South, to which they had not paid great attention in the early years of  the war. The British Commander was Mark Prevost. The American Commander was  John Ashe. On the afternoon  of March 3, 1779 a rider galloped into the American camp warning of the British approach. While the exact time they had to deploy is uncertain, the relatively hurried nature of their deployment is clear. The number of troops that actually formed up was about  900, as a  number of troops had been dispatched to the south for scouting and  others were on duty elsewhere. Distribution of ammunition to the men  was complicated by  the shortage of cartouche boxes and varying musket  calibers, and most of the Patriot militia did not have bayonets. Seeing the British charging at them, many broke and ran without even firing a shot. The result was a British victory. The American Patriots had at least 150 men killed, unknown wounded and 227 captured.

From Jauflione Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution

MARTHA ANGELA “MARTY” COCHRAN (7/5/1954 – 8/19/2017)

Martha Angela “Marty” Cochran, 63, died Saturday, August 19, 2017. She was born July 5, 1954 in Kirksville, Missouri, the daughter of Wayne Stanley and Shirley Ann (Watson) Parker.

She was a 1972 graduate of Scotland County R-1 School, a member of First United Methodist Church, Hutchinson, Kansas and was owner of a title insurance company in Hutchinson, Kansas.

On December 21, 1972 she married Jimmy Dean Cochran in Memphis, Missouri. He survives. Also surviving, are their sons, Ryan and Carrie of Hutchinson, Kansas, and Zac and Kate of Wichita, Kansas; two grandsons, Fisher Austin and Bane Parker; sisters, Kathryn Eggers of Overland Park, Kansas, Rebecca Parker Childress of Edina, Missouri, Tamara Parker Nance of Tampa, Florida, Teresa Parker McDonald of Venice, Florida; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Marty was preceded in death by her parents and her parents-in-law, John and Edna Cochran.

Cremation has taken place. Memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Thursday, August 24, 2017 at Elliott Chapel with Reverend Jeff Slater presiding. Friends may sign her memorial book through service time Thursday, with family to be present from 1 to 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made to Hospice of Reno County, in care of Elliott Mortuary and Crematory, 1219 N. Main, Hutchinson, KS 67501.

Descendants of Original Pioneers Pay Visits to Scotland, Schuyler Counties

Henry Hawkins Downing, II descendants recently gathered to explore Scotland and Schuyler counties where their ancestor was one of the original pioneers settling in the region. Photo by Abby Fincher.

by Barbara Blessing

On August 14 and 15, 2017, descendants of pioneer settlers converged on northeast Missouri to view the origins of their predecessors. Henry Hawkins Downing I and his wife Airy Hitch Downing were joined by five of their seven children to make the 1,000 mile trek to Missouri in 1834. Included with the five journeying to Missouri was our ancestor Henry Hawkins Downing II.  The other four children were Harriet Green Smoot, Martha Acton Briggs, Amanda Melvina Williams, and William G. Downing.  A sister, Sarah Ann Downing Hudnall, with her family, soon joined the Missouri contingent.  The only one to remain in Virginia was son John Hitch Downing.  Together with their families, they made the trek from Virginia to settle on the frontier.  While they had no wealth when they left Faquier County, Virginia, through industry and hard work, they were soon landowners and prominent businessmen.

Henry H. Downing II had nine children: namely, John Alexander, Rhoda Ann, William Green, Mary Etta, Amanda D., Harriet (Hattie) Ann, Henry Hawkins III, James M, and Jennie Valiant.  The descendants of John Alexander, Rhoda Ann and Jennie Valiant were present for the reunion.  Those attending were Bill Cox, Rebekah Cox Fish, Jennie Downing Cox, Mel Cox, Abby Cox Fincher, and matriarch Melba Cox from the Jennie Valiant Nelson family.  Those attending from John Alexander’s family were Kathleen Downing de Izaguirre, Indiana Lugo Downing and Emma Lugo Downing, Maria Downing de Villa, Martha and Frank Fair, Pearl Gizzarelli, Vivian B. Najarra,  Sergio and Maria Zamora, and Maria Downing,   Those present from Rhoda’s family were Henry Hawkins Blessing and his wife Barbara, Marilyn Blessing and her husband Roy Blessing, Jr., Jim Bruner, Louise Newland, and  SC researcher Joanne Aylward who had helped Mr. and Mrs. Cox during a previous visit.  The descendants attending currently live in New Jersey, California, Kansas, Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Nicaragua, and Venezuela.

Bill Cox and his late wife Teresia have done extensive research on our family’s origins.  On Monday, he presented a notebook to everyone detailing some of the information they have gleaned from years of study.  We left the fellowship hall of the Downing Christian Church to go to the Downing Family Cemetery located on land owned now by Henry H. Blessing II, another descendant of Rhoda’s.  We visited at the recently renovated site and took pictures.  Then we journeyed to the James Garnett home to visit the place of the original homestead of Henry H. Downing II.  There have been years of change, but there remains the cistern and a depression in the ground where the cellar was originally and then filled in.  After lunch at Keith’s, we went to the Downing House Museum built by Henry’s brother, William G. Downing to view artifacts, history, and memorabilia from Scotland County.

The Downing House Museum hosted the group of Henry Hawkins Downing descendants during their visit to Memphis. Photo by Jennie Cox.

The Scotland County Genealogical Society presented us with folders of information from their files.  They also hosted a reception at their building and served refreshments in honor of Miss Indiana Lugo Downing’s 77th birthday.  We then went to view the square where Mr. John Alexander Downing, upon returning to America from Nicaragua, established a business.  His father Henry II had deeded him three lots with a house where they resided during their brief sojourn in America before returning to Nicaragua to finally establish their permanent home.

We went to the Scotland County Library where we viewed the resources that were available for genealogy study.

On Tuesday, we reconvened at the Fellowship Hall of the Downing Christian Church before going to the Downing Museum where we were hosted by volunteers Judy Sharp and Jerry Scurlock.  Several pictures were taken and visiting continued.  We then went to the Winn Hill Bed and Breakfast to view a typical 1850’s home where the brick were kilned on the property.  After a fantastic meal and more visiting and picture-taking, several had to depart to catch planes to return to their homes.  The Cox family went to the Dover Cemetery to view the resting places of Colonel John William and Rhoda Priest and their descendants and then to Henry and Barbara’s home to view the Middle Fabius grist stone, the site of the presumed Rhoda Downing Priest’s home, and other artifacts.

We are indebted to the Genealogical Society, Curators of the Downing House Museum, Rhonda McBee, Lynette Dyer, and Anna Lynn Kirkpatrick, the Childresses for opening their Winn Hill B&B home for touring and dining, Melissa Schuster of the SC Library (who is herself a Downing descendant), Mr. Garnett and Henry Blessing II for access to their land, The Downing Christian Church for use of their fellowship hall, and to Ronnie Tinkle for refurbishing the family cemetery.

“I am bound to them, though I cannot look into their eyes or hear their voices, I honor their history.  I cherish their lives.  I will tell their story.  I will remember them.”  Author Unknown

 

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