April 3, 2003

NEIL FOUNTAIN
(2/10/1950 - 3/29/2003)




Neil Fountain, 53, of Memphis and Williamstown died Saturday morning, March 29, 2003, at his home in Memphis.

He was born the son of Nolan and Pearl (Walker) Fountain of Colony, MO, on February 10, 1950 in Kirksville, MO.

On July 14, 1971, he married the former Donetta Jean Norton at Colony. She survives.

Neil attended grade school in Colony and graduated from Knox County High School. He served in the United States Army after high school. Neil was self-employed for many years as a mechanic, dozer and trencher operator, as well as being an over-the-road driver. Ill health forced his early retirement.

He was preceded in death by his parents, a half-brother, Delmar Fountain, and a half-sister, Dorothy Fountain.

He is survived by his wife, Donetta, of Memphis; two sons: Nolan Fountain and wife Torrie of LaPlata, MO, and Jason Fountain of the home; three grandchildren: Haily, Hollie, and Erik Fountain of LaPlata; a sister, Shirley and husband Glen Klocke of Edina; two brothers: Burbert Fountain of Rutledge, MO, and Herbert Fountain and wife Maggie of Colony; three half-brothers: Duane Fountain of Edina, MO, Don Fountain of Denver, CO, and Dale Fountain, of Pocatello, ID; numerous nieces, nephews, and great-nieces and great-nephews.

Funeral services were held on Tuesday, April 1, 2003 at 2:00 p.m. in the Gerth Funeral Chapel in Memphis with the Rev. Richard Van Bebber officiating. Serving as pallbearers were Rick Pinson, Donnie Small, Tim McDuffie, Danny Norton, Danny Walker, and Randy Norton, Jr. Honorary bearers were Randy Brown, John Shannon, Nolan Fountain, and Jason Fountain. Interment was in the Colony Cemetery in Colony, MO, with military graveside rites by the Wallace W. Gillespie Memorial Post #4958 of Memphis. Memorials are suggested to the American Heart Association or to the Family.

Gerth Funeral Service handled the arrangements from their Memphis chapel.

Condolences may be sent to the Fountain family via email at gerths@gerths.com.

SCR-I Elementary School Releases 4th Quarter Honor Roll

The Scotland County Elementary School recently released the fourth quarter honor roll for the 2015-2016 school year.

Named to the 3A A Honor Roll were: Luke Arnold, Owen Brown, Will Darland, Emma Gist, Owen Hassell, Kassidee Jack, Jaci Knupp, Payton Miller, Jackson Siegfried, Kylie Small, and Marcus Smith. Named to the B Honor Roll were Logan Buford, Reese Cook, Dylan Dawson, Aden Drummond, Megan Frederick, Brooklynn Fuller, Kwyn Hamlin, Sabrina Heimer, Chris McKinney, Mason Mallett, Hayden McClain, Kennedy Middleton, Caiden Nichols, Kendall Small, Serina Vickers, and Anissa Yerhardt.

Named to the 3B A Honor Roll were: Bristol Alexander, Casidey Altobelli, Hannah Campbell, Grayson Chance, Vince Dale, Sadie Dilliner, Taylor Egenberger, Isaac Exner, Kevin Henn, Holly Mauck, Merit Miller, Katelynn Penn, Brenna Phillips, Ben Scott, Destynee Small, Layne Stott, Makyla Swearingen, and Beau Triplett. Named to the B Honor Roll were: Austin Curry, Ariana Edwards, Kennya Goldenstein, Abby Jones, Larkyn Justice, Kayden Miller, Rylee Starbuck, and Renee Tinkle.

Named to 4A A Honor Roll were: Emma Anders, Hugh Baker, Corbin Blessing, Emma Harvey, Taydem Morton, Kennady Sapp, and Hailey Small. Named to B Honor Roll were: Alice Darland, Logan Day, Mazy Dodge, Tristen Fuller, Elias Hatfield, Dillon Hayzlett, Tyson Hillyer, Clarence Koser, Chloe Krise, Janail Miller, Carlee Smith, and Matison Tinkle.

Named to the 4B A Honor Roll were: Kendal Anderson, Brooke Campbell, Madigan Frederick, Payton Frederick, Jadin Fuller, Hunter Holt, Makynlee Jack, Carson Miller, Hattie Mumford, Emma Tinkle, and Fawntana Wells. Named to the B Honor Roll were: Chason Campbell, Kyndra Cochran, Kallen Hamlin, Kaylee Hobbs, Ryan Hollon, Lathan McAfee, Charlotte McRobert, Breyonna Mitchell, Tori Peterson, and Tanner Vallee.

Named the 5A Honor Roll were: Bryn Aylward, Ethan Blessing, Sidney Brandon, Penelope Cline, Lucas Durflinger, Ethan Herring, Elsie Kigar, Iris Mishra, Hunnter Sapp, Quinton Shaffer, Lauren Triplett, and Julian Valle. Named to the B Honor Roll were: Anne Anderson, Aden Aldridge, Jayden Burgess, Layne Egenberger, Aaron McDaniel, Riley Small, Nancy Voitik, and Ian Wilson.

Named to the 5B Honor Roll were: Hanna Anders, Kina Billings, Lydia Davis, Abby Doster, Karli Hamilton, Jewley Kraus, Jackson McKee, Eric Mohr, Caelin Robinson, Sean Schroeder, Elizabeth Sevier, Justin Swearingen, and Owen Triplett. Named to the B Honor Roll were: Danielle Bass, Paige Bishop, Grady Dodge, Phillip Esser, and Tresa Huber.

Named to the 6A A Honor Roll were: Jared Cerroni, Abby Curry, Emiley Dial, Hannah Feeney, Brant Frederick, Alex Long, Haylee McMinn, and Corbyn Spurgeon. Named to the B Honor Roll were: Trayton Buckallew, Rylea Camp, Hunter Cook, Kale Creek, Cameron Hake, Kabe Hamlin, Destiny Lamb, Will Montgomery, Baileigh Phillips, Tamara Vaughn, and Alaynna Whitaker.

Named to the 6B A Honor Roll were: Zach Behrens, Sorrel Frederick, Caitlyn Johnson, Eli Kigar, Corbin Kirchner, Hayden Long, Kara Mallett, and Emily Terrill. Named to the B Honor Roll were: Jess Girardin, Shire Gross, Taryn Hassell, Vikke Huber, Aayla Humphrey, Mary Kellum, Lydia Krouse, Zane See, Shantel Small, Rose Whitley, and Zach Young.

Local Students Make C-SC Honor Rolls

CANTON, MO – Culver-Stockton College announced its President’s List for the spring 2016 semester. To be named to the President’s List, students must meet high academic standards established by Culver-Stockton.

Katie Watson, a Psychology major from Brashear, and Megan Creek, a Biology major from Memphis, both earned the honors.

C-SC also announced its Dean’s List for the spring 2016 semester. To be named to the Dean’s List, students must meet high academic standards established by Culver-Stockton.

Named to the list were: Brittany Thompson, a  Psychology major from Lancaster; Dakota Peterson, an Accountancy major from Luray; Delaney Gundy, 2017 Art Education major from Gorin; and Shelby Thompson, an Accountancy major from Lancaster.

C-SC announced its Honor Roll for the spring 2016 semester. To be named to the Honor Roll, students must meet high academic standards established by Culver-Stockton.

Named to the honor roll were: Ashley Watson, an Art major from Brashear; Taylor Huffman, an Elementary Education major from Edina; and Wyatt Kice, an Art Education major from Memphis.

Culver-Stockton College, located in Canton, Mo., is a four-year residential institution in affiliation with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). C-SC specializes in experiential education and is one of only two colleges in the nation to offer the 12/3 semester calendar, where the typical 15 week semester is divided into two terms, a 12-week term and a 3-week term.

The C-SC Wildcats are members of the Heart of America Athletic Conference (HAAC) and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA).

Smith-Roberts Graduates

loren smith web

Loren Smith-Roberts graduated from Truman State University on Saturday, May 7, 2016 with a Master’s degree in Elementary Education.  Spring Commencement ceremonies were held at Stokes Stadium on the Truman campus at 2:00 p.m.  Unfortunately, due to an afternoon rain, the ceremony only lasted about half an hour and in order to speed the process, the 1000 Truman State University students who were supposed to walk across the stage, were asked to stand up in their different fields to be recognized.  While at Truman State, Loren was a member of Delta Zeta social sorority, Kappa Delta Pi education honors fraternity, Order of Omega, and National Education Association.  She is a 2012 graduate of Scotland County R-1 and the daughter of Chuck and Audrey Roberts of Memphis and Terry Smith, Jr. of Granger.  She has accepted a teaching position at Grange Middle School in Fairfield, California where she will be teaching 6th grade.

Duley, Hunolt Graduate From NMSU

The Office of the Registrar and the Graduate School at Northwest Missouri State University have released the names of students who completed requirements for degrees at the conclusion of the 2016 spring trimester.

Andrew Michael Hunolt of Baring graduated  Cum Laude (cumulative GPA of 3.50 to 3.74) with a Bachelor of Science degrees in Business Management and Marketing.

Anna Appaline Duley of Memphis graduated Magna Cum Laude (cumulative GPA of 3.75 to 3.94) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Recreation: Corp Rec/Wellness.

Duzan Graduates

duzan web

Elizabeth Grace McNeil Duzan, along with more than 200 other college graduates, walked across the stage to receive her degree at Mabee Sports Complex, Hannibal LaGrange University in Hannibal, MO, on Saturday, May 7th at 10:00 a.m.  Prior to the ceremony, the graduates processed through the HLGU arch on the University’s traditional Walk of Honor, symbolizing the end of their schooling and their entrance into the world as college graduates.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor of Science in Media Communication with a General Business Minor.  She graduated Summa Cum Laude.  While at Hannibal LaGrange University, Elizabeth was a member of the HLGU Softball team for two years, Student Newspaper and Student Magazine for three years each, Student News Network for one year and a Member of Alpha Chi Honor Society and Phi Beta Lambda.  She is a 2012 graduate of Scotland County R-1 and the daughter of Michael Duzan and Marie and Curtis Ebeling, all of Memphis.

Scotland County 4-H Council Monthly Meeting Held May 18th

The Scotland County 4-H Council held their monthly meeting on May 18, 2016 at the Memphis Court House at 6:00 p.m.

Under old business, discussion on enrollment forms was discussed.  These forms need to be submitted by June 6th and arm bands will be available to purchase when the forms are submitted. Fair season passes are currently on sale for non-exhibitors for $30, the price will go up after June 1st. Kids age 7 and under are free.

Pre-Fair clean up will be on June 25 starting at 9 am. There is a shooting sports event the same day from 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.  Open Shows are scheduled for July 2nd.

Under new business, there was discussion about the Phillips family hosting a fishing derby with a number of different prizes. (The fishing derby was held May 21st at 2:00 with refreshments served).

Renee Blaine has offered to make a 4-H quilt for members to sell by selling raffle tickets at the Antique Fair. She will need thirty-two 4-H shirts by June 15th. Anyone willing to donate a 4-H shirt, including clubs shirts, state 4-H shooting sports shirts, local and other county fair shirts, and other shirts of that sort, whether it is a youth small or an adult extra large, can drop them off at the local Extension Office. Renee Blaine will use these shirts to make the 4-H quilt.

The July Council meeting, usually is followed by a meal and a swimming party, will be held on July 31st at the Memphis Legion Park. We hope to see you all out there!

Submitted by Jessica Huff (Council Reporter).

KATHRYN RUTH INGRAM BARNES (12/31/1933 – 4/14/2016)

Kathryn Ruth Ingram Barnes, 82, of Sarasota, Florida, died Thursday morning, April 14, 2016, at her home.

She was born December 31, 1933, in Tina, Missouri, to Melvin Curtis and Edythe Mae (Miller) Ingram.

She was united in marriage to John Richard Barnes on December 22, 1951, in Downing, Missouri.

Mrs. Barnes was preceded in death by her parents; one son, Richard L. Barnes; her in-laws, S.J. and Evelyn Barnes; a brother, David Ingram; sisters-in-law, Wilma Fitzgerald, Mary Lou McGeeney, and Carolyn Ingram; brothers-in-law, Augustus Crivolio, Ralph West, and Thomas McGeeney; nieces, Christy Eddlemen and Susan Veltri; and nephews, Robert Shellnut and Joseph West.

Surviving are her husband, Richard, of 64 years; a son, John Michael Barnes and wife Brenda of Sarasota, Florida; and a daughter, Terri Lynne Emel and husband Danny of Memphis, Missouri; sisters-in-law, Eva West of Ocala, Florida, Carol Crivolio of Ocala, Florida, and Donna Eddlemen of Zephyrhills, Florida and brother-in-law, David Barnes (Mary Ann) of Kahoka, Missouri. Also surviving are six grandchildren; Wendy (Chester) Gipson, Robert (Kathy) Barnes, Greg (Erin) Barnes, Evan (Andrea) Emel, Aaron (Ashley) Emel, and Nicholas Barnes; and great-grandchildren Madyson, Amanda, and Chester Gipson, John Jacob, Alexis, and Chase Barnes, Lily and Molly Barnes, Finley and Charley Emel, Isabella and Eva Emel, and Benjamin and Nathan Barnes as well as numerous nieces and nephews.

Kathryn attended elementary school in Tina, Missouri, and later moved to Downing, Missouri, where she attended and graduated from Downing High School.

After graduation she worked for a time in Burlington, Iowa before she got married.

After marrying her husband, they purchased the Prairie Farms Milk Dairy business and ran routes in Memphis, Missouri and surrounding towns for 20 years. During those years she also attended Keokuk Community College in Keokuk, Iowa, and taught school at St Vincent’s Catholic School while earning her associate degree. She then went on to Northeast Missouri State Teacher’s College in Kirksville, Missouri, earning a BS in Elementary Education. She taught in Luray and Kahoka, Missouri for 7 years.

In 1974, Kathryn and Richard moved to Sarasota, Florida; where she went on to attain her Masters Degree in Administration from Nova Southeastern University while teaching at Southside Elementary and Gulf Gate Elementary Schools until her retirement in 1996.

She loved teaching and kept in touch with many of her students after leaving her class. Her hobbies included making ceramics, biking, swimming, walking the beach, reading, growing roses, and doing word puzzles. She was also an avid collector of bells, cups and saucers, plates, and tea pots. She always treasured the time she spent with her grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

A memorial service at Toale Brothers Chapel will be held at 1:00 pm on Thursday, April 21, 2016.  In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Fruitville Public Library or Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.

Feel the Tug

There’s nothing like barreling down the lake in the spring or summer at 5:00 in the morning. The cool mist will wake up anybody. But it’s not really the air that is alarming, it’s the possibility of a big bass that is ready for breakfast; buzz bait style. To see the calm water come to life with a massive explosion is fishing at its finest. There is, however, a technique to this type of fishing. Most people when they see the bass strike, they immediately set the hook. That is a big mistake. You just missed another one. The art to catching bass on a buzz bait is not to set the hook when you see the bass strike but to wait until you feel the tug. The time between the two may only be a second but it’s the difference between success and failure. It is a hard discipline for some because we are so used to responding immediately to sight. It looks like a strike. It looks like I’ve got him. It looks like he’s on. But he’s not. Not until you feel the tug.

This is a great lesson for life. Most of the time, we live our lives according to what we see. And we react accordingly. We think whatever the circumstances look like, that is what they must be. If it looks hopeless, it must be. If it looks like the end, it must be. If it looks like there is no way out, there must not be. And we react accordingly. There is, however, a mechanism that God has placed within us. It’s a tug. It’s the voice of God saying, “Don’t walk by sight, but by faith.”  It is Him saying “Don’t ever count the situation hopeless until I have been added to the equation. It is Him saying that no matter how bleak the circumstance is, I will have the last word. Friend, don’t set the hook on your circumstances at the first sight of trouble. Wait on the tug of God and He will turn every situation into one that is worth keeping.

Gary Miller

Outdoor Truths Ministries

www.outdoortruths.org

Feels like Summer

Half of the gathering Sunday evening at Lobelia poured out to see the sky, and for a while, that was the party. Photo by Adriana.

Half of the gathering Sunday evening at Lobelia poured out to see the sky, and for a while, that was the party. Photo by Adriana.

Ted here to bring you the latest from Dancing Rabbit, after what felt like the first week of summer, complete with steady warmth, mild nights, and some good thunderstorms.

I had a second week off from my current day job last week, and managed to slowly tick off some long-awaited to-dos from my list. Moving more earth and manure to top up the soil level in the top-most planting terrace on our house’s berm, I finally got my artichoke seedlings planted alongside some leeks. I made long-awaited fixes to my bike (my current commuter conveyance), got my aging cheeses moved from the cave (root cellar) to their summer cottage (a small fridge in our shed), and got to spend much of a day in the garden with Sara for the first time this season, planting beans and thinning carrots and beets.

Zane, Aurelia, and Emma turned over a new leaf last week, boarding a school bus at 6:23 a.m. each morning on a journey to the first week of summer school in our county seat of Memphis. Cole and Nina from neighboring Red Earth Farms joined in as well, and of the five, only Emma had previous experience in public school, so the giddy excitement of both parents and kids Monday morning kept erupting into outbursts that were a little premature for that hour of the day. Eight out of ten parents were there, if a little bleary-eyed, with smiles all around as we waved goodbye and sauntered off to our strangely quiet days. *Sigh*…

With midwives off-call for a few weeks, Sara signed up for a midwifery training in Cedar Rapids, Iowa that we then extended into a short family camping vacation at a state park north of there. We brought kayaks with us for exploring a lake and river, and were rewarded with close encounters with a pair of bald eagles, trout, deer crossing the river, lots of geese with goslings, and some startling thumps and jumps from some catfish in the shallows. Peaceful walks in the wonderfully mature forest and plenty of s’mores and other camp food rounded out the slower-feeling week. As always, we were glad to return home and thankful to our friends who cared for our dog, cat, and plants in our absence.

We returned just in time for Saturday’s ultimate frisbee game. Our two scheduled games a week the past couple months finally turned reality with the weather cooperating and enough players for five-on-five showing up, not only for that game but for the following Tuesday and Saturday afternoons as well. Secondary action came in the form of the “healthy heart and lungs club” forming to do interval training one morning a week, in hopes of increasing stamina for our games. I don’t have as much fun running when I’m not chasing a disc, but I enjoyed the morning exercise with Mica and Alyssa all the same.

The grow-op had a work party Tuesday to get tomato starts in the ground after first hacking out some space in the overgrown Skyhouse gardens. Potatoes and onions are greening up out in Dan’s vineyard and the group will get cukes and squash in the ground as soon as we take delivery of another load of manure. Brent and Katherine got the rest of the tomatoes planted out Saturday, and Sunday morning. Christina and I finished the mulching work.

Buildings are growing and changing steadily, with Oliver finishing the walls on his cabin, Hassan cutting and installing corrugated steel for the 16 facets of the round house’s roof, and Kyle and Caleb roofing the fancifully timber-framed extended structure of the Critter summer kitchen.

Once-and-future residents Adriana and Justin arrived for a short visit Friday through the weekend, and seemed to bring a brightness and conviviality to our lives that I hadn’t quite realized I was missing. Seeing Zane and Aurelia descending the school bus steps Friday, recognizing Adriana (a good friend to both when she was in residence here), and running toward her for big hugs, I found myself near tears.

The kids had managed to ask her to take them to the pond for a swim in under a minute, picking up right where they left off in 2014. Every conversation through the weekend seemed to turn toward how and how soon we can get the two back to Dancing Rabbit from their current lives in New Orleans. There is a certain magic about that feeling of community, when the connections between people feel so mutually fulfilling.

I don’t believe we have previously written in our weekly update about our friend and community member Dennis, who has been dealt a series of blows to his health in recent months. Dennis and partner Sharon have been in St. Louis these several weeks, since effects of what has turned out to be a brain tumor sent them to a hospital there. Several Rabbits have joined family and friends of Sharon and Dennis in traveling to support them there intermittently, with more trips planned as he undergoes post-surgery rehab and radiation treatments there.

This past week we had both a mutual emotional support gathering and a logistical meeting here at the village around this difficult reality. For some, the emotional outlet allows heads and hearts to clear enough to allow engagement in the practical.

For many, the logistics side of things gives us a chance to do something tangible to help in a situation that we can’t control. The whole community is impacted in these times, and volunteering for the various things we collectively need and want to hold in caring for our friends and their homestead gives even those who haven’t known Dennis and Sharon for very long a way to help.

In a way that I often struggle to accept, life continues despite major upheavals in individual lives. Gardens are growing, demanding our ongoing time and energy so we can provide for our food needs (and send some to our friends in need). New work exchangers and visitors arrive in the village to see what we’re doing, and we each play a role in orienting them to our home, feeding them while they’re here, and teaching them what we know and what we do here. In this instance, we’ll be sharing more than usual, offering little glimpses of how we show up for each other in major life events, how the community sometimes feels like it breathes together.

Our second visitor session begins this week, though it is actually a first for us, a session to which only women have been invited. In Dancing Rabbit’s early days, in fact right about when I first tried to visit in 1999, there was a successful women’s straw bale building workshop held, but to my knowledge we haven’t had anything similar until now. (Editor’s note: a women’s plastering workshop was offered in 2000.) As a village that claims a feminist leaning, and given our recent gender imbalance, this is a good time for this good idea, and I’ve been hearing and feeling lots of excitement for it.

The Critters welcomed a new work exchanger this week named Melody, whose smiles through the week suggested she was settling in well. As one of the work exchanger liaisons this year, I get a chance to connect with each of these folk, and to reconnect with my own first landing here as an intern 15 years ago this summer.

A lot has changed in that time, and many faces have come and gone, but a good number are still here, and the spirit of the place, the purpose, has only grown bigger and more established. I’m still seeking one or more work exchangers for the second half of the season, if you’re wondering… please get in touch if you’re interested!

One thing that hasn’t changed much here over those 15 years is the appreciation of the beauty we live amidst. When a particularly resplendent thunderhead rolls by near sunset in late May, boiling in slow motion and rippling with lightning and shifting colors, we don’t just glance out the window or snap a photo… of 20 or so people gathered at Lobelia Sunday night to share one last meal with Adriana and Justin, half or more poured out to see the sky, and for a while, that was the party. Oohs and aahs and talking and laughing as this magic cloud mass erupted continually above us… my smile lasted well beyond our farewells to our friends.

Nearly all of the remaining spots for 2016 visitor sessions are now full, according to our correspondent Danielle, but if you’re still hoping to visit, remember that we offer public tours twice monthly through October, at 1pm on 2nd and 4th Saturdays. You can find information about other programs hosted at Dancing Rabbit this year on our website. The Milkweed Mercantile is open most late afternoons (pizza night Thursdays) and also hosts overnight guests. And we’ll of course have our annual Open House in September as well. One way or another, we hope to see you here!

Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage is an intentional community and educational non-profit outside Rutledge, MO, focused on demonstrating sustainable living possibilities. The next public tour is at 1pm on Saturday June 11th. Reservations not required. Tours are free, though donations to help us continue our educational and outreach efforts are gratefully accepted. For directions, call the office at 660-883-5511 or email us at dancingrabbit@ic.org. To find out more about us, you can also check out our website: www.dancingrabbit.org.

SHARON MAE VEATCH (5/6/1939 – 5/25/2016)

Sharon Mae (Wise) Veatch, 77 of Lancaster, Missouri passed away on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 at the Scotland County Care Center in Memphis, Missouri.

The daughter of Samuel John and Laura Mae (Graves) Wise, she was born on May 6, 1939 in Los Angeles, California. She was united in marriage to Everett Gillespie and to this union Karan and Ellen were born.  She was later united in marriage to Charles Edward Hendricks and to this union Chuck and Sandy were born.  On October 31, 2001, she was united in marriage to Charles Veatch in Lancaster, Missouri.

Survivors include her children, Karan Farrell and husband, Victor of Glenwood, Missouri, Ellen Jarvis and husband, Terry of Jefferson City, Missouri, Chuck Hendricks of Glenwood, Missouri and Sandy Hendricks of Queen City, Missouri; eight grandchildren, Jayson Meloche of Detroit, Michigan, Stephen Justin Flaspohler of Jefferson City, Missouri, Scott Jarvis of Jefferson City, Missouri, Mark Jarvis of Jefferson City, Missouri, Laura Jarvis of Jefferson City, Missouri, Colt Hendricks of Houston, Texas, John Minkler of Kirksville, Missouri, Emily Simmons of Queen City, Missouri; nine great-grandchildren; three stepdaughters, Brenda Hauk of Quincy, Illinois, Twyla Veatch of Queen City, Missouri and Melinda Followwell and husband, Scott of Green Castle, Missouri; two stepsons, John Veatch of Unionville, Missouri and Laylon Veatch of Livonia, Missouri and one half brother, John Harris and wife of California and one half sister, Pat Harris of California; one sister-in-law, Betty Fifer of Lancaster, Missouri; nieces and nephews and other family members.

Sharon is preceded in death by parents; husband, Charles, on December 30, 2005; one infant sister, Gladys Wise and two-step daughters, Beverly Robinson and Debbie Miller.

She was a graduate of the Knox County High School and attended Northeast Missouri State Teachers College for approximately three years, earning an LPN certification. She practiced nursing for 34 years at the Laughlin Hospital in Kirksville, Missouri, Kirksville Osteopathic Hospital in Kirksville, Missouri and the Knox County Nursing Home in Edina, Missouri.  She was also a dispatcher for the Schuyler County Sheriff’s office for approximately seven years.

She loved traveling with her husband, Charlie Veatch, doing family genealogy, had a joy for animals and also had owned a pet shop in Kirksville, Missouri for approximately five years.

She enjoyed spending time with her family, grandchildren and friends.

Graveside services were held on Wednesday, June 1, 2016 at the Glenwood Cemetery in Glenwood, Missouri with Sonny Smyser, Pastor of the Schuyler County Church of Faith officiating.  Pallbearers were Terry Jarvis, Victor Farrell, Gary Moffett, Stephen Justin Flaspohler, Scott Jarvis and Mark Jarvis.  Online condolences may be expressed to the family by logging on to normanfh.com.

Arrangements were under the direction of the Norman Funeral Home of Lancaster, Missouri.

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