August 14, 2003

Memphis City Council Approves First Price Increase For Water Since 1992

Back in 1992 a utility customer in the City of Memphis paid just $10.80 for 3,000 gallons of water. In 2003 that same customer paid just $10.80 for the same amount of water. But after more than a decade without a price increase the Memphis City Council voted 3-1 to raise water rates during the August 7 council meeting.

"Everything is going up in price but our water rates have not increased in 11 years so we ultimately are losing money," stated Alderman Ronnie Gardner.

Mayor Ron Alexander illustrated the issue by reading financial figures from the city's water department over the past four years. The department saw a positive balance of more than $250,000 quickly evaporate over the past four years dropping to $7,235.74 in the red in 2003.

"There's not been a rate increase since 1992," Alexander said. "Over that time all the costs of producing the water, chemicals, salaries for the water plant employees, these expenses have increased and we have not passed that on to the customers."

Gardner presented a report generated by Water Superintendent Dennis Howard representing municipal water rates charged by surrounding communities.

He highlighted Lancaster as a similarly sized community and pointed out the neighbor to the west charges $20.48 for 3,000 gallons of water compared to only $10.80 for the same amount of water paid by Memphis consumers.

Sewer rates also were equally disproportionate as Memphis customers paid $3.60 for 3,000 gallons compared to $8.50 in Lancaster.

Street Superintendent Roy Monroe added to the discussion noting that as a customer of rural water he pays more than $40.00 for 3,000 gallons of water each month.

Citizen Jim Nishida-Adams interjected a public comment into the discussion expressing his opinion that it was not a good reason to raise rates simply because neighboring providers were higher.

The council quickly answered this charge by consensus noting that the city water department is going in the hole under the current rates.

Mayor Alexander pointed out the city water plant is now running 24-hours a day to meet peak demand. Despite the increase in production the department has managed to cut back on expenses by reducing the manpower and not replacing employees lost to retirement.

But even with cost cutting measures an analysis from the city's engineering firm, Allstate Consultants indicated the firm believes it is time to begin passing on some of the added costs to the consumers.

A summary of the company's water rate analysis estimated the cost of producing one year's worth of water in 2003 was approximately $540,000. The estimate was calculated based on a cost of $3.94 to $3.97 per 1,000 gallons of water produced.

The analysis offered two separate scenarios for proposed rate increases for the city.

Scenario one suggested an increase to $7.41 for the minimum of 1,000 gallons charged to each customer. The proposal recommended an increase to $3.97 charged per every additional 1,000 gallons used that month. Sewer rates would go up to $3 for the minimum and $1.50 per each additional 1,000 gallons. The projected revenues under the scenario would be $275,500 from city water customers, $191,400 from the rural water district and $76,800 from sewer for a total expected revenue of $543,700, or basically the estimated break even point at last year's production costs.

Scenario two calls for a raise in the minimum water charge to $9 for $1,000 gallons and $4.17 for each 1,000 gallons beyond that. The same sewer rates would be used in both scenarios. The second option would generate an estimated $294,700 in revenue from city customers. The rural water district revenue would be unchanged as the rate charged to the rural water district for purchasing water from the city is determined by a contractually specified formula.

The second option ultimately would create an estimated revenue total of $562,900.

The report went on to stress that the city needs to be making annual deposits of roughly $100,000 from the water revenues into the city water department's Repair and Replacement (R&R) account to allow the city to maintain its water and sewer infrastructure. The analysis pinpointed the fact that under scenario one the city likely would not have any revenue beyond expenses to set aside for the R & R fund.

The council voted 3-1 to implement scenario two. The price increase will take the form of a city ordinance that will be read at the September city council meeting at which time the price increase will be implemented

Alderman Mike Stone, the lone no vote on the issue, indicated he was concerned about the effect raising costs would have on the elderly and those customers living on fixed incomes.

Mayor Alexander, while he expressed the obvious need to increase the rates, also voiced concern the impact of price increases would have on the bigger, commercial customers.

Under scenario two the average customer that uses more than 5,000 gallons will see their water bill increase by 44.5 percent. The hospital and care center, two of the city's biggest water customers also will see significant cost increases of more than 40 percent.

Extension to Offer Master Gardener Training

Master Gardener training classes will be offered September 14 through December 7, 2017 at the University of Missouri Extension Center in Kirksville. Classes will be held Thursday afternoons from 1 to 4 p.m.

The University of Missouri Extension Master Gardener classes will cover a variety of horticulture topics including diseases, insects, soils & fertilizer, vegetables, fruit trees & shrubs, pruning, lawn care, flowers and landscaping. Some classes will have garden tours. To be a Master Gardener, you must attend 30 hours of classroom training AND provide 30 hours of volunteer service your first year after training.

The deadline to register is Friday, September 8. For more information and to register visit our website at http://extension.missouri.edu/adair or contact the Adair County Extension Center at 660-665-9866.

University of Missouri Extension provides equal opportunity to all participants in extension programs and activities, and for all employees and applicants for employment on the basis of their demonstrated ability and competence without discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, genetic information, disability, or protected veteran status.

Deputy Jeremy Head Joins Scotland County Sheriff’s Office

Novelty-native Jeremy Head has joined the Scotland County Sheriff’s Office as a new deputy.

The Scotland County Sheriff’s Office has added a new deputy to its law enforcement team. Sheriff Wayne Winn announced the hiring of Jeremy Head, who will be joining Winn and chief deputy Bryan Whitney as the department’s three full-time officers.

Head will fill the vacancy created by the official retirement of long-time highway patrolman Roger Gosney, who had been working part-time for the sheriff’s office as a deputy.

Head is returning to his northeast Missouri roots. He grew up in Novelty and attended school at Kirksville and Knox County. He entered the United States Army following graduation. He spent time as a truck driver following the service, before ultimately deciding to pursue a career in law enforcement.

He attended the Central Missouri Police Academy on the Campus of the University of Central Missouri in Warrensburg. Following completion of his training and certification, Head worked for the Lafayette County Sheriff’s Office, near Kansas City for a year.

Head said he hoped to get back closer to home and was happy to have the opportunity in Scotland County, especially now that his father resides here.

He officially started with the Scotland County Sheriff’s Office on Tuesday, August 15th.

Alarm, Rapid Response Foil Pharmacy Burglary Attempt

Surveillance video caught a burglar attempting to gain entry into the Scotland County Pharmacy on August 16th.

The drive-thru window at the Scotland County Pharmacy proved to be closed for an unwelcomed early morning visitor on Wednesday, August 16th.

The security system at the pharmacy, located just off of Highway 136 near Shopko, was triggered at 2:45 a.m. when a burglar attempted to gain entry to the building by breaking out the glass in the drive-up window, on the east side of the building.

Surveillance video shows a single masked individual using a hand tool to break the glass and then carefully remove the pieces. Apparently the would-be burglar was not careful enough, as the actions ultimately set off the building’s alarm, which caused the burglar to calmly exit to the north, the direction from which he or she approached.

The security company contacted the Scotland County dispatch, and an officer from the Memphis Police Department was dispatched at 2:47 a.m., arriving on scene at 2:50 a.m.

“I want to say what an incredible job Bill Holland did,” said Pharmacy owner Matt McKee of the Memphis Police Chief. “He responded and was at the scene in minutes.”

McKee has offered a $1,000 reward for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the burglar(s).

Holland stated the Police Department is following up on numerous tips. As of August 22nd no arrests have been made.

One such bogus lead has landed a Memphis man in trouble.

On August 19th, Charles J. Smart, 34, was ticketed for making a false report to the MPD in regards to the burglary. He is set to appear in the Scotland County Court on September 9th on the class B misdemeanor charge.

Northeast Missouri Genealogical Society to Meet August 26th at Heartland 

The Northeast Missouri Genealogical Society will hold their third meeting of the year on Saturday, August 26 at 10:00 a.m., at the Solid Rock Café, located at Heartland Community, 2 miles south of Newark, Missouri on highway Rte. E. Attendees, please note that Route 156 just east of Newark is closed to traffic due to bridge repairs.

Sharon Harrison, president of the Northeast Missouri Genealogical Society, will conduct the business meeting

Lois Hunziker, Meg Glover, and Brent Karhoff will present a program titled “Newark:  A Hamlet With a History”.  Lois Hunziker is a Director of the Northeast Missouri Genealogical Society, Meg Glover is the author of a history of Newark and Brent Karhoff is the president of the Knox County Historical Society.  The trio will be telling the history of Newark using old newspaper articles, letters and memoirs from Newark’s citizens of the past, especially those who lived during the time of the Civil War.

The Northeast Missouri Genealogical Society serves 14 counties in northeast Missouri and the quarterly meetings are scheduled at various locations to make it possible for the outlying members to attend.  The Society is dedicated to the collection of genealogy materials, both published and unpublished, for printing in the “Northeast Reporter”.  The 33 page quarterly is published each April, June, August and October.

The public and those interested in family research are welcome to attend. For information call (573) 221-7282.

Truck Driver Hurt When Semi Overturns on Highway 136

A Harris, MO truck driver suffered minor injuries after his semi overturned in Scotland County early on the morning of August 11th.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, William J. Miller, 37, was eastbound on Highway 136 in a 2005 Volvo Tractor Trailer when the vehicle traveled off the right side of the roadway, approximately five miles west of Memphis. The semi overturned in the accident.

Miller sustained minor injuries and was transported to Scotland County Hospital by Scotland County Ambulance.

The vehicle sustained total damage and was removed from the scene by Lakeside Towing of Memphis.

The Patrol was assisted at the scene by the Scotland County Sheriff’s Office and Scotland County Ambulance.

Scotland County Senior Nutrition Center

MENU

Thursday, August 24 – Roast Pork, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Sauerkraut, Cranberry Sauce, Slice Bread, Ice Cream

Friday, August 25 – Fish Fillets, Macaroni Salad, Baked Beans, Cornbread, Strawberry Shortcake

Monday, August 28 – Tenderloin/Bun, Onion Slice, Pasta Veggie Salad, Green Beans, Watermelon and Cantaloupe

Tuesday, August 29 – Chicken Strips, Scalloped Cabbage, Buttered Corn, Bread, Fruit Crisp

Wednesday, August 30 – Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Green Beans, Hot Roll, Mixed Fruit

Thursday, August 31 – Swiss Steak, Hash Brown Casserole, Cauliflower Blend Veggies, Bread, Pudding and Fruit

ACTIVITIES

Thursday, August 24 – Card party at 5:00 p.m.

Sunday, August 27 – Center is rented.

Thursday, August 31 – Card party at 5:00 p.m.

SCR-I School Menus

Breakfast

Thursday, August 24 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Friday, August 25 – Sausage/Gravy Biscuits, Choice of Cereal, Cinnamon Toast, Banana, Juice/Milk

Monday, August 28 – Pancakes, Choice of Cereal, Sausage Link, Toast/Jelly, Strawberries, Juice/Milk

Tuesday, August 29 – Cinnamon Rolls, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Slices, Juice/Milk

Wednesday, August 30 – Ham/Egg/Cheese Croissant, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Fruit Medley, Juice/Milk

Thursday, August 31 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Lunch

Thursday, August 24 – Spaghetti/Meat Sauce, Chicken Fajitas, Hamburger Bar, Green Beans, Garlic Bread, Sliced Peaches, Fresh Fruit

Friday, August 25 – Chicken Nuggets, Fish Sticks, Macaroni and Cheese, Cole Slaw, Chocolate Ice Cream, Mandarin Orange Slices, Fresh Fruit

Monday, August 28 – Crispy Chicken Strips, Grilled Cheese Sandwich, 5th/6th Grade Chef Salad, Tri Potato Patty, Buttered Corn, Mandarin Orange Slices, Fresh Fruit

Tuesday, August 29 – School Made Pizza, BBQ Meatballs/Roll, 5th/6th Grade Taco Bar, Vegetable Sticks/Dip, Applesauce, Fresh Fruit

Wednesday, August 30 – Country Fried Steak, Chicken and Noodles, 5th/6th Grade Potato Bar, Whipped Potatoes/Gravy, Carrot Coins, Dinner Roll, Sliced Pears, Fresh Fruit

Thursday, August 31– Goulash, Mini Corn Dogs, Hamburger Bar, Green Beans, Garlic Bread, Applesauce, Fresh Fruit

Local 4-H Youth Take Part In 2017 Missouri State Fair

Elsie Kigar gives a 4-H demonstration “How to Make Homemade Noodles” at the 2017 Missouri State Fair in Sedalia.

SEDALIA, MISSOURI —  On August 13, 2017, Elsie and Eli  Kigar from the Jolly Jacks & Jills 4-H club in Scotland County presented demonstrations at the Missouri State Fair in the 4-H Building on the fairgrounds in Sedalia.

Elsie’s demonstration was entitled  “How to Make Homemade Noodles” while Eli gave a presentation entitled “How to Make A Dirt Hole Set for Trapping”.

The siblings were among the 300 youth selected to give a demonstration in the 4-H Building at the Missouri State Fair.  Missouri 4-H members compete at the county events in order to qualify for the State Fair 4-H Building demonstrations.

Demonstrations are a great way of sharing what the youth has learned in 4-H projects.  Preparing for a demonstration helps 4-H youth develop research, organization and communication skills.  Presenting a demonstration in front of a group helps 4-H youth build poise, confidence and public speaking skills.

For more information about the University of Missouri Extension 4-H program, contact Kristy Eggleston-Wood at the Scotland County Extension Center at 660-465-7255.

Eli Kigar receives his ribbon for being a presenter at the 2017 Missouri State Fair.

Putnam County Stops SCR-I 3-2 in Softball Season Opener

Katie Feeney’s head-first slide into home just beats the tag as she scored on a wild pitch in the third inning to knot the score at 2-2.

Ashleigh Creek smashed the first strike she saw in her senior season for a solo home run on Monday night in Memphis, but it was not enough as Scotland County fell to Putnam County 3-2 in the 2017 season debut for the Lady Tigers.

The Lady Midgets jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the top of the first with a couple of base hits.

But Creek trimmed the deficit to 2-1 when she led off in the bottom of the second inning, crushing a line drive over the left field fence to make the score 2-1. Khloe Hamlin and Abby Blessing followed with base hits to give SCR-I a chance at a big inning, but both runners were stranded.

SCR-I erased a lead off error in the third when catcher Katie Feeney gunned down a would-be base stealer at second with a nice catch and tag by shortstop Khloe Hamlin.

The momentum carried over to the bottom of the third when Feeney led off with a base hit. She stole second base and moved into scoring position on a ground out by Kaitlyn McMinn. The sophomore then sprinted home and her head-first slide just avoided the tag on a wild pitch to knot the score at 2-2.

But Putnam County pulled ahead for good in the top of the fourth inning. A pair of singles and a hit by pitch loaded the bases with two outs when a blooper fell in behind the mound and everyone was safe to make the score 3-2.

Creek worked out of a jam in the seventh, stranding a pair of runners.

Unfortunately, SCR-I managed just one base runner over the final four innings, a two-out single by Creek in the sixth, as Putnam County held on for the 3-2 win.

Creek took the loss on the mound, allowing three runs, two earned, on six hits and a hit by pitch. She struck out eight in seven innings of work.

Sammi Bradshaw limited SCR-I to two runs on five hits while striking out five.

Creek went 2-3 with a home run, an RBI and a run scored. Feeney, Hamlin and Blessing recorded the other hits, all going 1-3.

MARY LOUISE BROWN (10/30/1918 – 8/17/2017)

Mary Louise Brown, 98, died Thursday, August 17, 2017, at her home in Carbondale, IL surrounded by loving family.

She was born October 30, 1918, in Kirksville, MO, to George E. and Nannie Moore Leslie. She grew up in Memphis, MO, where she attended public schools and was valedictorian of her high school class. Following graduation with a Bachelors Degree from Kirksville State College, she taught in high schools in Kirksville and Monticello, MO. She was married in 1940 to Clyde Moseley Brown. In 1951 they moved to Carbondale, IL where they raised their family. After his death in 1965, she worked in Academic Advisement at Southern Illinois University until her retirement in 1988.

Mary Lou was a devoted mother, survived by her children Nancy Cook (Greg) of Makanda, IL, Susie Ellison (Lee) of Portland, OR, Bill Brown of New Braunfels, TX, Rosemary Hopson (Jack) of St. Louis, MO, Laura Ventetuolo of Cranston, RI, and Charles Brown (Jeanne) of Beltsville, MD. She was grandmother of 11 and great-grandmother of 23 children. She is also survived by her sister Nancy Harris of Memphis, MO and many nieces and nephews. She will be missed by many longtime friends and neighbors and by her dedicated caregivers, Diana, Eva, Rachel and Pat.

Mary Lou was an active member of the First United Methodist Church of Carbondale for 66 years, and of Chapter GX, PEO Sisterhood. She volunteered in her children’s schools and scouts. Among her many interests were traveling with family, playing bridge, gardening and reading. She was an enthusiastic supporter of Saluki Basketball, attending all home games for many years.

Services for Mary Lou were held Wednesday, August 23, at First United Methodist Church, in Carbondale, IL with Rev. Alan Rhein officiating. Burial followed in Oakland Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory to First United Methodist Church, Hospice of Southern Illinois or a charity of the donor’s choice will be appreciated. Envelopes will be available at the church.

Meredith Funeral Home, Carbondale assisted the family with arrangements.

To share a story or memory of Mary Lou please visit, www.meredithfh.com.

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