August 1, 2002

SCR-I Board Appoints Committee To Consider School Surveillance System

The Board of Education met in regular session on July 26, with six members present. Board member Paul Campbell was absent. The board considered one item under old business, and 13 items under new business.

Old Business:

Report On Sale of School Freezer - Superintendent LeRoy Huff reported to the board on the sale of the old food service freezer at the high school. He informed the board that seven bids had been received and the high bid was in the amount of $1,101.33. Those bidding on the unit and the amounts bid were as follows: Harmony Hills of Unionville, $450; Chester Hosletter of Drakesville, IA, $500; Chariton Valley Beef, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, $611; Kevin Small of Memphis, $765; Lyle Sutts of Lewistown, $930; and Doren Miller of Clarksville, MO, $1,001.00. The freezer was awarded to Roland and Ronald Meyer of St. Louis, who had submitted the high bid.

New Business:

Renew M.A.R.E. Member-ship - The Scotland County R-I Schools has belonged to Missouri Association of Rural Education, (M.A.R.E.) for the past six years. This association was organized to be of assistance to rural schools and the problems faced by rural education. The association provides numerous services to its members. Included among these services are new board member training, workshops, and meetings to help improve rural schools. The board voted unanimously to continue their membership with M.A.R.E.

Surveillance Project - High School Principal Dave Shalley and Special Education Director, Rhonda McBee, have been examining the concept of a security system for the secondary facility. They presented to the board their recommendation along with how the project would be funded. The system will use 15 cameras around the exterior of the premises and in the halls of the high school. Rhonda explained to the board that the school applied for and received a grant to implement the project. Mr. Shalley informed the board that several schools in the area currently use security systems including Clark County R-I and Highland. The board authorized by a six-zero vote the appointment of a committee of Ellen Aylward and David Kirkpatrick to meet with Mr. Shalley, Mrs. McBee and Mr. Huff to accept the best proposal for the project as long as all funding comes from grant monies.

Discuss Lunch Prices For 2002-2003 School Year - Following a study of comparative lunch and breakfast prices among six schools conducted by the District's Food Service Director Terry Arnold, the board voted unanimously to keep all school meal prices the same for fiscal year 2002-2003, as they were this past year. The K-six breakfast will cost 90 cents, seven-12 breakfast 90 cents, and the adult breakfast $1.10. The K-six lunch will cost $1.25, seven-12 lunch $1.30 and adult lunch will be $1.60.

Adopt Electronic Device Policy - Last year the district had asked the Mickes Law Firm to draft for it an electronic device policy for the school to implement. Since school had already started the board postponed acceptance and implementation of the policy written by the Mickes firm until fiscal year 2002-2003. The board voted six-zero to implement the policy as written for the upcoming school year. The policy adopted by the board is as follows:

Electronic Devices - The possession or use of beepers, cell phones, and other means of electronic communication is prohibited in all school facilities and school activities during regular school hours by students. Such use is considered a disruption of the educational environment.

First Offense: Detention/ISS, confiscation of device (returned to parent), contact parents.

Second Offense: ISS/OSS, confiscation of device (returned to parent), contact parents.

Third Offense: OSS, confiscation of device, contact parents.

The use or possession of laser pointers at school or at any school-sponsored activity is prohibited.

First Offense: Detention/ ISS, confiscation.

Second Offense: ISS, confiscation.

Third Offense: OSS, confiscation.

Set Tuition Rates For Fiscal Year 2002-2003 - The board voted six-zero last night to establish the tuition rates for fiscal year 2002-2003. The tuition rate for secondary will be $6,203 and for elementary $4,435. This represents a 1.6% increase in the tuition rate over last year. The 1.6% figure that was used for setting the rate is the (CPI) consumer price index for the year. This figure is provided annually by the state auditor's office and reflects the increase in the cost of living over the previous fiscal year.

Set Tax Rate Hearing Date - The board voted six-zero to set the date for the annual tax rate hearing on August 29th at 6:15 p.m. prior to the regular meeting of the Board of Education. An annual hearing must be held before the tax rate for the new fiscal year can be established.

Assign At-Risk And Homeless Coordinator For Fiscal Year 2002-2003 - Annually, DESE requires the district to appoint an At-Risk and a Homeless Coordinator to serve the needs of those students who are in need of special services that these coordinators would provide. Ken Cross is our current Homeless Coordinator and he had agreed to also serve the district as our At-Risk Coordinator. The board voted unanimously to offer both of these positions to Mr. Cross.

Establish Date For Celebration Of Excellence Dinner, New Teacher Dinner/Picnic, And Staff Breakfast - The board voted unanimously to host three events for staff this fall. These events will be as follows: August 19th will be the date for the new employee picnic at 6:00 p.m. at the Memphis Lake; August 20th at 7:30 a.m. in the High School commons is the date the board established for the breakfast for all school employees before school begins on August 21st; and October 22nd was the date the board adopted for the Celebration of Excellence V Dinner to be held in the high school gym at 7:00 p.m.

Discuss Elementary Vesti-bule Project - The board discussed at some length how best to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of student achieve-ment in the lower elementary grades. Everyone was in agreement that we should not have P.E. first thing in the morning. What we should do is to have our children focus on their academics while their minds are fresh each day. This cannot currently happen because of the "bottle neck" caused by the gym doubling as our lunchroom.

To accommodate this problem major work has been done by Mr. Moore, Mr. Shalley and Superintendent Huff to arrange schedules so that staff assignments will align in both buildings since both buildings share staff. For the concept to work successfully a gym curtain needs to be installed in the gym/cafeteria in order for one half of the gym to have P.E. while the other half of the gym is used as a cafeteria for breakfast and lunch. To complete the project the board also studied a proposal to enclose the overhang at the southeast entrance to the elementary gym. This would in effect make this a vestibule much like the west entrance at the high school.

The cost of the gym curtain would be $4,500 and the vestibule enclosure should not exceed $7,100. After deliberate and thoughtful consideration the board voted six - zero to approve the construction of an elementary vestibule and purchase the curtain for the gym.

Accept Procedural Evalua-tion - Each year one of the procedural evaluation reports required is School Safety. Linda Gray the district's safety coordinator, prepared the school's safety program report for the board to consider. Following Linda's written report, the board voted six - zero to accept her recommendation as presented. A second procedural evaluation, prepared by Linda Gray, was the report on School Facilities and Grounds. Again, following an appropriate period of discussion the board voted six - zero to accept Linda's report as presented.

Amend 2002-2003 Budget - Following the receipt of additional revenue from the federal government in Title monies, a Rural Education Enhancement Grant, and expenditures to off-set the additional federal monies the board voted six - zero to amend the budget to accommodate these new monies and expenditures for fiscal year 2002-2003.

Approval Of Annual Secre-tary Of The Board Report (ASBR) - Annually, following the close of business for the fiscal year, the district must report to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education the status of the district's finances and other academic programs for the preceding year. This is called the Annual Secretary of the Board Report (ASBR). Before the document can be officially mailed to DESE the Board of Education, at the July meeting must approve the report so it can be submitted by the August 15th deadline. The board reviewed the report for fiscal year 2001-2002. As we analyze the year financially, the district was able to pay $58,630.00 for a bus, $9,846.00 for a new mower for the custodial department, $6,200.00 for a new curtain for the high school gym, $13,036.25 for a new freezer for the food service department, $14,039 for the elementary overhang and numerous other items that were not a part of the budget for last year. Superintendent Huff explained to the board that it is significant to note that these unbudgeted expenses were paid for out of the fiscal year 2001-2002 budget and the district was still able to end the year with a balanced budget. I expressed my appreciation to the board for their patience in insuring that we continue a policy of financial solvency. I also thanked the board for their support and told them that without the board's cooperation this would not have been possible. The board voted six - zero to accept the ASBR report following an appropriate period of discussion.

Permission To Advertise For Title Instruction Assistant - With the verbal resignation of Angela Westhoff this month, a vacancy has occurred in our instructional aide staff. Angela has resigned to assist her husband, Scott manage Rose Hardware Store. The board voted six - zero to advertise for an instructional assistant to begin work on August 21st. Persons desiring to apply for the position must have a minimum of 60 college hours of credit.

Executive Session - In Executive Session, the only issue the board considered was a review of personnel issues.

Area Students Named to Buena Vista University Graduate & Professional Studies Dean’s List

STORM LAKE, IA – The following area students have been named to the Dean’s List at Buena Vista University Graduate & Professional Studies for terms one and two:

Hilary Harris of Memphis, Mo., who attends Buena Vista University Graduate & Professional Studies Ottumwa location.

Shelbie Jones of Greentop, Mo., who attends Buena Vista University Graduate & Professional Studies Ottumwa location.

Derrick Muntz of Memphis, Mo., who attends Buena Vista University Graduate & Professional Studies Ottumwa location.

Students named to the Dean’s List must have a minimum grade point average of 3.5 for the two terms, based on a 4.0 grade point system, and must have taken at least 12 hours of coursework.

Buena Vista University’s main campus in Storm Lake, Iowa, was founded in 1891, and its Graduate & Professional Studies (GPS) degree-completion program began 40 years ago. Today, the GPS program’s 16 learning locations and online courses have given more than 15,500 graduates the opportunity to expand their potential with a pace, academic rigor, and class sizes that appeal to a wide variety of students. A diverse menu of over 50 different programs and courses designed for working adults delivers options that meet many educational needs, and a variety of class formats make scheduling even more convenient. Visit www.bvu.edu/gps.

Buena Vista University blends liberal arts with real-world experiences, preparing students for lifelong success, especially in the areas of elementary, secondary, and special education; business and accounting; and biological and chemical sciences. BVU is an affordable option for all students and, combined with its academic programs, has led U.S. News & World Report to rank BVU as the third best value school among Midwest Regional Colleges.

Rotary Collecting Shoes for Orphan Soles

shoes feature web

Rotary President, Bill Kiddoo has announced the local Rotary Club will take part in the District 6040 annual shoe drive.  To date, over fourteen years, Missouri Rotarians have contributed 270,528 pairs of shoes and $8,513 in cash.

Shoes and socks collected go to the most vulnerable children around the world.  This includes orphans, children who have lost one or both parents, those who live in institutionalized care, or poverty.

Donated shoes must be new, uppers with shoe strings or Velcro and hard soles and heels.  No open-toed or flip flops are allowed.  Donated cash helps to pay for shipping cost to Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America.  Shoes sizes should be for children ages one to teens.

You may bring shoes or cash to the Rotary Building at noon on any Tuesday, contact any Rotarian, or leave your donation at Cook’s Mens Store. This year’s shoe drive will end on April 16, 2016.

Gundy Named to Culver-Stockton College’s President’s List

CANTON – Delaney Gundy, a junior Art Education major from Gorin, was named to Culver-Stockton’s President’s List for work done during the fall 2015 semester.

To be named to the President’s List, Culver-Stockton College requires students to meet high academic standards. President’s List students have earned a 4.0 GPA and were enrolled in a minimum of 12 hours.

C-SC also announced its Honor Roll for the fall 2015 semester. To be named to the Honor Roll, students must meet high academic standards established by Culver-Stockton.

Local students honored included Ashley Watson of Brashear and Wyatt Kice of Memphis.

Culver-Stockton College, located in Canton, Mo., is a four-year residential institution in affiliation with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). C-SC specializes in experiential education and is one of only two colleges in the nation to offer the 12/3 semester calendar, where the typical 15 week semester is divided into two terms, a 12-week term and a 3-week term.

The C-SC Wildcats are members of the Heart of America Athletic Conference (HAAC) and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA).

Azen Jolly Timers Host February Club Meeting

The Azen Jolly Timers met at the Scotland County Hospital on February 3rd at 6 p.m. Alisa Kigar, Communication Specialist from SCH, led the group on a hospital tour.  Following the tour President Brock Aylward called the meeting to order. Pledges were led by Penelope Cline and Kendal Anderson. Roll call was your Super Bowl prediction.

The minutes were read by Bryn Aylward.  Kendal Anderson moved to approve and Abby Doster seconded the motion, motion passed. The treasurer’s report was read by Bailegh Phillips. Penelope Cline moved to pay bills and Brenna Phillips seconded the motion, motion passed.

In the report of project groups the Clover Kids met January 6th at the United Methodist Church and completed terrariums. In new business the achievement event will be March 6th  at the SCR-1 Elementary School. Registration begins at 1:30. Enrollment forms were passed out and are due back to Kristy by February 26th.  Dog school will begin on Feb.22nd and continue every Monday.

Demonstrations next month will be Avery Cowell and Jacob Stott.

Next month refreshments will be provided by Mohrs (snacks) and Justin Cowell (drinks).

Penelope Cline moved to adjourn the meeting and Kendal Anderson seconded the motion, the meeting was adjourned.

Submitted by Bryn Aylward. Reporter

Columbaria, Mapping Among Upgrades Being Considered at Memphis Cemetery

columbaria web

Improvements and upgrades for the municipal cemetery were a focus point of the February 4th meeting of the Memphis City Council. The board of aldermen reviewed a preliminary proposal for the addition of a columbaria, a structure or building that includes niches to house funeral urns for cremation remains.

A proposal is being considered to ad such a structure in the recently completed scattering garden at the Memphis Cemetery. Initial estimates have established costs ranging from $25,000 – $40,000 for stand-alone walls or structures with outside access of 70-90 niches.

Ron Henkenius of Memphis Funeral Home has been working with City Superintendent Roy Monroe to gather information for the proposal.

“Predictions at present, estimate that in 15 years cremation will be selected by 85 to 90 percent of the public,” said Henkenius.

The cost of the columbaria would be recovered over time in the purchase price of niche space, which was estimated between $650 – $800.

The city has been requested to provide digital photography of the proposed site to allow professional rendering of an official proposal, free of charge.

The council also considered a proposal from Midland GIS Solutions for digital GPS mapping of the cemetery.

The Maryville-based company currently is performing GPS mapping of the city’s utility systems.

The proposal calls for digital aerial photography integration into the cemetery mapping GIS program to be used for visual ground reference. The mapping would establish cemetery lot boundaries as accurately as possible using coordinate geometry.

While the proposal would only identify plots by section, block, lot and space numbers, the data base would be available for the city to add additional information, such as the name, plot classification (open, sold, closed, etc.), date of birth, date of death and additional comments.

As part of the proposal, the company would also create an online cemetery mapping program, which if the city chose, could be made available to the public for research purposes.

The bid included a 47,000 price tag for the mapping, $2,500 for the online mapping program, and $1,200 for a one year data hosting agreement for a total cost of $10,700.

The council tabled the bid until further details are received regarding the actual mapping process, and if GPS coordinates will be used to accurately establish all plot sizes and locations, or if the mapping is simply based on descriptions and existing mapping.

Continuing on the cemetery topic, Monroe presented a preliminary estimate for resurfacing the driving surface at the site. Monroe stated preliminary figures were approximately $150,000 for a hot-mix resurfacing of the 1.7 miles of road in the cemetery.

Due to the cost, Monroe suggested considering using city crews to make asphalt upgrades where feasible and added he was working on some preliminary plans to install additional parking areas.

Monroe also reported initial groundwork with the USDA office regarding mapping of possible terrace installation or other upgrades to remedy an expanding ditch issue on the new cemetery ground.

“The experts told us that cemeteries are notorious for runoff issues,” said Monroe. “Because they are mowed and manicured so well, they produce as much as 90% runoff of storm water, which can lead to ditch issues.”

Duley, Hunolt Named to Northwest’s Honor Roll

The Office of the Registrar at Northwest Missouri State University announced the names of students named to the Academic or President’s Honor Roll at the end of the 2015 fall trimester.

To be included on the Academic Honor Roll a student must carry a minimum of 12 credit hours and attain a grade point average of 3.50 or above on a 4.00 scale. Students named to the President’s Honor Roll have attained a perfect 4.00 GPA for the trimester.

Anna A. Duley of Memphis and Andrew M. Hunolt of Baring were named to the Academic Honor Roll.

Bruner Earns MBA Degree at Northwest

The Office of the Registrar and the Graduate School at Northwest Missouri State University have released the names of students who completed requirements for degrees at the conclusion of the 2015 fall trimester.

Degree recipients include: bachelor of science (B.S.), bachelor of science in education (B.S. Ed.), bachelor of technology (B.T.), bachelor of arts (B.A.), bachelor of fine arts (B.F.A.), master of science (M.S.), bachelor of science in clinical laboratory sciences (B.S. CLS), bachelor of science in medical technology (B.S. MT), master of arts (M.A.), master of business administration (M.B.A.), master of science in education  (M.S. Ed.), and education specialist (Ed. Spec.)

Alex Newly Bruner of Downing received his Master’s of Business Administration degree.

Behind the Lens – How To Take A Picture Perfect Self Portrait

by Taylor Lloyd

Let’s face it. Pictures are the best… and the worst. A picture is so unique in that it has the power to transport you back in time to a place filled with fond memories or more often (for me anyway) it can evoke embarrassment (did I really wear that? What on earth was I thinking!?). For better or worse though, pictures are often treasured keepsakes and while I’m strictly more of a nature/ landscape photographer, even I understand the importance of a good portrait. For this reason, I’ll share with you a few tips on how to look your best when it comes to taking your own portrait.

(1) Remember what your trying to capture. While I believe that the difference between a Selfie and a self portrait is that the latter is more thoughtful and time consuming, Self portraits can be anything you want them to be (I mean come on. You’re in charge). They can be a means to capture a flattering authentic image of yourself or an artistic impression of who you aspire to be. They can be goofy or business oriented. Whatever the case may be, being focused on what you are trying to convey in the first place will most certainly improve your portrait.

(2) To achieve flattering portraits (either on you or someone else) is to know what is your best side or angle or features you possess. One thing I strongly believe in is when a face is turned slightly, it will be more flattering than looking squarely straight at the face. The reason being is that an angle gives the appearance of depth and causes the viewer to be more engaged and intrigued in your photo.

(3) Having good lighting is key to creating good portraits. Though take this tip with a grain of salt, though, because everyone has their own opinions on what looks good, for some like to play with other lighting elements to create different feelings. But good lighting will enhance details. With good lighting it is also important to let the light brighten your face. You will want to be having the light source facing you, otherwise you’ll end up with shadows or patchy splotches of sunlight covering your face. Inversely, don’t overexpose your face in the light or else you’ll be squinting and look washed out in the harsh light. Photographing on a cloudy day usually produces great lighting because the clouds act like a giant diffuser, making the sun’s light less intense and more evenly dispersed.

(4) For beginners, starting to shoot yourself at eye level, if not slightly above, is a good angle to start with and having your eyes on the top third of your photo is generally more visually pleasing. More times than not, the eyes are the first thing you notice on a person and with that being said, always make sure the eyes are in focus when taking pictures. Catchlights (the light source you see reflected in the eyes of your subject) are also something that is pleasing to capture in the eyes because it captures the life or spark in a person.

(5) Just like in horror movies, always be aware of what’s behind you. Instead of monsters, it’s the background that should concern you. Background as much as lighting plays an important role in your self portraits. A background that’s not out of focus enough or is too bright distracts the viewer from the main subject and thus loses the point of taking the photograph in the first place. Also be conscious of what you are wearing. Wrinkles or an upturned collar on a shirt can make a photo look sloppy. Unless this is your goal, give yourself a once over before snapping the picture.

(6) Where you position yourself will direct the rest of your photo. It is wise to never crop your pictures right on the joints of your subjects. Your goal should be to elongate and flatter the body and when you crop at the knees, ankles, toes, fingers, elbows, waist, neck, and wrists can make a person look rather stumpy. A good question to ask yourself when you crop (whether in camera or in photo editing) is, “does this look deliberate or does it look like a mistake?”

(7) Don’t be afraid to use props in your photos. Mirrors especially can make an image even more interesting. Holding a mug full of steaming coffee, or a full wine glass for example, will help give the picture a certain mood. Using a prop to stand in your place while you prefocus for your shot is also very useful if you have no other means by which to prefocus.

(8) My final tip is a bit more on the technical side but it might be the most handy. Use a tripod and also put your camera on timer mode. It is also wise to use Continuous Mode (or Burst Mode as some call it). Continuous shooting Mode isn’t just something that DSLRs have – most point and shoot cameras have it as an option also. This mode allows you to take multiple pictures as the shutter button is pressed down instead of the usual single shot you would otherwise get. There are a few variations to this mode, one of them being that your camera has a set amount of pictures it will take in an allotted time. This allotted amount of time is determined by how long of a shutter speed you have. For example, if you have the camera set on Continuous Mode and your shutter is set for a one second exposure, your camera will take the picture for that length of time and then take another photo for the same length of time. Continuous Mode is a great tool when combined with the timer mode. It gives you enough time to get into place and it will take multiple pictures, leaving you with several photos to choose from. Another great tool to throw into this combination is a remote. I have a cheap ($10 off Amazon) remote that has been an excellent device to own and I use it more often than I imagined I would. The reason I love my remote so much is it reduces camera shake when you are taking long exposures and it is also helpful for when you are in position for your portrait and you can’t move from your predetermined spot to press the shutter button down. Another excellent function of the remote is that if your camera is on Auto Focus, using the remote will focus the camera for you, which is crucial when you lack props to take your place where you will stand.

Self portraits can be quite addicting and each one can be vastly different from the last with just a few alterations. Armed with these simple tips, I hope you can better hone your skills at taking self portraits and have fun doing so. Until next time, happy shooting!

Construction Projects Lead Agenda at February City Council Meeting

construction

While the current cold spell may not make it seem like it, the Memphis City Council worked the through its February 4th meeting agenda under the premise that spring is just around the corner. And with the improving weather comes the start of construction season.

The board of aldermen discussed a number of proposed projects being considered for the 2016 construction season.

City Superintendent Roy Monroe reported ongoing legal work surrounding possible ramifications of a joint effort between the city and private property owners adjacent to the municipal light end power plants for the proposed construction of a flood levee.

The partnership idea was born out of shared interests in protecting property that currently is threatened by canal flooding at the west city limits of Memphis, on the north side of Highway 136.

Initially the city was considering construction of a concrete berm surrounding the power plant’s new substation. After learning that adjacent landowners were considering building an earthen levy on the west side of their properties and along the north/south boundary between these properties and the city’s water and power plants,  the parties met to discuss a possible partnership.

Initial discussions were had between the city and the property owners about the possibility of completing an earthen levy along the western borders of the private property and continuing the length of the city property.

Such a proposal would eliminate the need of the private property owners building the levy on the north border of their properties, and would also eliminate the need for the city to build the concrete retaining wall around the substation, which would represent significant savings for the city.

Preliminary discussions between the city and the landowners have centered around initial costs as well as maintenance responsibilities moving forward.

Monroe reported additional concerns have risen regarding potential liability generated by such a levee if flooding occurs on non-protected land on the other side of the canal.

The council asked Monroe to continue to seek legal advice regarding such liability issues, working with the Corp of Engineers and other resources to establish options for moving forward with the project.

PARK BUILDINGS

Monroe reported progress working with the local Boy Scouts as well as the American Legion regarding the possibility of restoring a community building at Legion Park. Such a structure had existed for many years before its deteriorating condition had forced its removal more than a decade ago.

The project is still in the planning stages and will be dependent upon available funding from all three partners.

A proposed shelter and new restrooms at Johnson Park has hit a snag, as grant funding for the project was denied by the Department of Natural Resources.

Monroe reported the City of Memphis was one of 16 applicants for grant funding, and one of just four that did not receive funding.

Last season, the city had placed portable restrooms at the site, but the city will now look into constructing some form of temporary restrooms, with the possibility of later moving the building and using it for storage if and when funding is secured for the larger shelter/restroom project.

MOWER BIDS

The council opened bids for the purchase of two new commercial zero-turn mowers and three commercial-grade trimmers. The low bid of $4,500 was accepted from The Farm Shop, Inc. of Edina for two 2016 EXMARK mowers with 60″ deck and 27HP Kohler engines, and three RedMax Trimmers. The bid price included trade in of two 61″ SCAG mowers.

Bids were also received from Wiss & Wiss Equipment of  Kahoka, Armstrong Tractor, LLC of Donnellson, IA and Garden Spot in Edina.

AIRPORT

Continued maintanence issues with the airport beacon have led to preliminary discussions regarding replacing the lighting system that identifies the airstrip to planes in the air. Preliminary cost estimates ranged from $4,000 to $10,000 to replace the beacon, which is believed to be the original installed in the 1970s.

The airport committee will work on a proposal to be presented to the council at a later date.

Scotland County Hospital Admissions & Dismissals

Scotland County recorded 26 admissions and 26 dismissals from January 29 through February 8, 2016.

ADMISSIONS: 1/31/2016 – Joseph L. Young, Kahoka 2/01/16 – Angela Wiley, Bloomfield, IA; Chyanne Popp, Lancaster; Gracelynn Popp, Lancaster; Jase James Wiley, Bloomfield, IA 2/02/16 – Ashton Pruett, Wayland; Tara Pruett, Wayland 2/05/16 – Roxie B. Miller, Memphis

DISMISSALS: 1/29/16 -Shelby Garrett, Lancaster; Aidyn Lynnae Jackson, Lancaster 2/3/16 – Chyanne Popp, Lancaster; Gracelynn Popp, Lancaster; Angela Wiley, Bloomfield, IA; Jase J. Wiley, Bloomfield, IA 2/4/16 – Tara Pruett, Wayland; Ashton Pruett, Wayland 2/5/16 – Joseph L Young, Kahoka 2/6/16 – Roxie B. Martin, Memphis

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