October 18, 2001

Scotland County Raceway Letter to the Editor

From: Ron Anderson

Promoter Scotland County

Raceway

To: All Racers, Spectators, Race Sponsors and Interested Parties

It has been my pleasure to work with you during the 2001 race season.

I thank all the sponsors for the financial support and confidence in a first year race program.

I thank the racers for their patience while we were getting our staff and facility organized, and for continuing to support the track verbally and with their presence during the race year.

I thank the spectators for supporting the track with their presence and for their kind words of encouragement.

I am very disappointed by my failure, after numerous attempts, to even obtain a meeting to discuss the future of the raceway with the Scotland County Fair Board. As with any lessor/lessee arrangement a certain amount of disagreement and/or discord between the parties may exist. However try as I may, I have been unable to create a reasonable constructive negotiation between myself and the Fair Board.

I honored my commitment to build a program. We have a great race program, certainly with room for improvement but as good or better than most tracks in the tri-state area. We have had some of the most exciting late model racing in the country. (Where else do you see four wide racing at 100 MPH for almost an entire lap)? We have had sprint car racing at 110 MPH. Some of the best A modified racers in the country (and they are local guys), not to mention great B modified, hobby stock, stock car and two man cruiser action.

I am at this time sharing with you the offer I was never able to discuss with the Scotland County Fair Board for the promotion of the Raceway for next year and the significant future. It follows:

What I wanted:

1. A 10-year lease on the Raceway; (from West Side of the gravel road directly behind the grandstand to the fence at Highway 15. From the ditch at the north end of the Raceway to the fence before Lake Road at the South of the Raceway), and one quonset hut. This lease would of course require certain performance criteria, i.e. number of races per year, certain maintenance requirements, etc.

2. Control of all functions that happen on the raceway. (I'll be happy to cooperate with the Fire Department for the Demo Derby and the Fair Board for tractor pulls, etc.)

3. Exclusive rights to solicit and market racing sponsorships and race advertising for the raceway.

4. Have permission to build and/or make improvements as required on the leased property (at my own expense of course).

5. Have all rights to vendor selection and product sales at the raceway.

6. Parking rights on the fairgrounds at no additional charge for all promoted events.

7. Untreated water as required at no charge.

8. Sewage disposal on a regular scheduled basis.

What I was willing to give:

1. I would have agreed to invest a minimum of $20,000.00 dollars in improvements to the raceway as my lease payment in 2002. (I would however, have the final decision on what improvements are made).

2. During the 2nd through the 10th years, I would have agreed to invest a minimum of $5,000.00 per year in improvements to the raceway in addition to $300.00 in payment to the Scotland County Fair Board for each week in which an event is promoted and held, as lease payment.

3. I would have agreed to do all maintenance on the raceway, on the grandstands (once they were brought to a serviceable state), and on the leased grounds.

4. I would of course be responsible for all utilities used by the Raceway.

The Raceway would still belong to the County and after the ten-year lease period the improved property could be leased to the highest bidder.

I believe this was a fair and equitable offer that would have allowed this promoter the freedom to invest in the raceway long term, the county to get a much improved facility, and the community to enjoy a quality race program as well as the revenue it would have generated for local establishments.

I made a request for a special Fair Board meeting to discuss this proposal during a special Fair Board meeting in August and stated this was an urgent matter that needed to be addressed quickly. I made numerous additional requests for a meeting in August to discuss this proposal and additional requests in September. At the end of September I was given the attached lease to sign. On Monaday the 15th of October, I spoke with the president of the Scotland County Agricultural and Mechanical Society, Phil Aylward, at which time he stated to me "there is very little wiggle room in which to negotiate" the lease.

This lease was created with no input from the promoter and is totally unacceptable with no room for the promoter to grow a program or to invest in the raceway with any reasonable expectation of return. Without a multiple year contract and the opportunity for growth and investment, continuing to try to build a quality race program is futile.

As the Fair Board pointed out in their September 13th article in the Memphis Democrat, "The promoter, whoever he is, must look at promoting weekly racing, as a business". Maybe they should consider how much money a race program brings into other community businesses and how many promoters are standing in line to accept this kind of lease.

Also attached you will find the original 2001 agreement which you will see has a first option to renew which has not been honored because the terms and conditions have been changed.

I apologize to the racers, sponsors, spectators, and community for not being able to continue and grow the program we all worked to build, but at this time I must reject this lease and again apologize for my failure to create a constructive negotiation and dialog with the Fair Board.

Proposed New

Lease For Raceway



This Lease is made and entered into this _________ day of ________________ , 2001, by and between Scotland County Agricultural and Mechanical Society, hereinafter referred to as Lessor, and R.L. Anderson, hereinafter referred to as Lessee, with reference to the Scotland County Raceway, hereinafter referred to the Raceway.

The parties hereto, for and in consideration of the rents, covenants and agreements contained herein agree as follows:

1. PREMISES. That Lessor hereby leases to Lessee and Lessee hereby takes from Lessor the premises described as the Scotland County Raceway track, pit area, parking lot, north food stand, south food stand, public bathrooms, bathrooms in art hall and office area in art hall building. The parties hereby acknowledge that the Quonset huts and all other areas of the Scotland County Fair Grounds are excluded from said Agreement.

The Lessor and Lessee agree that Lessee shall have NO SPRINT CAR RACES AT THE RACEWAY.

Lessee will have exclusive rights to solicit and market racing sponsorships and race advertising at the Scotland County Raceway for the period of the Agreement.

2. SCOTLAND COUNTY FAIR. Lessor and Lessee hereby agree that Lessor shall regain exclusive use of all areas of the Scotland County Fairgrounds including racetrack, pit area, parking lot, north food stand, south food stand, public bathrooms, bathrooms in art hall and office area in art hall building for the week of the Scotland County Fair. Parties hereby agree that the Lessor during this period of time will utilize the track for tractor pulls, demolition derby, entertainment, or any other purposes at the sole discretion of the Lessor. The parties further agree that the Lessor will have until the Wednesday following the completion of the Scotland County Fair to clean up the racetrack and pit area.

Lessee will commit to provide two (2) separate nights of racing events during the Scotland County Fair Week. Neither race will be on the Saturday of the Scotland County Fair. All concessions and beer from these two (2) events will be payable to the Lessor. Lessee shall pay the purse, put on the races, get the proceeds from the grandstand and pit admissions.

The parties further agree that the Lessor shall have exclusive use of the racetrack, pit area, parking lot, north food stand, south food stand, public bathrooms, bathrooms in art hall and office area in art hall building during the Scotland County Antique Fair for purpose of holding the Antique Tractor Pull. Said date to be set by Lessor.

3. RENT. During the Lease Term, Lessee shall pay Lessor rent for the leased property in the amount of Six Hundred Dollars ($600.00) per event sponsored by Lessee or held at the Scotland County Raceway. Said payment will be payable on the last day of the month. The parties agree that Three Hundred Dollars ($300.00) of this rental will be paid directly to the Fairboard account. The parties further agree that Three Hundred Dollars ($300.00) of this rental shall be placed into an account for the material for maintenance and materials for grandstand repair or other general capital improvement. No labor charges can be made against this amount. Lessee hereby agrees to present a financial statement to the Scotland County Fairboard at least monthly itemizing his expenditures out of said account.

All mowing of the entire leased premises shall be at Lessees expense and shall be Lessees responsibility.

4. TERM. Subject to either termination as hereinafter provided, the initial term of this lease shall be for the period commencing on April 1, 2002 and ending on October 31, 2002.

5. UTILITIES. The Lessee shall pay all charges for water, electricity, gas and telephone used during the term of this Lease.

6. DEPOSIT. The Lessor and Lessee agree that Lessee shall pay to Lessor a deposit of Five Thousand ($5,000.00) cash to be held in an interest bearing account (interest payable to Lessee if Lessee complies with all the terms and condition of this Agreement). The Five Thousand Dollars shall be payable as follows: Two Thousand Five Hundred ($2,500.00) payable on or before October 15, 2001 and Two Thousand Five Hundred ($2,500.00) payable on or before March 1, 2002.

Said Deposit shall be returned to Lessee if Lessee has a minimum of twelve (12) separate evenings of racing events between April 1, 2002 and October 31, 2002; if Lessee pays all water, electric, phone or other bills incurred by Lessee; and if Lessee repairs all damages and does all required maintenance to the leased premises.

If Lessee fails to fulfill any of the above conditions, the Deposit shall be reduced by the amount of said bill or maintenance cost. If Lessee fails to hold twelve (12) separate evenings of racing events between April 1, 2002 and October 31, 2002 then said deposit shall be taxed Six Hundred Dollars ($600.00) for each evening of racing less than the agreed upon twelve (12).

Within thirty days after the termination of this Lease Lessor hereby agrees to return Lessee's deposit, or to provide Lessee with a written itemized list of damages, bills or other charges for which the deposit or any portion thereof is withheld, along with the balance of the deposit; and further, to give the Lessee written notice of the time and date of the inspection of premises to determine the amount of the security deposit to be withheld. Lessor shall send all notice, payments and statements to the Lessee's address as set forth in this Agreement.

7. MAINTENANCE. Lessee agrees to maintain and operate the Scotland County Raceway and keep the same in good repair. Lessee may at his own costs and expense erect or install other permanent fixtures on said Leased premises with the advanced written approval of Lessor. Lessee agrees that any such improvements become the property of Lessor without contribution from Lessor.

Lessee agrees to return the premises in as good as repair and condition as at the time of the signing of this Lease.

8. RIGHT TO TERMINATE. Either party may terminate this Lease at any time by giving the other party written notice thereof at least ninety (90) days before the termination date.

9. LESSOR'S RIGHT OF ACCESS. Lessor shall have the right to enter the leased property and inspect it at any time. Lessee shall provide one (1) ticket for pit or grandstand entry per event per Scotland County Agricultural and Mechanical Society board member at no cost to said member.

10. OTHER INDEMNIFI-CATION. During the Lease Term, Lessee assumes all risks relating to the Leased Property normally associated with ownership of such Property, including personal injury claims. Lessee shall be responsible for any damages to the Leased Property occurring during the Lease Term which are not caused by the negligence of Lessor or Lessor's agents. Further, Lessee agrees to indemnify and hold Lessor harmless from any liability, demand, action, claim, loss cost, penalty, fine, clean-up expense or other expense of any kind or character including, but not limited to, reasonable attorneys' fees of Lessor, relating to such assumed risks or arising out of Lessee's use or occupancy of the leased Property during the Lease Term. Lessee shall also have Lessor listed as a coinsured on his race insurance policy.

11. MISCELLANEOUS. Lessee agrees to keep all track equipment in the pit area and not on the fair grounds. Lessee shall keep all fuel in containers which meet the Department of Natural Resources Regulations and under containment in the pit area.

Lessee and Lessor agree that Lessee shall do the following:

a. Promote and market all races in a professional and business like manner.

b. Hire all paid employees (approximately 25) from the surrounding area.

c. Hire local organizations for facility cleanup, (ie Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, 4H).

d. Provide a family oriented race venue including some events for children.

e. Repair any damage caused during a promoted event.

f. Be responsible for track maintenance, concessions, rest rooms, and trash removal for all promoted events.

g. Be responsible for utilities and insurance for all promoted events.

h. Pay all race purses.

12. NOTICE

(a) In the event any notices are to be given to Lessor, they shall be addressed to:

Phil Aylward,

President Scotland County

Agricultural and Mechanical

Society

Rt. 2 Box 144

Memphis, MO 63555



With a copy to Lessor's attorney:

Kimberly J. Nicoli

133 S. Main Street

Memphis, MO 63555

and deposited in the United States Mail, Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested, postage prepaid.

(b) In the event any notices are to be given to Lessee, they shall be addressed to:

R.L. Anderson

232 Prime Street

Downing, MO 63536

And deposited in the United States Mail, Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested, postage prepaid.

(c) For the purposes hereof, the date of mailing shall be deemed to be the date notice is given.

13. ASSIGNMENT OF LEASE. Lessee shall not at any time assign this lease or any part thereof without the consent in writing of Lessor.

14. CANCELLATION OF LEASE. This agreement is made upon the express condition that Lessor shall not be liable for any loss, damages, injuries, or other casualties of whatever kind or by whomever caused to the property or person of another, whether the person or property of Lessee, its agents or employees, or third persons, occasioned by any cause(s) whatsoever, including failure of lessor to keep the premises in repair or any other acts of negligence by lessor, while in or upon the premises, or any part of the premises, during the term of this agreement or occasioned by any occupancy or use of the premises or any activity carried on by Lessee in connection with the lease of the premises, and Lessee covenants and agrees to indemnity and save harmless Lessor from all liabilities, charges expenses (including counsel fees) and costs on account of or by reason of any such injuries, liabilities, claims, suits or losses, however occurring, or damages growing out of same.

Original Lease

Agreement



Agreement

R.L. Anderson proposes to market and promote all racing at the Scotland County Raceway. This commitment would be for a minimum of but not limited to twelve race dates starting in May 2001 and ending in September 2001. The classes of cars to be raced will be determined at a future date after meeting with area drivers and car owners. Classes will be discussed with the fair board, with the promoter of the races having the final decision. I will commit to race one night of late mods on Wednesday, July 4th, 2001 and one night of sprint cars on Thursday, July 5th, 2001, during Fair week. In addition R.L. Anderson agrees to relinquish one Saturday in September to the Antique Fair. All other Saturdays between the beginning of May and the End of September are reserved for and committed to the race promoter R.L. Anderson.

R.L. Anderson agrees and commits to the following:

* To promote and market all races in a professional and business like manner.

* To hire all paid employees (approximately 25) from the surrounding area.

* To hire local organizations for facility cleanup, (ie Boys Scouts, Girls Scouts, 4H).

* To provide a family oriented race venue including some events for children.

* To repair any damage caused during a promoted event, less normal wear and tear.

* To be responsible for track maintenance, concessions, rest rooms, and trash removal for all promoted events.

* To be responsible for utilities and insurance for all promoted events.



Budget and Expenses

* R.L. Anderson agrees to provide the Scotland County fair board a security deposit of $2,000 to be deposited in an interest bearing trust account prior to the start of racing. This deposit to be refundable at the end of the lease if any damage caused to the facilities, less normal wear and tear, is repaired.

* R.L. Anderson agrees to pay the Scotland County fair board $500 per week for any week in which a race is promoted and raced, except for events canceled and/or rescheduled because of inclement weather or other unavoidable condition.

* All concessions sales and vendor selection (both pit and spectator side) will be exclusively R.L. Anderson, for all events promoted by the same. Spectator side concession sales will be conceded to the Scotland County fair board during the week of the County Fair, and during the Antique Fair.

* R.L. Anderson will have exclusive rights to solicit and market racing sponsorships and race advertising at the Scotland County Raceway for the period of the agreement.

* R.L. Anderson will pay all race purses.



History

I would require the historical race data i.e. racers names, addresses, phone numbers, and/or any past mailing lists from the Scotland County fair board as well as any other historical information that might be relevant.



Future

* If R.L. Anderson fulfills the commitments as stated in this proposal/contract the Scotland County fair board agrees to give R.L. Anderson first option to renew this lease for additional years at rates not to exceed a 20% increase for any single year.



By our signatures below we agree to be bound by the terms and conditions listed above.

R.L. Anderson, Promoter

11-29-00



Phil Aylward, Fair Board President

11-29-00

Descendants of Original Pioneers Pay Visits to Scotland, Schuyler Counties

Henry Hawkins Downing, II descendants recently gathered to explore Scotland and Schuyler counties where their ancestor was one of the original pioneers settling in the region. Photo by Abby Fincher.

by Barbara Blessing

On August 14 and 15, 2017, descendants of pioneer settlers converged on northeast Missouri to view the origins of their predecessors. Henry Hawkins Downing I and his wife Airy Hitch Downing were joined by five of their seven children to make the 1,000 mile trek to Missouri in 1834. Included with the five journeying to Missouri was our ancestor Henry Hawkins Downing II.  The other four children were Harriet Green Smoot, Martha Acton Briggs, Amanda Melvina Williams, and William G. Downing.  A sister, Sarah Ann Downing Hudnall, with her family, soon joined the Missouri contingent.  The only one to remain in Virginia was son John Hitch Downing.  Together with their families, they made the trek from Virginia to settle on the frontier.  While they had no wealth when they left Faquier County, Virginia, through industry and hard work, they were soon landowners and prominent businessmen.

Henry H. Downing II had nine children: namely, John Alexander, Rhoda Ann, William Green, Mary Etta, Amanda D., Harriet (Hattie) Ann, Henry Hawkins III, James M, and Jennie Valiant.  The descendants of John Alexander, Rhoda Ann and Jennie Valiant were present for the reunion.  Those attending were Bill Cox, Rebekah Cox Fish, Jennie Downing Cox, Mel Cox, Abby Cox Fincher, and matriarch Melba Cox from the Jennie Valiant Nelson family.  Those attending from John Alexander’s family were Kathleen Downing de Izaguirre, Indiana Lugo Downing and Emma Lugo Downing, Maria Downing de Villa, Martha and Frank Fair, Pearl Gizzarelli, Vivian B. Najarra,  Sergio and Maria Zamora, and Maria Downing,   Those present from Rhoda’s family were Henry Hawkins Blessing and his wife Barbara, Marilyn Blessing and her husband Roy Blessing, Jr., Jim Bruner, Louise Newland, and  SC researcher Joanne Aylward who had helped Mr. and Mrs. Cox during a previous visit.  The descendants attending currently live in New Jersey, California, Kansas, Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Nicaragua, and Venezuela.

Bill Cox and his late wife Teresia have done extensive research on our family’s origins.  On Monday, he presented a notebook to everyone detailing some of the information they have gleaned from years of study.  We left the fellowship hall of the Downing Christian Church to go to the Downing Family Cemetery located on land owned now by Henry H. Blessing II, another descendant of Rhoda’s.  We visited at the recently renovated site and took pictures.  Then we journeyed to the James Garnett home to visit the place of the original homestead of Henry H. Downing II.  There have been years of change, but there remains the cistern and a depression in the ground where the cellar was originally and then filled in.  After lunch at Keith’s, we went to the Downing House Museum built by Henry’s brother, William G. Downing to view artifacts, history, and memorabilia from Scotland County.

The Downing House Museum hosted the group of Henry Hawkins Downing descendants during their visit to Memphis. Photo by Jennie Cox.

The Scotland County Genealogical Society presented us with folders of information from their files.  They also hosted a reception at their building and served refreshments in honor of Miss Indiana Lugo Downing’s 77th birthday.  We then went to view the square where Mr. John Alexander Downing, upon returning to America from Nicaragua, established a business.  His father Henry II had deeded him three lots with a house where they resided during their brief sojourn in America before returning to Nicaragua to finally establish their permanent home.

We went to the Scotland County Library where we viewed the resources that were available for genealogy study.

On Tuesday, we reconvened at the Fellowship Hall of the Downing Christian Church before going to the Downing Museum where we were hosted by volunteers Judy Sharp and Jerry Scurlock.  Several pictures were taken and visiting continued.  We then went to the Winn Hill Bed and Breakfast to view a typical 1850’s home where the brick were kilned on the property.  After a fantastic meal and more visiting and picture-taking, several had to depart to catch planes to return to their homes.  The Cox family went to the Dover Cemetery to view the resting places of Colonel John William and Rhoda Priest and their descendants and then to Henry and Barbara’s home to view the Middle Fabius grist stone, the site of the presumed Rhoda Downing Priest’s home, and other artifacts.

We are indebted to the Genealogical Society, Curators of the Downing House Museum, Rhonda McBee, Lynette Dyer, and Anna Lynn Kirkpatrick, the Childresses for opening their Winn Hill B&B home for touring and dining, Melissa Schuster of the SC Library (who is herself a Downing descendant), Mr. Garnett and Henry Blessing II for access to their land, The Downing Christian Church for use of their fellowship hall, and to Ronnie Tinkle for refurbishing the family cemetery.

“I am bound to them, though I cannot look into their eyes or hear their voices, I honor their history.  I cherish their lives.  I will tell their story.  I will remember them.”  Author Unknown

 

Summer Winding Down

School starting, no way. Both of our youngest grandsons, Kameron and Russ are in their last year of preschool. Several of our older grandkids have taken off to college.  Times passes quickly.

I hope you all have had a good summer and enjoyed being with kids and grandkids. I have managed a couple of road trips with mine. In July we went to Beach Ottumwa for a day of water fun, and in August we had a fantastic day at Hannibal seeing the sights downtown, and lunch, then on to the cave.

I think Russ has been intrigued with Mark Twain. He listened intensively to several guides explaining Mark Twain days, and was able to see an impersonator of Mark Twain. He asked a lot of questions also. Fun times. I was talking to Kayla relative to calling my phone company, being Mark Twain Rural Telephone Co.  I said I called Mark Twain, and Russ turned around, quite wide eyed and said Granny did you talk to Mark Twain?  So very cute.

Recently, I don’t know  about all of you, but I have been making a lot of hummingbird food. I so enjoy watching them close up. I always say I am going to hold a feeder in my lap some morning and see if they will feed right from there. I make at least 4-6 cups per day.  Hungry little feathered friends need energy.

The wrens on the front porch are almost ready to fly and most birds on the trails are tending their young and teaching them what they will need to know for the winter months ahead. The Robins have sure quieted down. I love fall, but hate to see the hummingbirds leave in early October and all the other visitors get ready for winter.

My bluebirds took a hit this summer from the raccoons.  I tried a lot of things but some of them went down due to nest compromise.  I know that many of us need rain. We were able to get an inch here this last week, and close by 2.2 inches. Much needed.  My lawn mower has had a rest.

You should be seeing some American Gold Finches right now at your feeder, still colored in their best yellow suits. Enjoy the rest of the summer, and until next time, good bird watching.

We Must Not Let Religion Get In The Way Of Christ-ianity 

The four gospels are consistent with repetitive pattern; religion and Jesus do not mix. This. Is. Their. Message. Of. Which. We. Are. Still. Learning.

The church, which is to be the body of Christ on earth today, has a fierce ongoing battle which must be faced.  Yet, basic indifference has transpired.  The light has gone out in much of the spiritual terrain for the Son of God has been placed by a religious ego of sorts known as “we do church right”.

We are in desperate need for the Spirit of God to awaken us.  Awaken us; not the unbelieving world, not the thieves and robbers and swindlers…but us!  A growing picture is developing in far too many places which replicates the garden scene; Jesus praying while the disciples tip over in contented slumber.

Religion puts one to sleep in the midst of the very process of vital activity.  The constant repeating of acts of worship gradually becomes that which is worshipped…. not God…. in all religions.  Christ-ianity, on the other hand, is vibrant with anticipatory enthusiasm for the worshipper senses a reality of one’s spirit connected to the reality of One’s Spirit.

Imagination becomes fascinated as the heart engages in bringing God honor.  One at this juncture has no taste for going through the church motions.  The craving for the Higher cannot be satisfied by the habits of the Lower.

Religion is all about motions.  We call a portion of it “acts of worship”.  The question for us is, “Are we genuinely, actually, actively worshipping God?”  Indeed, this accomplishment is rewarding, renewing, and rebuilding.  We must praise something (Someone) bigger than ourselves.  Otherwise, we will continually be watching the one(s) better than us… and such a one(s) will eventually have a clay foot fall off.

It is a daily call, I believe, because it is a daily war to not let religion get in the way of Christ-ianity.  I preached Bible too many years without preaching the Christ of the Bible.  I had my slants, my perspectives, and my applauded/lauded stances; all the while, Jesus was not the centerpiece of ministry and labor.  May we gain new momentum and then renewed momentum day by day.

Christ is to be the key in the term Christ-ianity.  Religion and Jesus do not mix; but, oh how we still try to make the two fit into our preferred forms.

WE MUST NOT LET RELIGION GET IN THE WAY OF CHRIST-IANITY

JAMES “JACK” AARON RUTH (1/12/1940 – 8/13/2017)

A celebration of life service for Jack Ruth, 77, of Brownwood, Texas was held Thursday, August 17 at Victory Life Church under the direction of Heartland Funeral Home. Burial was in Eastlawn Memorial Park.

James “Jack” Aaron Ruth was born in Brownwood, on January 12, 1940, to Wesley Charles Ruth and Ruth Evelyn Ruth. Jack went home to be with the Lord on August 13, 2017.

Jack graduated from Brownwood High School in 1958. While attending Howard Payne College, he managed the Pepsi Cola Bottling Company that his father had founded.

In 1960, he married his best friend and the love of his life, Peggy Joyce Crow, who he adored, and affectionately referred to himself as Mr. Peggy Joyce Ruth.

The highlight of Jack’s life was pastoring Living Word Church (now Victory Life Church) where he became a father to many and developed life-long friendships. He went on to establish a Christian school and radio station. He retired from pastoring in 2005, but not from the ministry. Jack has spent the last 12 years spreading the Good News of the Gospel, counseling and ministering to college students and providing marital counseling.

He enjoyed spending time on the ranch and taking on projects, one of which was the Old Yantis house on Main Street, and was always there to help others along with being a devoted husband, father and grandfather.

Jack is survived by his wife of 57 years, Peggy Joyce Ruth; one daughter, Angelia Schum; one son, William Ruth; and loving grandchildren who he became their “Bumbie,” not to mention numerous relatives, life-long friends and his church family who he loved dearly, and who loved him.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks for donations to Victory Life Academy and Crosslines College Ministry.

Honorary pallbearers were Bo Allen, Robert Johnson, Dr. Henry McGowen, Joe McCluskey, Mike Welch, Herb Waits, Mitch Huser, Gene Reagan, David Patton, Wilson Smith, Steve Brandenburg and Tim Dees.

Condolences can be offered to the family online at heartlandfuneralhome.net.

Scotland County Commission Meeting Minutes

Thursday, August 10, 2017

PLACE OF MEETING: Scotland County Courthouse Commission Chambers

The meeting was called to order at 8:30 a.m.

PRESENT WERE:  Presiding Commissioner: Duane Ebeling; Eastern District Commissioner, Danette Clatt; Western District Commissioner, David Wiggins; Deputy County Clerk, Nancy McClamroch;

Commissioner Wiggins moved to approve the consent agenda; seconded by Commissioner Ebeling. Motion carried 3-0.

Commissioner Clatt moved to approve the minutes from August 9, 2017; seconded by Commissioner Wiggins.  Motion carried 3-0.

The Commission audited and signed checks.

Seeing no further business, Commissioner Ebeling adjourned the meeting at 12:00 p.m.

The Scotland County Commission adjourned to meet in regular session on Wednesday, August 16, 2017.

 

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

PLACE OF MEETING: Scotland County Courthouse Commission Chambers

The meeting was called to order at 8:30 a.m.

PRESENT WERE:  Presiding Commissioner, Duane Ebeling; Eastern District Commissioner, Danette Clatt; Western District Commissioner, David Wiggins was absent; and County Clerk, Batina Dodge.

Commissioner Clatt moved to approve the consent agenda; seconded by Presiding Commissioner Ebeling. Motion carried 2-0.

The minutes from August 10, 2017 were presented. Presiding Commissioner Ebeling moved to approve the regular session minutes; seconded by Commissioner Clatt. Motion carried 2-0.

Presiding Commissioner Ebeling reported that he attended a meeting with FEMA and SEMA Tuesday to review floodplain maps.

The Commission approved invoices 170195-010-5 and 170195-020-5 to SKW for engineering services on Bridges 2170011 and 1600009.

The Commission reviewed budget reported presented by Batina Dodge, County Clerk.

Ryan Clark, Road and Bridge Supervisor, met with the Commission to discuss current projects.

Seeing no further business, Presiding Commissioner Ebeling adjourned the meeting at 12:00 p.m.

The Scotland County Commission adjourned to meet in regular session on Thursday, August 17, 2017.

Living Life Over

FIVE YEARS AGO

A Saturday afternoon fire destroyed a machine shed and all of its contents north of Gorin.  The Scotland County dispatcher received a call at 5:29 p.m. reporting a possible fire on the property, owned by Chad Winters.

The Gorin Fire Department responded to the structure fire call and placed a mutual aid call to the Scotland County Fire Department.

Responding emergency service personnel found the structure fully engulfed in flames.  Crews worked shuttling water from a nearby pond to allow the blaze to be extinguished.

The structure and its contents were a complete loss.  The contents were owned by Brian and Karen Kraus and Robert and Joni Kraus.  The fire destroyed two tractors, a baler, a 1979 Ford pickup, shop tools and some personal belongings that were being stored in the building.

The fire department indicated the blaze likely started in one of the tractors, which had been used prior to the blaze.

TEN YEARS AGO

Seven people from northeast Missouri and southeast Iowa recently traveled to Texcoco, Mexico, just outside of Mexico City, to work with Adrian Sanchez and his church plant.

The travelers were Martha Parish, Tom Owings, Dr. Celeste Miller-Parish, Jierra Woods, BethAnn Shewmaker, Justin DeVries, and Barri Hoffman.

The group assisted in a four-day vacation Bible school while in Mexico.  The volunteers also assisted their host community, doing multiple painting and carpentry jobs.

While in Mexico, the mission group had the opportunity to visit the pyramids, The Temple of the Sun and The Temple of the Moon.

20 YEARS AGO

An early morning fire destroyed a hay barn and caused extensive damage to an adjoining milking building at the Leon Horst residence on Route T near Bible Grove.

The Scotland County Fire Department was called to the scene at approximately 5:15 a.m August 21st.  At least a dozen firemen responded to the call, taking four fire trucks to the scene.  Upon arrival at the scene the hay barn was totally consumed by fire.  The firemen focused their work on saving the milking building.

Hose teams concentrated their efforts on the concrete building where as many as four hose teams attempted to stop the spread of the flames.

Through the combined efforts of both the Scotland County Fire Department and the Rutledge Fire Department, the fire was eventually brought under control at approximately 7:30 a.m.  They hay barn was totally destroyed, but a large portion of the milking building was saved despite fire damage to the interior.

30 YEARS AGO

If you are traveling within 75 miles of Memphis and you see some strange flashing lights, don’t be alarmed, it is not a UFO! What you are seeing are the lights on the newly constructed TV tower located southwest of Colony.

The tower, erected by KTVO-TV, Kirksville-Ottumwa, IA, is one of the tallest in the United States, and among the tallest in the world.  The 2,000 foot tower, equipment and anchors cover 160 acres of land. Seven levels of strobe lights, with a total of 19 lights, can be seen for miles.

The tower was built to increase the number of viewers.  The estimated cost of the construction is 1.4 million dollars.  It is expected to attract a viewing audience of a 150 mile radius.

40 YEARS AGO

Sunday, August 28th, the Memphis Pool is having a water basketball game.  There will be half-time entertainment.  It will be free to the public.

Immediately following the game the pool will be open to the public as usual.

At 4 p.m. a dance contest will be held.  The winning couple will receive two adult passes to the Airway Drive-In or dinner for two at B & B Snack Bar.

After the Dance Contest, watermelon games and a drawing for Pepsi will be enjoyed.

50 YEARS AGO

A new class in Drafting has been placed into the curriculum at the high school and will be taught by Duane McDonald.  Physics is being offered this year and will be taught by Mrs. Sheryl Pringle.  A third course added to the curriculum is clerical practice which will be offered on a double period basis and will be taught by Mrs. Betty Smith.

Typing this year is being opened to sophomores on a limited basis.  A summer class of typing helped to make it possible to have more in the fall class for additional students.

60 YEARS AGO

About 35 consignors met at the Fairgrounds Tuesday and built another sorting alley and row of holding pens for the Scotland County Producers Association.

This new equipment will make it possible to handle more cattle in a shorter time than has been done in the past.

This year’s cooperative sale will be held on September 30th.  Those beef cattle producers who plan to consign calves for the 1957 sale should list them very soon at the extension office as listings may be closed at any time.

The Scotland County sale was at the top of all Missouri sales last year in average selling prices.

70 YEARS AGO

The Gerhold building on the south side of the square, occupied by the E. J. Caldwell Co., will be extended back toward the alley approximately 45 feet.

The new addition will be one story, constructed of concrete blocks and the contract has been let to J. M. Creek.  Work on the building will start within a few days.

Part of the new additions will be used for sales room, enlarging the present room, and the balance will be used for a stock room.  The present stock room is on the second floor.

Carper Set to Take Helm of Tigers Football Program

After seven years with the Scotland County R-I football program Troy Carper is ascending to the head coaching job to lead the Tigers in the 2017 season.

Carper, a special education instructor at SCR-I High School, has moved into the head post after serving the past two years as the team’s defensive coordinator.

“I’ve worked in just about every possible football coaching capacity since I started here,” said Carper. “I coached at the junior high and junior varsity levels as well as the past two years with the varsity program and it all has been great experience.”

The Tigers’ new leader came to the program from his hometown of Palmyra, where he was an all-state offensive lineman for the Panthers before moving on to play at Culver-Stockton College.

Former Coach Mikel Gragg took the head coaching job at California, to move back closer to his home.

Carper will take over a Tigers team that is coming off back-to-back winning seasons, but one with plenty of holes to fill after graduating a talented senior class.

“There are some big shoes to fill for sure, but we have some really talented players returning that should make this a fun season,” he said. “If we can stay healthy I think we’ll be a lot of fun to watch.”

Carper feels a special bond with his senior class, which he coached to an undefeated season as the head junior high coach.

Fans will get their first look as the Tigers this Friday in a pre-season jamboree at Monroe City where SCR-I will play a series of offense and defense versus the Panthers, as well as Schuyler County and Van Far. The action kicks off at 6 p.m.

‘Small But Dedicated’ Roster Looking to Lead Tigers Football to 3rd Straight Winning Season

After riding the talented class of 2017 to back-to-back winning seasons, the Scotland County football program has big shoes, or in this case sets of cleats, to fill heading into the 2017 season. That is not to say that the Tigers don’t have their fair share of talent returning, making a third straight winning season a distinct possibility.

If the Tigers can reach the goal, it will guarantee Coach Troy Carper will have a career mark over .500. Carper enters his first year at the helm of the SCR-I program with his work cut out for him. The first-year head coach will have to replace two all-state stalwarts from his top performing defense a season ago.

As defensive coordinator of last year’s 7-4 squad, Carper witnessed standout performances from defensive back Ryan Slaughter and linebacker Aaron Blessing. The Missouri Football Coaches Association named Slaughter First Team All State after he led the team with 109 tackles and added two interceptions. Blessing earned second taem all-state accolades, finishing second on the squad with 104 tackles.

“Obviously those two are going to be difficult to replace,” said Carper.  “We graduated a very talented class of kids. I’m not sure everyone totally grasps how special that group was.”

But Carper said he has had a talented group of athletes in camp ready to fill those voids.

“We have some really good players, some of them who may have been stuck behind that Class of 2017, who are now going to get a shot to shine,” said Carper.

The problem is, that while the kids who are now stepping up, provided necessary depth in previous seasons, the 2017 Tigers don’t currently have that kind of depth.

“Numbers are going to be an issue,” said Carper. “I like what we are putting on the field, but we are going to have to stay healthy. Our roster is small but it’s dedicated.”

While the new coach says that there are definitely some kids walking the hallways at SCR-I that would have helped the program, he couldn’t be more pleased with the dedication demonstrated by the band of players who have been there since day one.

“Several of the kids came to me and said they wanted to play both offense and defense and that they didn’t want to come out of the game,” said Carper.

The coach explained to the players that his first job was to keep them safe and healthy, and in order to do that, they were going to have to demonstrate a state of conditioning that would allow him to be comfortable to play them more.

“It started right away,” Carper said. “Those kids stayed after practice for voluntary extra conditioning. Then I see them out running around town. Not driving around hanging out, but really running to get into even better shape.”

It’s that type of dedication that has lent itself to hope the Tigers can continue their recent winning ways and maybe even get back to the district title game to erase the sour taste of last year’s 44-42 defeat to Mark Twain.

Quarterback Will Fromm said that loss, which came down to a failed last-second two-point conversion, after a big comeback by SCR-I, is serving as motivation for the current squad.

The junior will take over as the team’s primary signal caller, after seeing time last year at both quarterback and receiver. Fromm completed 43 of 77 passes for 554 yards and seven TDs.

SCR-I’s receiving corps is going to have to develop some new threats after graduating the top three threats. Slaughter led the squad with 24 catches for 432 yards and six TDs. Also gone are Ian See and his 14 grabs for 203 yards, and Aaron Buford, who caught 11 passes for 187 yards and two scores.

Gage Dodge will be the top returning receiver. The senior was third on the team with 12 receptions for 133 yards.

Carper is expecting Brett Monroe and Jace Morrow to step up. Both saw limited time a season ago when Monroe caught five passes for 50 yards and a TD while Morrow had two grabs for 24 yards and a TD. Matthew Woods will also factor into the rotation.

“They are going to be a key to our success,” said Carper. We’re going to have to catch the ball.”

Carper said he hopes to have a balanced attack, passing as much as 50% of the time, with a lot of motion out the pistol sets to move the defensive ends and linebackers around into coverage to try and open up some running lanes.

A veteran offensive line will also play a big part in the team’s success. Starters Stephen Terrill, Bryson Orton and Mason Kliethermes return to anchor the squad, which gelled last year after losing starting center Will Pickerell for the year with a pre-season knee injury. After staring on the defensive line last year, Grant McRobert will move into a starting role on the offensive line as well. Dylan Karch played at various spots on the line a season ago and will take over as a starter in 2017 to replace Blessing.

The rushing attack will have a new look as top rushers Buford and Austin Day have graduated, taking with them a combined 1,450 yards and 18 TDs.

Jayden Payne has been tabbed the starting tailback after being forced into duty in last year’s playoffs due to injuries. He carried the ball 12 times for 57 yards and scored two TDs in the playoffs.

Dodge ran the ball 39 times a year ago for 168 yards and two TDs while Fromm ran the ball 70 times for 273 yards and two TDs.

On the other side of the ball, Terrill will return at defensive end where he amassed 83 tackles as well as three quarterback sacks. Orton is back as the run stopper up the middle where he anchored the defensive line from his tackle spot. McRobert and Karsh will round out the front four in Carper’s base 4-3 defense.

While Blessing’s departure leaves a hole at middle linebacker, Carper said he likes what he has seen thus far in practice from Payne who will slide into that spot, leaving Kliethermes at the outside backer spot where he made 72 tackles a year ago. Luke Triplett and Branton Burrus are battling for the other starting spot.

The defensive backfield is going to be another key to the Tigers’ 2017 outcomes. Carper has to replace all-starter Slaughter as well as Buford and Griffin Kerkmann, Dodge is the lone starter returning.

“The secondary is going to be crucial,” said Carper. “We have a lot of new faces back there, and they are just going to need to get more and more reps to help them identify and make the right reads.”

Monroe and Woods are in the mix with Parker Triplett at the cornerback slot opposite of Dodge, who also could see time at one of the safety spots. Fromm likely will start at one of the safety positions, with Morrow and Kayden Anders also expected to see time there.

Carper said in addition to Anders, fellow freshman Preston Sanchez has been impressive in early workouts, as has newcomer Conner Harrison, as the team works to develop the next wave of talent.

SCR-I will open the season Friday night at home versus Marceline in a Lewis & Clark Conference matchup. The visiting Tigers made it to the second round of the state playoffs a year ago, posting a 12-2 record with a conference title and a perfect 8-0 mark in league play in 2016.

Missouri to Experience First Total Solar Eclipse In Nearly 150 Years

On Monday, August 21st, the state of Missouri will get to experience something the Show-Me State hasn’t seen in nearly a century and a half, a solar eclipse.

Scotland County lies just outside the approximately 70-mile swath the total eclipse will travel across Missouri, entering the state near St. Joseph, crossing Columbia and Jefferson City before hitting Farmington and Cape Girardeau as the phenomenon travels west to east across the United States.

NASA predicts the lunar shadows will start in Oregon at 9:05 a.m. PDT before it exits the U.S. in South Carolina after 4 p.m. EDT. In the middle, Hopkinsville, KE will view the greatest eclipse, at the point where the sun, moon and earth line up the most precisely.

According to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, this will be the first time since August 7, 1869 (148 years ago) a total solar eclipse will be witnessed in Missouri, and that one only crossed the northeast corner of the state.

The last total eclipse in the United States was viewed February 26, 1979, with the last total eclipse to cross the entire U.S. dating back to June 8, 1918, according to NASA.

“This is the first eclipse in almost 100 years that’s covering the entire country and that’s going to be a game changer for eclipse science – both for studying the sun and what’s happening here on Earth,” said Alex Young, Solar Scientist, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.

The national space agency explains that a total solar eclipse happens when the sun, moon and Earth are perfectly aligned, so that the moon blocks all the sun’s light to part of Earth’s surface.

“Total solar eclipses are only possible on Earth because of a celestial coincidence: The moon and the sun both appear to be about the same size from our vantage point on the ground,” explains the NASA press kit. “The sun is about 400 times wider than the moon, but it is also about 400 times farther away. That geometry means that when they line up just right, the moon blocks the sun’s entire surface, creating a total solar eclipse.”

The geometry plays out even further through the two concentric cones that form the moon’s shadow as it passes between the Earth and the sun.

The penumbra is the moon’s faint outer shadow. Observers in the penumbra experience a partial solar eclipse, because the sun is only partially blocked by the moon from their perspective.

The umbra is the moon’s dark inner shadow. Observers in the umbra see a total solar eclipse. The path of the umbra across Earth’s surface, called the path of totality, usually stretches for about 10,000 miles (16,000 kilometers), though it is only about 70 miles (113 kilometers) wide.

It is within this umbra where a total eclipse can be observed. While Scotland County falls just outside the umbra’s path, NASA predicts that Memphis and the surrounding towns in adjoining counties will experience up to 97% obstruction of the sun, beginning around 11:45 a.m. and lasting until after 2:30 p.m. with the highest level of obstruction expected to occur between 1:10 – 1:15 p.m.

“The hair on the back of your neck is going to stand up and you are going to feel different things as the eclipse reaches totality,” said Brian Carlstrom, Deputy Associate Director of the National Park Service Natural Resource Stewardship and Science Directorate. “It’s been described as peaceful, spiritual, exhilarating, shocking. If you’re feeling these things, don’t worry, you’re experiencing the total eclipse of the sun!”

But it won’t last for long, considering the umbra will be traveling some 3,000 mph when it hits Oregon before steadily slowing down as it crosses the U.S. with an exit speed of 1,500 mph in South Carolina.

Experts estimate that more than 12 million Americans live in the path of the eclipse, but are expecting much more people to travel to the region to view the rare occasion. Missouri officials are expecting an influx of more than 1 million tourists for the event and the Missouri Department of Transportation is advising motorists to expect heavy traffic. That number may be even larger than anticipated considering the fact experiencing a solar eclipse where you live happens once every 375 years according to NASA experts.

“This will be like Woodstock 200 times over—but across the whole country.” said Young.

Viewing Safety

The only safe way to look directly at an uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or handheld solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are NOT safe for looking at the sun. It is safe to look at a total eclipse with your naked eyes, ONLY during the brief period of totality, which will last just a minute or two during the Aug. 21 eclipse.

It is NOT safe to look at the sun through the viewfinder of a camera or an unfiltered telescope. You may, however, safely look at the screen of your smart phone or digital camera focused on the eclipse, though you are unlikely to get a good view.

An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed sun is pinhole projection. In this method, you don’t look directly at the sun, but at a projection on a piece of paper or even the ground. For example, cross the outstretched, slightly open fingers of one hand over the outstretched, slightly open fingers of the other. Do not look at your hands, but at the shadow of your hands on the ground. The little spaces between your fingers will project a grid of small images, showing the sun as a crescent during the partial phases of the eclipse. See the appendix for ways of making projectors out of readily available materials such as a cereal box. 3-D printable pinhole projectors of each state available at: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/3dprintable-pinhole-projectors

Food, Fun & Fellowship… Mark Your Calendars For This Year’s Antique Fair!

Tenderloins and BBQ Chicken and Funnel Cakes…Oh My! The 2017 Scotland County Antique Fair will kick off a five-day festival on Wednesday, August 23rd on the Memphis Square.  The theme for this year’s event is “A Walk Down Memory Lane”.

Everyone is invited to attend the Vesper Service at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday and then stick around for the SCR-1 Tailgate Party at 6:30.  The Country Showdown starts at 7:30 p.m.

All displays will open at 9:00 a.m. Thursday, August 24th and stay open until 8:00 p.m.  Displays will be available Thursday thru Saturday and will feature various church and community group stands along with many others.  The Wiggins Museum will also be open every day, ALL day, where the Pheasant Airplane will be on display. Also on Thursday, guests will be able to walk around and view window displays and visit food stands.  The Downing House Museum will be open from 1-4 p.m.  Quilt entries are from 3-7 p.m.

The Thursday evening line-up starts at 6:00 with the crowning of the Antique Fair King and Queen, Baby Show, crowning of the Prince and Princess, and the opening of the Bingo tent.  At 7:30, NO APOLOGY, from Greentop, MO, will provide music on stage.  The evening raffle drawing of $100 will take place at 10:00 p.m.

The fun continues Friday, August 25th with the Show Me Dog Club at 6:00 p.m. and Tractor and Small Engine Judging at 7:00 p.m.  NO APOLOGY will make an encore appearance on stage at 7:30 p.m. and another $100 raffle drawing will take place at 10:00 p.m.  Additionally, a Quilt Show will be available from 2:00-7:00 p.m. in the Coffrin Building and window display results will be announced at 5:30.

You’ll want to get up early Saturday morning and enjoy the Fireman’s Breakfast at the Memphis Fire Station starting at 6:00 a.m.  The 5K Walk/Run and 1.5 Leisure Walk, sponsored by Scotland County Hospital, starts at 8:00 a.m. on the east side of the square, and the Parade will begin at 10:00 a.m.

The Downing/Boyer Houses, Railroad Depot, Barnett WWI Monument and Original Courthouse will all be available to view and tour from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

The Kiddies’ Sanction Pedal Tractor Pull will take place at 11:30 a.m. on the east side of the square.

Immediately following the parade, food stands, including Rotary pork chops and chicken, along with vendors and the Wiggins Museum will be open.

The Car Show begins at 12:30 p.m. and a Tractor Poker Run will start at 1:00.  At 3:00, Tractor Games with prizes sponsored by Farm Bureau, and the Bingo tent will open.

Saturday evenings music on the Stage will feature COUNTRY TIME, from Warsaw, IL and will start at 7:30 p.m.  The final raffle drawing will take place at 10:00 p.m. with two $100 winners.  The quilt raffle will also take place at this time.

On the final day of this year’s Antique Fair, Sunday, July 27th, activities will move to the Scotland County Fairgrounds with an Antique Tractor Pull beginning at 10:00 a.m.

Everyone is invited to come out and enjoy a weekend of entertainment, fabulous food, homemade crafts, and a bit of Scotland County history!

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