September 13, 2001

Terrorist Attacks On East Coast Have Ripple Effects Across U.S.


The World Trade Center following the terrorit attacks September 11th. (AP Photo)

NEW YORK (AP) Mounting an audacious attack against the United States, terrorists crashed two hijacked airliners into the World Trade Center and brought down the twin 110-story towers Tuesday morning. A jetliner also slammed into the Pentagon as the seat of government itself came under attack.

Hundreds were apparently killed aboard the jets, and untold numbers were feared dead in the rubble. Thousands were injured in New York alone.

A fourth jetliner, also apparently hijacked, crashed in Pennsylvania.

President Bush ordered a full-scale investigation to "hunt down the folks who committed this act."

Authorities had been trying to evacuate those who work in the twin towers when the glass-and-steel skyscrapers came down in a thunderous roar within about 90 minutes after the attacks, which took place minutes apart around 9 a.m. But many people were thought to have been trapped. About 50,000 people work at the Trade Center and tens of thousands of others visit each day.

American Airlines said two of its planes, both hijacked, crashed with a total of 156 people aboard, but said it could not confirm where they went down. Two United airliners with a total of 110 aboard also crashed _ one outside Pittsburgh, the other in a location not immediately identified.

Altogether, the planes had 266 people aboard.

People on fire leaped from the windows to certain death, including a man and a woman holding hands. Some jumped from as high as the 80th floor as the planes exploded into fireballs. People on the ground screamed and dived for cover as debris rained down. Dazed office workers covered in dirt wandered around like ghosts, weeping, trying to make sense of what happened.

Donald Burns, 34, who had been at a meeting on the 82nd floor of One World Trade Center, saw four severely burned people on the stairwell.

"I tried to help them but they didn't want anyone to touch them. The fire had melted their skin. Their clothes were tattered," he said.

"People were screaming, falling and jumping out of the windows," from high in the sky, said Jennifer Brickhouse, 34, of Union, N.J., who was going up the escalator into the World Trade Center.

By early afternoon, the downtown area was cordoned off and a rescue effort was under way. Hundreds of volunteers and medical workers converged on triage centers, offering help and blood. Paramedics waiting to be sent into the rubble were told that "once the smoke clears, it's going to be massive bodies," said Brian Stark, a former Navy paramedic who volunteered to help.

He said the paramedics had been told that hundreds of police and firefighters are missing from the ranks of those sent in to respond to the first crash.

Within the hour after the attack in New York, the Pentagon took a direct, devastating hit from a plane. The fiery crash collapsed one side of the five-sided structure.

"This is perhaps the most audacious terrorist attack that's ever taken place in the world," said Chris Yates, an aviation expert at Jane's Transport in London. "It takes a logistics operation from the terror group involved that is second to none. Only a very small handful of terror groups is on that list. ... I would name at the top of the list Osama bin Laden."

The president put the military on its highest level of alert.

Authorities in Washington immediately called out troops, including an infantry regiment, and the Navy sent aircraft carriers and guided missile destroyers to New York and Washington.

The White House, the Pentagon and the Capitol were evacuated along with other federal buildings in Washington and New York. The president was taken to Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska, headquarters for the Strategic Air Command, the nation's nuclear strike force, the White House said.

The U.S. and Canadian borders were sealed, security was tightened at naval installations and other strategic points, and all commercial air traffic across the country was halted until at least noon on Wednesday.

"This is the second Pearl Harbor. I don't think that I overstate it," said Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb. The Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor killed nearly 2,400 people and drew the United States into World War II.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said: "These attacks clearly constitute an act of war."

A Virginia congressman, Rep. James Moran, said the intended target of the plane that crashed in Pennsylvania was apparently Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland. The crash site is 85 miles northwest of there. Moran spoke after attending a briefing in Washington.

In June, a U.S. judge had set this Wednesday as the sentencing date for a bin Laden associate for his role in the 1998 bombing of a U.S. embassy in Tanzania that killed 213 people. The sentencing had been set for the federal courthouse near the World Trade Center. No one from the U.S.

attorney's office could be reached Tuesday to comment on whether the sentencing was still on.

Afghanistan's hardline Taliban rulers condemned the attacks and rejected suggestions that bin Laden was behind them, saying he does not have the means to carry out such well-orchestrated attacks. Bin Laden has been given asylum in Afghanistan.

Abdel-Bari Atwan, editor of the Al-Quds al-Arabi newspaper, said he received a warning from Islamic fundamentalists close to bin Laden, but did not take the threat seriously. "They said it would be a huge and unprecedented attack but they did not specify," Atwan said in a telephone interview in London.

In the West Bank city of Nablus, thousands of Palestinians celebrated the attacks, chanting "God is Great" and handing out candy.

In New York, Mayor Rudolph Giuliani said 2,100 people were injured - 1,500 "walking wounded," and 600 others who were taken to area hospitals, 150 of them in critical condition. It could take weeks to dig through the rubble for victims.

"I have a sense it's a horrendous number of lives lost," Giuliani said. "Right now we have to focus on saving as many lives as possible."

Hours after the attacks, huge clouds of smoke billowed from the ruins, obscuring much of the skyline.

The two planes blasted fiery, gaping holes in the upper floors of one of New York's most famous landmarks and rained debris on the streets. About an hour later, the southern tower collapsed with a roar and a huge cloud of smoke; the other tower fell about a half-hour after that, covering lower Manhattan in heaps of gray rubble and broken glass.

On the street, a crowd mobbed a man at a pay phone, screaming at him to get off the phone so that they could call relatives. Dust and dirt flew everywhere. Ash was 2 to 3 inches deep in places. People wandered dazed and terrified.

John Axisa, who was getting off a commuter train to the World Trade Center, said he saw "bodies falling out" of the building. He said he ran outside, and watched people jump out of the first building. Then there was a second explosion, and he felt heat on the back of his neck.

David Reck was handing out literature for a candidate for public advocate a few blocks away when he saw a jet come in "very low, and then it made a slight twist and dove into the building."

People ran down the stairs in panic and fled the building. Thousands of pieces of what appeared to be office paper drifted over Brooklyn, about three miles away.

Several subway lines were immediately shut down. Trading on Wall Street was suspended. New York's mayoral primary election Tuesday was postponed.

All bridges and tunnels into Manhattan were closed.

The death toll on the crashed planes alone could surpass that of the Oklahoma City bombing on April 19, 1995, which claimed 168 lives in what was the deadliest act of terrorism on U.S. soil.

"Today we've had a national tragedy," Bush said in Sarasota, FL. "Two airplanes have crashed into the World Trade Center in an apparent terrorist attack on our country." He said he would be returning immediately to Washington.

American Airlines initially identified the planes that crashed into the Trade Center as Flight 11, a Los Angeles-bound jet hijacked after takeoff from Boston with 92 people aboard, and Flight 77, which was seized while carrying 64 people from Washington to Los Angeles.

Law enforcement officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said it was Flight 77 that hit the Pentagon.

In Pennsylvania, United Airlines Flight 93, a Boeing 757 en route from Newark, N.J., to San Francisco, crashed about 80 miles southeast of Pittsburgh with 45 people aboard. United said another of its planes, Flight 175, a Boeing 767 bound from Boston to Los Angeles with 65 people on board, also crashed, but it did not say where. The fate of those aboard the two planes was not immediately known.

United's pilots union said United Flight 175 crashed into the Trade Center. But the airline had no immediate comment.

An emergency dispatcher in Westmoreland County, Pa., received a cell phone call at 9:58 a.m. from a man who said he was a passenger locked in the bathroom of United Flight 93, said dispatch supervisor Glenn Cramer.

"We are being hijacked, we are being hijacked!" Cramer quoted the man as saying. The man told dispatchers the plane "was going down. He heard some sort of explosion and saw white smoke coming from the plane and we lost contact with him," Cramer said.

Evacuations were ordered at the United Nations in New York and at the Sears Tower in Chicago. Los Angeles mobilized its anti-terrorism division.

Walt Disney World in Orlando, FL, was evacuated, and Hoover Dam on the Arizona-Nevada line was closed to visitors.

Terrorist bombers struck the World Trade Center in February 1993, killing six people and injuring more than 1,000 others.

"It's just sick. It just shows how vulnerable we really are," Keith Meyers, 39, said in Columbus, Ohio. "It kind of makes you want to go home and spend time with your family. It puts everything in perspective," Meyers said. He said he called to check in with his wife. They have two young children.

In 1945, an Army Air Corps B-25, a twin-engine bomber, crashed into the 79th floor of the Empire State Building in dense fog.

In Florida, Bush was reading to children in a classroom at 9:05 a.m. when his chief of staff, Andrew Card, whispered into his ear. The president briefly turned somber before he resumed reading. He addressed the tragedy about a half-hour later.

Traffic Changes Implemented at Two Memphis Intersections

A new stop sign has been installed at the intersection of Market and North Streets in Memphis. the change was approved recently by the Memphis City Council to address visibility concerns at the intersection caused by parked vehicles.

The council approved installing a stop sign for traffic northbound on Market Street. Traffic at the intersection was already stopped by signs on North Street for both east- and westbound traffic.

The move turns the intersection into a three-way stop. Southbound traffic will not be required to stop. The council decided not to make it a four-way stop because of the steep incline heading into the southbound intersection on Market Street, which could be a factor in inclement weather.

The council also agreed to install a yield sign on County Road 555 at the northeast corner of Memphis where the gravel road comes onto Sigler Avenue near Scotland County Hospital. The intersection technically is county property, but the county does not install or maintain traffic signs.

The yield sign will impact southbound traffic on the gravel rood and will not impact traffic on Sigler Street.

Missouri DAR to Host Wheeling for Healing in September

Missouri DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) is sponsoring Wheeling for Healing, a fundraising bike ride across the historic Katy and Rock Island Trail, on Saturday, September 30, 2017 from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.  Proceeds from this ride will be divided between the Wounded Warrior Project and DAR’s Project Patriot.

The WWP mission is to honor and empower Wounded Warriors who incurred a physical or mental injury, illnesses, or wound, co-incident to their military service on or after September 11, 2001.  WWP also supports family members and caregivers of a Wounded Warrior.

DAR’s Project Patriot supports the Chaplain’s Closet at Landstuhl Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany; the Warrior Transition Brigade at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland and the Wounded Warrior and Family Support Center in San Antonio, Texas.  In addition, Project Patriot provides support to deploying and returning service members and their families.

The bike ride will take place across the historic Katy and Rock Island Trail. DAR chapters from all across the state are sponsoring SAG (Support And Gear) stations along the trail. Participants can enter and exit at any point along the Katy Trail and the Rock Island Spur.  The Jauflione Chapter of NSDAR, our local chapter, will be set up at the Hartsburg SAG. All registered riders will receive a T-shirt and swag bag.

Bicycling registration is due June 1st.  However, anyone is welcome to join riders along the trail, and any donation is greatly appreciated and can be dropped off at any SAG location.  For those wishing to register for the event, the Adult Rider fee is $30 and includes a t-shirt and SWAG bag.  The Child Rider (16 and under) fee is $15 and includes a t-shirt.  Jerseys can be purchased for $55 and additional t-shirts can also be purchased for $15.

Susan Miller is the coordinator for the Hartsburg SAG stop being sponsored by our local DAR chapter.  For more information about this event, whether to register as a rider, make a donation, or become a corporate sponsor, please contact Susan at: RR1 Box 130, Memphis, MO 63555 or call her at 660-945-3757.

Junior High Track Squads Close Out Season at Conference Meet

Teammates Kaden Anders and Alex Long battle it out down the stretch in the conference finals of the 200 meter dash. (Photo by Dr. Stephen Terrill)

The Scotland County junior high track teams closed out the 2017 season at the Lewis & Clark Conference on May 9th at Central Methodist University in Fayette.

The Tigers finished third in their inaugural season in the new league while the Lady Tigers were sixth out of nine schools.

Paris won the boys title with 124 points followed by Knox County with 94. SCR-I amassed 86 points to edge Clark County with 81.25 points. Westran was fifth followed by Harrisburg, Marceline, Schuyler County and Salisbury.

Marceline won the girls crown with 159 points. Salisbury (109) was second, followed by Paris (77.33), Harrisburg (75)  and Clark County (45). SCR-I earned 42.33 points to edge Schuyler County (41.33), Westran (15) and Knox County (12).

Kaden Anders led the Tigers with a first place finish in the long jump with a distance of 19′ 6.5″. Alex Long was third with a distance of 18′ 7″.

Anders also took top honors in the 400 meter dash and was third in the high jump and third in the 200 meter dash.

Alex Long finished fifth in the 200 meter dash. He took fourth in the 100 meter dash with brother Hayden Long in fifth. Alex was third in the 100 meter hurdles while Hayden took seventh.

Hayden Long earned third in the 1,600 meter run while Brady Curry was seventh.

Austin Holtke finished third in the shot put.

The 4×400 relay team of Kale Creek, Carson Harrison, Kade Richmond and Holtke finished fifth. They also teamed up for a seventh place finish in the 4×200 relay.

The 4×100 team of Jared Cerroni, Hunter Cook, Kabe Hamlin and Magnum Talbert finished eighth.

Hailey Kraus led the Lady Tigers with a third place finish in the high jump. She took seventh in the 400 meter dash.

Hannah Feeney finished third in the 800 meter run and was seventh in the triple jump.

Aayla Humphrey finished sixth in the 200 meter dash and was eighth in the 100 meter dash.

Shantel Small finished seventh in the 1,600 meter run and eighth in the 200 meter dash.

Haylee McMinn was sixth in the shot put and Emily Dial took eighth in the long jump.

The 4×400 relay team of Morgan Blessing, Jenna Blessing, Emily Terrill  and Kraus finished fourth.

The 4×100 relay team of Bobbi Darcy, Kiley Bradley-Robinson, Jenna Blessing and Morgan Blessing, also took fourth place. The same team took fifth in the 4×200 relay.

Spring Turkey Hunters Harvest 43,339 Birds

Preliminary data from the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) shows that turkey hunters checked 39,239 birds during Missouri’s 2017 regular spring turkey season April 17 through May 7. Top harvest counties were Franklin with 932 birds checked, Texas with 843, and Callaway with 697. Young turkey hunters harvested 4,100 birds during the 2017 spring youth season, April 8-9, bringing the overall 2017 spring turkey harvest to 43,339.

Scotland County hunters checked in 274 adult gobblers, 35 jakes and five bearded hens for a harvest total of 314. Schuyler County hunters bagged 215 birds while Knox County checked in 271 turkeys and Clark County hunters harvested 318 turkeys.

The 2016 overall spring turkey harvest was 48,374 birds with 4,167 harvested during the youth weekend and 44,207 during the regular spring season.

“Given that we haven’t had good hatches the past couple years, and the less-than-ideal weather during a considerable portion of this year’s season, the drop in harvest compared to last year was not unexpected,” MDC Turkey Biologist Jason Isabelle said.

He added that the number of birds harvested this spring wasn’t too far behind last year’s harvest total going into the second weekend of spring turkey season, but the heavy rains that blanketed much of the state shortly thereafter caused the harvest to drop rapidly.

Isabelle noted favorable weather over this past weekend helped harvest numbers bounce back a bit.

The 2017 spring turkey season included two non-fatal hunting incidents. One involved a shooter who mistook another hunter for a turkey and the other was a self-inflicted shooting injury.

Missouri offers some of the best turkey hunting in the nation. MDC restoration efforts in past decades have taken this popular game bird from almost being wiped out in the state by the 1950s to an estimated sustainable population of more than 300,000 birds today. Missouri turkey hunters spend more than $125 million each year on related travel, food, lodging, and hunting equipment, which helps local businesses and the economy.

Tigers Mash Milan 14-0 to Advance to District Championship Game

Aaron Buford tossed two shutout innings as the Tigers blanked Milan 14-0 in the Class District 5 semifinals on Monday in Memphis.

A pair of nice defensive plays early on by the Milan outfielders kept Scotland County off the scoreboard early in Monday’s Class 2 District 5 semifinals in Memphis. But the Tigers’ offense proved too potent to keep down for long, as SCR-I put up seven runs in back-to-back innings to defeat the Wildcats 14-0.

Aaron Buford got off to a rough start, walking the leadoff hitter before surrendering a single. He recovered nicely, striking out the next six batters he faced.

Milan got out of a bases loaded jam when Wyatt Boyle robbed Justin McKee of a hit with a diving catch in center field.

Jesus Gonzalez made a similar play in right field in the bottom of the second inning to steal a base hit from Will Pickerell after Elijah Cooley opened the frame with a bunt single. After Buford was hit by a pitch, Cooley advanced to third on a wild pitch and scored on a throwing error by the catcher. Gage Dodge singled home Buford to make the score 2-0. With two outs, Grant Campbell walked and Will Fromm plated both runs with a base hit. He scored on a double by Lane Pence. McKee followed with an RBI single. After a base hit by Cooley, Aaron Blessing walked to load the bases. A base on balls to Pickerell plated McKee to extend the lead to 7-0.

That was more than enough cushion to give Buford the hook after just 36 pitches, allowing him to be used in Wednesday night’s title game.

The Tigers limited the workload on the rest of the staff as well, adding another seven-spot in the bottom of the third to insure the game would end early by the 10-run rule.

McKee, Campbell and Blessing had RBI doubles in the frame.

Grant Campbell held Milan hitless over the next 2 2/3 innings in relief for SCR-I. Gage Dodge got the final out to nail down the 14-0 victory as SCR-I improved to 19-1 on the season.

Buford notched the win, allowing a hit and a walk in two innings of work while striking out six. Campbell fanned five batters and walked one.

Fromm went 3-4 with three RBIs. Cooley was 3-3 with two runs scored and McKee went 2-3 with two RBIs.

Dollar General Literacy Foundation Awards Nearly $170,000 to Missouri Schools, Nonprofits and Literacy Organizations

The Dollar General Literacy Foundation announced the award of more than $170,000 in literacy grants to Missouri nonprofit organizations, libraries and schools this morning. These funds are aimed at supporting adult, family and summer literacy programs within a 20-mile radius of a Dollar General store or distribution center across the 44 states Dollar General serves, and plan to positively impact the lives of nearly 15,000 Missourians.

“Dollar General is excited to provide these organizations with funding to support literacy and education throughout the 44 states we serve,” said Todd Vasos, Dollar General’s CEO.  “Providing these grants and supporting the communities we call home reflects our mission of Serving Others and it’s rewarding to see the impact these funds have.”

Northeast Missouri Caring Communities, Inc. of Edina received a $12,000 grant.

Statewide grants are part of more than $7.5 million that the Dollar General Literacy Foundation awarded this morning. Recipients of today’s grant announcements plan to use Dollar General Literacy Foundation funds to help adults learn to read, prepare for the high school equivalency exam, promote childhood summer reading or learn English. Missouri recipients are listed below and a comprehensive list of grant recipients may be found online at www.dgliteracy.org.

The Dollar General Literacy Foundation is also currently accepting applications for youth literacy grants through Thursday, May 18, 2017. Youth literacy grants support schools, public libraries and nonprofit organizations in implementing new or expanding existing literacy efforts. Funding can be used to purchase new technology, equipment, books, materials or software to enhance literacy programs. Applications are available online at www.dgliteracy.org.

For additional information, photographs or items to supplement a story, please visit the Dollar General Newsroom or contact the Media Relations Department at 1-877-944-DGPR (3477) or via email at dgpr@dg.com.

Anna Monroe Named to  Graceland University 2017 Honors List

LAMONI, IA (05/16/2017)– The honor roll lists for Graceland University’s 2017 spring term have been announced, and Anna Monroe of Memphis, MO, has been named to the Honors List.

Graceland University students with a GPA between 3.65 and 3.99 are named to the honors list. Congratulations, Anna! Graceland commends you on your academic success.

For more information visit www.graceland.edu and find Graceland University on Facebook and Twitter to follow additional student achievements.

Founded in 1895 and sponsored by Community of Christ, Graceland University in Lamoni, Iowa, is more than just a school. It is a community of passionate, caring and dedicated individuals who put their relationships with students first. Campuses are located in Lamoni, Iowa, and Independence, Missouri. For more information and to see additional student achievements, follow @gracelandu on Twitter and like Graceland University on Facebook, or visit www.graceland.edu.

Cemetery Revitalization

I want to publicly applaud the efforts of Elaine Smith, Ronnie Tinkle, Jeff Smith, and the generous donor(s) who made the revitalization of the Bethel Cemetery possible! On behalf of all the Rodgers, Barr and Overfield descendants, we are so grateful for your hard work!

Seeing Bethel the last time I was in Scotland County was heartbreaking and I wanted so badly to find a way to get it cleaned up. Elaine, Ronnie, Jeff, and the donor(s) were an answer to prayer. God Bless you!

Bruce Rodgers

Rochester, MN

SCR-I School Menus

Breakfast

Thursday, May 18 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Friday, May 19 – Last Day of School! Cook’s Surprise.

Lunch

Thursday, May 18 – Cook’s Surprise.

Friday, May 19 – Last Day of School! Sack Lunch.  Have a Great Summer!

SCR-I Summer School Menus

(Summer School runs from May 22-June 9.  All meals are free of charge to children 18 and under.  Children do not have to be enrolled to eat and walk-ins are welcome.)

Breakfast

Monday, May 22 – Pancakes, Sausage Link, Fresh Fruit, Juice/Milk

Tuesday, May 23 – Last Cinnamon Rolls, Fresh Fruit, Juice/Milk

Wednesday, May 24 – Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Fresh Fruit, Juice/Milk.

Thursday, May 25 – Breakfast Burrito, Fresh Fruit, Juice/Milk.

Lunch

Monday, May 22 – Hot Dog/Bun, Macaroni and Cheese, Peas, Chocolate Pudding, Mandarin Orange Slices

Tuesday, May 23 – Chicken Wrap, Potato Rounds, Buttered Corn, Sliced Pears

Wednesday, May 24 – Cheese Pizza, Green Beans, Applesauce

Thursday, May 25 – Hamburger/Bun, Oven Ready Fries, Tomato Slices and Pickles, Sliced Peaches

Scotland County Senior Nutrition Center

MENU

Thursday, May 18 – Tenderloin/Bun, Onions, French Fries, Pea Salad, Pineapple, Brownies

Friday, May 19 – Roast Beef, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Green Beans, Carrot-Pineapple Cake

Monday, May 22 – Sausage Biscuits/Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, Buttered Carrots, Applesauce, Cookie

Tuesday, May 23 – Lasagna/Meat Sauce, Lettuce Salad, Hominy, Garlic Bread, Peaches

Wednesday, May 24 – Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Green Beans, Hot Roll, Fruit Salad

Thursday, May 25 – Roast Pork, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Sauerkraut, Cranberry Sauce, Slice Bread, Pudding

ACTIVITIES

Thursday, May 11 – Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Wednesday, May 17 – Board and Business Meeting at 1:00 p.m.

Thursday, May 18 – Health Department here for blood pressure checks, Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

Thursday, May 25 – Card Party at 5:00 p.m.

« Older Entries