August 23, 2001

Outdoor Corner

by Chris Feeney

If I could only convince the boss, I think I may have come up with a good idea for a series of articles for the Outdoor Column. This weekend we traveled to Silver Dollar City and spent Saturday afternoon at the amusement park. I knew I was scheduled to be on the road pretty much the entire weekend so I knew there would be little chance to make any fishing or golf outings to write about. I planned to make a stop at Bass Pro in Springfield which is always good for a column. But I sat dreaming about the Fall Hunting Classic that was being held at the treasure land while I sat in bumper-to-bumper traffic in Branson. As we sat motionless in the car my mind began to drift to work (don't tell my wife as she insisted I was not to even think about work while on vacation - fortunately I was able to hide the laptop computer from her). As is typical for me as Monday looms ever closer, I started to get concerned about what I would have to put in the paper. The Outdoor Corner loomed as a major issue since I didn't figure anyone would want to hear about sitting with screaming kids or four irritated spouses.

That's when the idea light bulb first began to flicker. Why not write about the amusement park? I'm sure there are lots of people that are looking for good places to spend their vacation. And isn't the park located outdoors? So as I began to convince myself of the idea I noticed the fuel light on and realized I needed to make a stop for gasoline quickly. This is when the idea got really interesting and even earned my wife's full support. Since I was going to write about the trip, shouldn't the costs of the excursion be tax deductible? It was business, correct? So why not charge my gasoline and the entry fee at the park to my business?

Now that I've made you wait to hear about the park nearly as long as we had to wait in traffic to get there, I'll earn my expense money and give you a little critic's review.

Since this is the first in the proposed series (and possibly the last since summer is nearly over as is my two-days of vacation that the boss lets me have each decade) I can't rate Silver Dollar City with stars or anything like that. I will say that the amusement park has a unique theme that is a refreshing escape from the barkers and money-swallowing games that are typical at most parks. Silver Dollar City instead offers a number of historical artisans performing demonstrations of such skills as black smith work, the creation of glass, pottery and other crafts. It was interesting to watch the artist create a glass vase, taking the 2000-degree material on the end of the rod and blowing air into the molten material to make the container.

However this was only interesting to the two youngsters for about five minutes until they were ready to head for the noisemakers and the excitement of the rides. I must offer a bit of a disclaimer, this park is a difficult match for anyone less than 42" inches tall or who is six months pregnant. That limited my wife and our 18-month old niece from enjoying most of the rides.

But for the sake of this column (and my sanity to get away from the hot, tired mob of babies and caregivers) I forged on to ride as many of the rides as I could for the readers. I must admit there are relatively few rides built for the older clientele. By older, I don't mean graybeards as I won't lump myself into the old crowd yet. There were basically half a dozen rides designed for adults. There were three water rides that were quite enjoyable considering the heat as long as you didn't mind being soaked the rest of the day. If you weren't into water but still wanted a thrill, there were a number of roller coasters with the crown jewel of the park being the new Wildfire.

I have to admit I'm a bit jittery when it comes to these things. I'm not really afraid of heights, just scared to death of falling from them. Of course Wildfire gets that fear out of the way immediately as you plunge straight down for like what seems a couple hundred feet at a speed in excess of 60 mph. Once your stomach comes back, the rest of the three-mile ride seams easy as you do numerous loops and inversions and other scary facts that leave you walking away dizzy, excited, scared and the rest of the gamete of emotions that epitomize a roller coaster ride. It was enough to make me go back for a second try. As we coasted up the ridge toward that enormous plunge I had to ask myself why I was doing this again, but then again why was I willing to go back and get in line for a third try?

Okay for all you searching for a vacation spot, I would say Silver Dollar City is a worthwhile experience. Just remember, it's not the typical park with hundreds of rides and games, but there are plenty of other interesting shops, crafters and artisans to keep you busy from sun up until sun down.


Downing House Museum Complex News

The Museum Complex has had a very busy summer. We have been fortunate to have some great volunteers who have worked this summer providing tours and updating and cleaning the buildings and displays. Volunteers who have given their time are: June Kice, Gwendolyn Lohmann, AnnaLynn Kirkpatrick, Lynnette Dyer, Melissa Miller, Natalie Miller, Holly Harris, Marie Ebeling, Sandra Ebeling, Janet Hamilton, Elaine Forrester, Diana Koontz, Ruth Ann Carnes, Julie Clapp, Rhonda McBee, and the US Bank employees. We are still gathering aluminum cans to raise funds for the upkeep of our grounds. Thanks to everyone who takes the time to drop those off at the museum and to Elaine Forrester for gathering cans from several local businesses and community friends. Angel Arnold has kindly offered to take the cans with Iowa markings to the recycle center in Bloomfield, Iowa.

A summer thunderstorm brought down some very large tree branches, so the old maple on the front lawn of the Downing House received a much needed trim. Joel Kapfer donated the use of his power lift for Robert Waddell to clean and trim all of the trees in the front lawn. We have also began to refurbish the Rose Garden. It is a work in progress, but we hope to plant new roses in the near future. The local Boy Scout group worked at putting new sand into the brick sidewalk in the garden to maintain it.

The front of the Museum Complex is now illuminated with new outside lighting. Lamp posts and LED lights light the front of the Downing House and the Boyer House. This was made possible by memorial gifts given in memory of Florine Forrester.

The Carriage House is being furnished and is beginning to take shape. We have several tools, blacksmith items, and farm items displayed. New blinds have been hung in the Memphis Depot to help prevent sun damage to items that are found inside on the west side of the historic building.

The Museum Complex will be open on Friday and Saturday during the Scotland County Antique Fair from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  We will not be charging admission, but will ask for free will donations from patrons. We will be displaying several antique quilts in the Downing House music room and parlor on the first floor of the museum. The gift shop will be open with our coverlets, rugs, and museum memorabilia available to purchase. We are once again hosting the Lawn Party. Lunch will be served by the Rutledge School Restoration Society. Serving will begin as soon as the parade concludes. The menu includes pulled pork, cheesy potatoes, green beans, salads and desserts. The Heritage Band will be playing on the lawn for entertainment.

If you haven’t been to the museum complex lately, please come by for lunch and tour our wonderful facility, see our new carriage house and view our beautiful quilts. We have some wonderful local history to share.

Birding Season

Birding season is quieting down, although I am still enjoying my baby blues and the busy hummingbirds. Most of my sugar consumption goes to hummingbirds. They are hungry.

If you are planning to set up a nice bird feeding station, now would be a good time to measure it off and kill the grass, plant shrubs and get it mulched before winter.  Pick out the feeders that you want to get placed and get ready for an exciting winter of bird feeding.

It is a well known fact that I live in the area that Tom Horn was born and lived for a time.  As I have written, he left home when he was 13 and never looked back. By the time he had been gone from home for a year,  he was on Beaver Head Creek, in the heart of Indian country and could speak Mexican fairly well.  His feelings were so different and his life was so different from the way it was when he left home that it seemed to Tom that he had been on the stage line all his life.

During some of his travels, he was hired as a scout and interpreter.  He would be drawing $100 a month. He and the guy he worked with even had the occasion to speak to interpret for Geronimo. He also worked helping return Indians to the reservations, helping them get blankets, rations, and other needed items.

Horn’s next job was in 1879 helping furnish beef to the Indians for $150 for one month.  The Indians he was dealing with were the Chiricahua. San Carlos was near the Gila River and so was Camp Thomas where Horn did some of his dealings. At this time of turmoil, was the beginning of the Indian War. He continued to translate and guide officers through this Indian war.  Early on in 1881, the Indians and Mexicans were always in turmoil. Horn was very intelligent and knew how to deal with both Mexicans and Indians. More to come later.

Continue mixing up your sugar water 1/4 c. sugar to one cup water, keep it fresh, and no need to fill the feeder completely up. No need to add red coloring, and no need to boil. I would not recommend using anything but granulated sugar, organic raw sugar will not sweeten the same and will also spoil faster.  Until next time, good bird watching.

SCR-I Board of Education Approves Tax Rate Increase

money grad

After eight years of deficit budgets, the school board increased the tax levy to $3.50,  well below the $3.69 voter-approved ceiling.

The Scotland County R-I School District ended an eight-year pattern of deficit spending and is looking to a bump in next year’s tax levy to help start a new trend.

The SCR-I Board of Education met August 18th and unanimously approved a tax rate increase for the 2016-17 school year. The board set the 2016 levy rate at $3.50, an increase from $3.3928 in 2015.

The hike is expected to generate an additional $110,000 in revenue that Superintendent Ryan Bergeson indicated will be utilized in helping to meet maintenance and facility costs.

“Basically we felt like we were in a position where we really need the added revenue to help us to continue to provide quality educational opportunities for our kids,” said Bergeson.

The revenue increase represents what amounts to a 1.7% budget increase overall for the district, which forecasted expenditures of $6.328 million in 2016-17.

The district has benefited from positive balances, which allowed it to weather nearly a decade of deficit spending.

But faced with growing maintenance needs as well as facility upgrades, Bergeson said the board decided to move forward with the tax rate increase, while choosing to still remain well below the voter approved tax rate ceiling.

More than a decade ago, local voters approved a $3.69 tax rate ceiling, a rate the board of education has never reached, instead offering voluntary rollbacks every year since the ceiling was established.

“I would estimate that these levy rollbacks have saved taxpayers around $2 million over the past several years,” said Bergeson.

The state also plays a role in the levy rate. The Hancock Amendment sets limits on the rates at which tax revenues can increase. For school districts, that specifically correlates with local assessed valuations, meaning if new construction or other upgrades cause significant increases in the total assessed valuation of the tax district, the district’s tax rate ceiling is lowered to try to prevent revenue windfalls that weren’t intended.

In 2016, the adjusted tax rate ceiling for SCR-I is $3.5949, meaning the board took a voluntary reduction of more than nine cents when establishing the current tax rate.

In 2015 the SCR-I tax rate went down to $3.3829 to account for a nearly $9 million increase in the district’s assessed valuation coming through the addition of the former Gorin R-III district. The tax rate in 2014 was $3.43.

The Gorin annexation also brought in some additional revenue in the form of the district’s existing cash balances, which helped SCR-I break the deficit budget trend as well.

“I think we were going to be close without it, but it definitely was a big boost that helped us meet some of our transportation needs,” said Bergeson.

With the Gorin balance transfer, SCR-I closed the 2015-16 fiscal year with $6,802,127.68 in revenue. With expenditures of $6,394,274.93, the district had a surplus year of $407,852.75.

Bergeson noted that a big chuck of that surplus has already been put into play with the recent purchase of three new buses and a fourth used bus.

“With a total of 18 buses in the fleet, we have a constant need for upgrading,” said Bergeson. “This one-time revenue increase from Gorin helped us address that in a significant fashion.”

The superintendent indicated that the district spent nearly $300,000 on the bus upgrades, a point of emphasis for the district, which has replaced 10 of the oldest buses in the past several years.

The remainder of last year’s surplus, combined with the added tax revenue from the levy increase will be used to meet the district’s day-to-day expenses with an eye toward looming upkeep and repairs as well as facility upgrades.

“The heating and air conditioning system at the elementary school is one issue we will likely be looking at,” said Bergeson. “Obviously we also have facility needs, and we’ll be considering all of our options on how to provide more classroom space and on how to house our early childhood programs.”

BOND ISSUE

In other business, the board addressed the August election results. Board President, Trinity Davis, appointed a Facilities Committee to continue working to address facility needs for the school district.  Davis appointed George Koontz, Jamie Triplett, herself, Ryan Bergeson, Erin Tallman, and Kirk Stott to the committee.  The first meeting was scheduled for 8:30 a.m. on Monday, August 22.

BLEACHERS

The board voted 6-0 to purchase the bleachers for the softball and baseball fields at a total cost to the district of $5,000.  The total cost of the bleachers was $10,000 and the Scotland County R-1 Booster Club agreed to contribute $5,000 for the upgrade.

BOARD MEETING

The September Board Meeting is set for Thursday, September 8, 2016 in the Elementary Art Room.

EXECUTIVE SESSION

The board approved Tia Hamilton as Junior High Cheerleading Coach and Shelby McAfee as Volunteer Cheer Coach.

Dr. Larry Wiggins Inducted into Missouri 4-H Hall of Fame

Missouri 4-H Foundation Chair Dr. Marla Tobin (left) with Scotland County 4-H volunteer Dr. Larry Wiggins. Photo by Amanda Stapp.

Missouri 4-H Foundation Chair Dr. Marla Tobin (left) with Scotland County 4-H volunteer Dr. Larry Wiggins. Photo by Amanda Stapp.

“Making the best better” for generations of Missouri 4-H Club members, Dr. Larry Wiggins of Memphis was inducted into the Missouri 4-H Hall of Fame on Aug. 13 at State Fair Community College in Sedalia.

He was among 54 inductees from 40 counties establishing a legacy totaling 1,594 years of service to 4-H. More than 400 family members and friends attended the 10th annual event.

Dr. Larry Wiggins has dedicated more than 40 years of service to Scotland County 4-H. In the early 1970’s, he and his family were charter members of the Jolly Jacks and Jills 4-H Club, which remains one of the largest clubs in the county today.

Dr. Wiggins was the veterinary science project leader from the early 1970’s to the 1990’s, and held many of his project meetings during his small animal clinic, providing an incredible opportunity for 4-H members to witness a variety of animal science lessons. Today, he still welcomes 4-H and FFA members to visit his clinic for learning opportunities and job shadowing experiences.

The Missouri 4-H Foundation recognizes individuals who have created a legacy of service to 4-H by honoring them with membership in the Missouri 4-H Hall of Fame, said Rachel Augustine, associate director of development for the Missouri 4-H Foundation.

“These volunteers have played a vital role in helping our youth develop essential life skills that will empower them to become strong leaders in the 21st-century workforce,” she said. “We are proud to honor their legacy of service to Missouri 4-H.”

The annual event is sponsored by FCS Financial and the Missouri State Fair in partnership with the Missouri 4-H Foundation.

“Our University of Missouri Extension 4-H youth faculty and staff work in partnership with our volunteers to see they have the support needed to empower youth to succeed as future leaders,” said Dr. Ina Metzger Linville, program director, MU Extension 4-H Center for Youth Development. “Dedicated faculty and staff, committed volunteers, and spirited 4-H’ers will continue to learn and grow together to help our youth and communities thrive.”

For more than 65 years, the Missouri 4-H Foundation has been managing funds for the MU Extension 4-H Youth Development Program, providing higher education scholarships and recognizing 4-H volunteers. MU Extension 4-H is a community of more than 260,000 youths from across Missouri learning leadership, citizenship and life skills.

Bar B Saddle Club Holds August Meeting

The Bar B Saddle Club of Bible Grove held their monthly meeting Monday, August 15th at the Club House.

Final plans were made for the horse and ATV’s Poker Ride. Discussion was held regarding the arena work and materials. Also, horseback riders are needed for the parades in Memphis on Saturday, August 27th (Antique Fair) and in Downing on Saturday, September 10th (Downing Appreciation).  All are welcome to come and ride with the Saddle Club.

The next meeting will be Thursday, September 1st at 6:00 p.m. at the Club House.

Scotland County Genealogical Society Holds August Meeting

The Scotland County Genealogical Society met Monday, August 8th with eight members present plus one new member.  Darlene Johnston called the meeting to order.

The secretary gave her report.  There wasn’t a treasurer’s report to give.

Under new business, Alisa Kigar inquired if we would like Dr. Heather Martin, a new member of SCH staff, to present a program.  Everyone agreed this sounded like a good program and she will be presenting at the September meeting.

There was no old business to discuss and President Johnston closed the meeting so the program could begin.

Bonnie Hayes gave the program this month on getting your DNA testing done through Ancestry.  We learned that 50% of our DNA comes from both our parents and that 50% of their DNA comes from each of their parents, and so on.  When getting back the results of your DNA, you will have a chart showing how different segments of DNA might have been passed down to each generation.  Siblings can have different segments than what you have.  Genetic inheritance is random and sibling’s ethnicity results are a great example of this.

Several members of the Genealogy Society have done the DNA testing so curiosity getting the best of me; I decided to give it a try to see what is in my blood line.  I know there is Irish and English so in a few weeks, I will know more.  If anyone would like more information about this, they can go in on Ancestry.com or ask a member of the Genealogy Society for help.

This was a good program and many thanks to Bonnie Hayes for having this program.

Following the program, refreshments were served by Darlene Johnston.  Thanks to Darlene.

The Genealogical Society would like to invite anyone to come to their meetings which are held once a month on the second Monday of each month at 1:30 p.m.  The meetings are held in the Genealogy Building across from the Memphis Fire Station.

Submitted by Terry Arnold, Secretary

SCR-I School Menus

Breakfast

Thursday, August 25 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Friday, August 26 – Sausage/Gravy Biscuits, Choice of Cereal, Blueberry Muffin, Banana, Juice/Milk

Monday, August 29 – Donuts, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Fruit Medley, Juice/Milk

Tuesday, August 30 –Pancakes, Choice of Cereal, Sausage Link, Toast/Jelly, Strawberries, Juice/Milk

Wednesday, August 31 – Ham/Cheese on Croissant, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Fruit Medley, Juice/Milk

Thursday, September 1 – Breakfast Burrito, Choice of Cereal, Toast/Jelly, Orange Wedge/Grapes, Juice/Milk

Lunch

Thursday, August 25 – Spaghetti/Meat Sauce, Chicken Wrap, Hamburger Bar, Green Beans, Garlic Bread, Fruit Salad, Fresh Fruit

Friday, August 26 – Walking Taco, Fish Square/Bun, Diced Tomatoes, Cottage Cheese, Sliced Peaches, Fresh Fruit

Monday, August 29 – Crispy Chicken Strips, Corn Dog, 5th/6th Grade Chef Salad, Potato Rounds, Mixed Vegetables, Mandarin Orange Slices, Fresh Fruit

Tuesday, August 30 – Chicken Patty/Bun, Cheeseburger/Bun, 5th/6th Grade Taco Bar, Oven Ready Fries, Peas, Sliced Peaches, Fresh Fruit

Wednesday, August 31 – Salisbury Steak, Beef and Noodles, 5th/6th Grade Potato Bar, Whipped Potatoes/Gravy, Broccoli/Cheese Sauce, Dinner Roll, Sliced Pears, Fresh Fruit

Thursday, September 1 – Beef‘N’Tator Bake, Chicken Quesadillas, Hamburger Bar, Green Beans, Dinner Roll, Strawberries.

Lady Tigers Prevail 3-1 in Extra Innings to Win Season Opener

Julie Long puts down the sacrifice bunt during the Lady Tigers’ season opener at Putnam County on August 22nd. SCR-I picked up the 3-1 victory.

Julie Long puts down the sacrifice bunt during the Lady Tigers’ season opener at Putnam County on August 22nd. SCR-I picked up the 3-1 victory.

It took a little longer than normal, but the Scotland County softball squad opened the 2016 season in the win column with a 3-1 victory at Putnam County that took 10 innings to decide.

SCR-I jumped on top 1-0 in the top of the first inning. With one out, Stevi See crushed a double to left field which would have been out of most fields. The junior catcher came in to score on a two-out hit by Ashleigh Creek.

The lone run looked like it might hold up as Creek was perfect through two plus innings before a two-out hit and a walk created a scare in the bottom of the third. But she was able to coax a comebacker out of Kori Hornaday to end the threat.

Unfortunately, the SCR-I offense went completely quiet after the opening frame. Kendall Ingersoll retired six straight batters before See launched a deep flyball to center field that was misplayed for a two base error.

But the Lady Midgets’ pitcher worked out of the jam, going on to retire seven straight batters.

SCR-I’s best threat came in the sixth inning when Abi Feeney reached on an error. She stole second base and moved to third when the throw skipped into centerfield. But See ripped a liner down the third base line that was snagged by Jordan Holland at the bag to easily double off the runner and end the threat.

That proved costly, as Putnam County finally got on the scoreboard in the bottom of the sixth. Kennedy Childers led off with a double. Following an SCR-I error that allowed Sara Webb to reach, Putnam County used a sacrifice bunt followed by an RBI groundout by Riley Rouse to knot the score at 1-1.

SCR-I was unable to take advantage of a leadoff walk to Kaylyn Anders in the eight, and then left two runners in scoring position in the ninth inning after a base hit by See and an error that allowed Creek to reach base.

After a leadoff single in the bottom of the seventh, Creek retired nine straight batters.

SCR-I finally broke through in the 10th inning. Anders walked to start the rally. Katie Feeney followed with a base hit. Abi Feeney reached on an error to load the bases with one out. See delivered a sacrifice fly to leftfield. Anders tagged up and beat the throw home. An errant throw to third trying to get Katie Feeney, allowed the freshman to come all the way in to push the lead to 3-1.

Creek worked around a leadoff error to retire the heart of the Putnam County order to secure the win.

See led the offense, going 2-4 with a run scored and an RBI. Creek was 1-4 with an RBI.

Creek picked up the win, allowing one unearned run in 10 innings of work. She allowed just four hits and walked one while striking out six.

19th Annual Ag Day Golf Tournament at Timber Ridge

J & J Ag Equipment Sales is hosting the 19th Annual Ag Day Tournament at Timber Ridge Golf Course on Friday, September 9, 2016.  Sign-in opens at 9:00 a.m. with a 10:00 a.m. shotgun start.

The tournament is an 18 Hole, 4 Person Scramble.  Cost per team is $360 and includes lunch and beverages all day.  Teams are encouraged to sign-up early to reserve a spot and can pre-register by contacting Randy (660-216-7306), Kris (660-341-0465, or the golf course (660-883-5341).

In addition to free food and drink, there will be a silent auction and games.  The Hole in One contest is being sponsored by Pepsi, The Farm Shop and Gas & More.

Timber Ridge Golf Course is located on Hwy 15, south of Memphis.

Area Moving On Program to Meet August 30

The Scotland County Area Moving On Program will hold their monthly meeting on Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at the Methodist Church starting at 11:30 a.m.  After lunch, the group will travel to Edina to the Baker Cemetery.

If you have suffered a loss, the Area Moving On group helps provide support through caring confidential visiting and fellowship with others than have lost love ones by sharing support and friendship with each other.  This is a monthly meeting with the time and meeting place decided on by those attending.

For more information or to arrange for a ride, please call Nelda Billups (660-328-6367), Laura Schenk (660-465-7363) or Chris Tinkle, Program Coordinator (660-465-7322.

Local sponsors of the program include The Daisy Patch, US Bank, Rose Hardware, Payne Funeral Chapel, Memphis Funeral Home, Countryside Flowers, Community Bank of Memphis, and Exchange Bank of Northeast Missouri.

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